When the amnestic mild cognitive impairment disappears: characterisation of the memory profile

Roberto Monastero, Roberta Perri, Giovanni A. Carlesimo, Laura Serra, Carlo Caltagirone

Risultato della ricerca: Article

20 Citazioni (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Subjects affected by mild cognitive impairment (MCI) may improve during the observation period. This is the first study investigating qualitative features of memory deficits in subjects affected by reversible MCI [reversible cognitive impairment (RCI)]. METHODS: Baseline cognitive and memory performances of 18 subjects affected by amnestic MCI who had normalized cognitive performances at follow-ups were compared with those of 76 amnestic MCI subjects who still showed impaired cognitive performances at the 24-month follow-up (MCI) and with those of a group of 87 matched control subjects (normal controls). RESULTS: Compared with normal controls the memory deficit in the MCI group affected all aspects of explicit long-term memory functioning; in the RCI group, instead, the memory deficit only affected the free recall of verbal material, particularly when the encoding could be improved by the use of semantic strategies. CONCLUSIONS: These results are consistent with the view that the memory deficit in the MCI group is due to a very early degenerative pathology; in the RCI group, instead, a transitory reduction of processing resources, resulting a poor encoding of incoming material, is likely at the origin of the reversible memory disorder.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)109-116
Numero di pagine8
RivistaCognitive and Behavioral Neurology
Volume22
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2009

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Memory Disorders
Cognitive Dysfunction
Long-Term Memory
Semantics
Research Design
Observation
Pathology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Medicine(all)
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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When the amnestic mild cognitive impairment disappears: characterisation of the memory profile. / Monastero, Roberto; Perri, Roberta; Carlesimo, Giovanni A.; Serra, Laura; Caltagirone, Carlo.

In: Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology, Vol. 22, 2009, pag. 109-116.

Risultato della ricerca: Article

Monastero, Roberto ; Perri, Roberta ; Carlesimo, Giovanni A. ; Serra, Laura ; Caltagirone, Carlo. / When the amnestic mild cognitive impairment disappears: characterisation of the memory profile. In: Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology. 2009 ; Vol. 22. pagg. 109-116.
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