Using the simplified falling head technique to detect temporal changes in field-saturated hydraulic conductivity at the surface of a sandy loam soil

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Abstract

Determining temporal changes in field-saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs) is important for understanding and modeling hydrological phenomena at the field scale. Little is known about temporal variability of Kfs values measured at permanent sampling points. In this investigation, the Simplified Falling Head (SFH) technique was used for an approximately two-year period to determine temporal changes in Kfs at 11 permanent sampling points established at the surface of a sandy loam soil. Additional Kfs measurements were obtained by the single-ring Pressure Infiltrometer (PI) technique to also compare the SFH and PI techniques. The lowest mean values of Kfs, M(Kfs), were detected in December and January (20.5 < M(Kfs) < 146.2 mm h-1) whereas higher results (190.5 < M(Kfs) < 951.9 mm h-1) were obtained in the other months of the year. The Kfs values were higher and less variable in the dry soil (i < 0.21 m3 m-3, M(Kfs) = 340.6 mm h-1, CV(Kfs) = 106%) than in the wet one ((i > 0.21 m3 m-3, M(Kfs) = 78.4 mm h-1, CV(Kfs) = 185%). Both wet and dry soil were less conductive at the end of the study period than at the beginning one but a more appreciable change was detected for the dry soil (Kfs decreasing by 83.4%) than for the wet one (Kfs decreasing by 63.0%). The simple SFH technique yielded Kfs results similar to the more laborious and time-consuming PI technique (i.e., mean values differing at the most by a factor of two). It was concluded that i) the soil water content was an important factor affecting the Kfs results obtained in a relatively coarse-textured soil, ii) the impact of time from the beginning of the experiment on the saturated hydraulic conductivity was larger for a repeated sampling of dry soil than of wet soil, and iii) the SFH technique yielded reliable Kfs results in a relatively short period of time without the need for extensive instrumentation or analytical methodology.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)283-294
Numero di pagine12
RivistaSOIL &amp; TILLAGE RESEARCH
Volume94
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2007

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saturated hydraulic conductivity
sandy loam soils
sandy loam
hydraulic conductivity
infiltrometer
infiltrometers
soil
sampling
hydrological phenomena
methodology
coarse-textured soils
instrumentation
soil water
water content
soil water content
modeling
experiment

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Soil Science
  • Earth-Surface Processes

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title = "Using the simplified falling head technique to detect temporal changes in field-saturated hydraulic conductivity at the surface of a sandy loam soil",
abstract = "Determining temporal changes in field-saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs) is important for understanding and modeling hydrological phenomena at the field scale. Little is known about temporal variability of Kfs values measured at permanent sampling points. In this investigation, the Simplified Falling Head (SFH) technique was used for an approximately two-year period to determine temporal changes in Kfs at 11 permanent sampling points established at the surface of a sandy loam soil. Additional Kfs measurements were obtained by the single-ring Pressure Infiltrometer (PI) technique to also compare the SFH and PI techniques. The lowest mean values of Kfs, M(Kfs), were detected in December and January (20.5 < M(Kfs) < 146.2 mm h-1) whereas higher results (190.5 < M(Kfs) < 951.9 mm h-1) were obtained in the other months of the year. The Kfs values were higher and less variable in the dry soil (i < 0.21 m3 m-3, M(Kfs) = 340.6 mm h-1, CV(Kfs) = 106{\%}) than in the wet one ((i > 0.21 m3 m-3, M(Kfs) = 78.4 mm h-1, CV(Kfs) = 185{\%}). Both wet and dry soil were less conductive at the end of the study period than at the beginning one but a more appreciable change was detected for the dry soil (Kfs decreasing by 83.4{\%}) than for the wet one (Kfs decreasing by 63.0{\%}). The simple SFH technique yielded Kfs results similar to the more laborious and time-consuming PI technique (i.e., mean values differing at the most by a factor of two). It was concluded that i) the soil water content was an important factor affecting the Kfs results obtained in a relatively coarse-textured soil, ii) the impact of time from the beginning of the experiment on the saturated hydraulic conductivity was larger for a repeated sampling of dry soil than of wet soil, and iii) the SFH technique yielded reliable Kfs results in a relatively short period of time without the need for extensive instrumentation or analytical methodology.",
author = "Angelo Sgroi and Vincenzo Bagarello",
year = "2007",
language = "English",
volume = "94",
pages = "283--294",
journal = "SOIL &amp; TILLAGE RESEARCH",
issn = "0167-1987",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Using the simplified falling head technique to detect temporal changes in field-saturated hydraulic conductivity at the surface of a sandy loam soil

AU - Sgroi, Angelo

AU - Bagarello, Vincenzo

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - Determining temporal changes in field-saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs) is important for understanding and modeling hydrological phenomena at the field scale. Little is known about temporal variability of Kfs values measured at permanent sampling points. In this investigation, the Simplified Falling Head (SFH) technique was used for an approximately two-year period to determine temporal changes in Kfs at 11 permanent sampling points established at the surface of a sandy loam soil. Additional Kfs measurements were obtained by the single-ring Pressure Infiltrometer (PI) technique to also compare the SFH and PI techniques. The lowest mean values of Kfs, M(Kfs), were detected in December and January (20.5 < M(Kfs) < 146.2 mm h-1) whereas higher results (190.5 < M(Kfs) < 951.9 mm h-1) were obtained in the other months of the year. The Kfs values were higher and less variable in the dry soil (i < 0.21 m3 m-3, M(Kfs) = 340.6 mm h-1, CV(Kfs) = 106%) than in the wet one ((i > 0.21 m3 m-3, M(Kfs) = 78.4 mm h-1, CV(Kfs) = 185%). Both wet and dry soil were less conductive at the end of the study period than at the beginning one but a more appreciable change was detected for the dry soil (Kfs decreasing by 83.4%) than for the wet one (Kfs decreasing by 63.0%). The simple SFH technique yielded Kfs results similar to the more laborious and time-consuming PI technique (i.e., mean values differing at the most by a factor of two). It was concluded that i) the soil water content was an important factor affecting the Kfs results obtained in a relatively coarse-textured soil, ii) the impact of time from the beginning of the experiment on the saturated hydraulic conductivity was larger for a repeated sampling of dry soil than of wet soil, and iii) the SFH technique yielded reliable Kfs results in a relatively short period of time without the need for extensive instrumentation or analytical methodology.

AB - Determining temporal changes in field-saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs) is important for understanding and modeling hydrological phenomena at the field scale. Little is known about temporal variability of Kfs values measured at permanent sampling points. In this investigation, the Simplified Falling Head (SFH) technique was used for an approximately two-year period to determine temporal changes in Kfs at 11 permanent sampling points established at the surface of a sandy loam soil. Additional Kfs measurements were obtained by the single-ring Pressure Infiltrometer (PI) technique to also compare the SFH and PI techniques. The lowest mean values of Kfs, M(Kfs), were detected in December and January (20.5 < M(Kfs) < 146.2 mm h-1) whereas higher results (190.5 < M(Kfs) < 951.9 mm h-1) were obtained in the other months of the year. The Kfs values were higher and less variable in the dry soil (i < 0.21 m3 m-3, M(Kfs) = 340.6 mm h-1, CV(Kfs) = 106%) than in the wet one ((i > 0.21 m3 m-3, M(Kfs) = 78.4 mm h-1, CV(Kfs) = 185%). Both wet and dry soil were less conductive at the end of the study period than at the beginning one but a more appreciable change was detected for the dry soil (Kfs decreasing by 83.4%) than for the wet one (Kfs decreasing by 63.0%). The simple SFH technique yielded Kfs results similar to the more laborious and time-consuming PI technique (i.e., mean values differing at the most by a factor of two). It was concluded that i) the soil water content was an important factor affecting the Kfs results obtained in a relatively coarse-textured soil, ii) the impact of time from the beginning of the experiment on the saturated hydraulic conductivity was larger for a repeated sampling of dry soil than of wet soil, and iii) the SFH technique yielded reliable Kfs results in a relatively short period of time without the need for extensive instrumentation or analytical methodology.

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/9543

M3 - Article

VL - 94

SP - 283

EP - 294

JO - SOIL &amp; TILLAGE RESEARCH

JF - SOIL &amp; TILLAGE RESEARCH

SN - 0167-1987

ER -