Unexpected death on an acute palliative care unit

Alessandra Casuccio, Patrizia Ferrera, Sebastiano Mercadante

Risultato della ricerca: Article

Abstract

Although most deaths in patients with advanced cancer are expected, no data are available on unexpected death (UD). This event can be really stressful for physicians who are unable to anticipate, prevent, or discuss UD, and for relatives who are not ready for such an acute emotional burden, despite previous good communication about the short-term prognosis. There is the need for more information, particularly in the setting of an acute palliative care unit where most patients are discharged to follow different therapeutic pathways, including continuing oncologic treatment, home care, or hospice.1,2 The aim of this prospective study was to assess the characteristics of patients who died unexpectedly in an acute palliative care unit.This report highlights that some patients may escape the final pathway commonly reserved to end-of-life care and communication, as well as all the measures used to assure a good death. A larger sample of patients could provide more consistent data, and our data should be considered preliminary. Further studies should be performed with larger numbers of patients and in different settings to provide further information on ED.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)e1-e2
Numero di pagine2
RivistaJournal of Pain and Symptom Management
Volume51
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Palliative Care
Communication
Terminal Care
Home Care Services
Prospective Studies
Physicians
Therapeutics
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

Cita questo

Unexpected death on an acute palliative care unit. / Casuccio, Alessandra; Ferrera, Patrizia; Mercadante, Sebastiano.

In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, Vol. 51, 2016, pag. e1-e2.

Risultato della ricerca: Article

Casuccio, Alessandra ; Ferrera, Patrizia ; Mercadante, Sebastiano. / Unexpected death on an acute palliative care unit. In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. 2016 ; Vol. 51. pagg. e1-e2.
@article{3b8206523dc64c8a9fec6962cbdca993,
title = "Unexpected death on an acute palliative care unit",
abstract = "Although most deaths in patients with advanced cancer are expected, no data are available on unexpected death (UD). This event can be really stressful for physicians who are unable to anticipate, prevent, or discuss UD, and for relatives who are not ready for such an acute emotional burden, despite previous good communication about the short-term prognosis. There is the need for more information, particularly in the setting of an acute palliative care unit where most patients are discharged to follow different therapeutic pathways, including continuing oncologic treatment, home care, or hospice.1,2 The aim of this prospective study was to assess the characteristics of patients who died unexpectedly in an acute palliative care unit.This report highlights that some patients may escape the final pathway commonly reserved to end-of-life care and communication, as well as all the measures used to assure a good death. A larger sample of patients could provide more consistent data, and our data should be considered preliminary. Further studies should be performed with larger numbers of patients and in different settings to provide further information on ED.",
author = "Alessandra Casuccio and Patrizia Ferrera and Sebastiano Mercadante",
year = "2016",
language = "English",
volume = "51",
pages = "e1--e2",
journal = "Journal of Pain and Symptom Management",
issn = "0885-3924",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Unexpected death on an acute palliative care unit

AU - Casuccio, Alessandra

AU - Ferrera, Patrizia

AU - Mercadante, Sebastiano

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Although most deaths in patients with advanced cancer are expected, no data are available on unexpected death (UD). This event can be really stressful for physicians who are unable to anticipate, prevent, or discuss UD, and for relatives who are not ready for such an acute emotional burden, despite previous good communication about the short-term prognosis. There is the need for more information, particularly in the setting of an acute palliative care unit where most patients are discharged to follow different therapeutic pathways, including continuing oncologic treatment, home care, or hospice.1,2 The aim of this prospective study was to assess the characteristics of patients who died unexpectedly in an acute palliative care unit.This report highlights that some patients may escape the final pathway commonly reserved to end-of-life care and communication, as well as all the measures used to assure a good death. A larger sample of patients could provide more consistent data, and our data should be considered preliminary. Further studies should be performed with larger numbers of patients and in different settings to provide further information on ED.

AB - Although most deaths in patients with advanced cancer are expected, no data are available on unexpected death (UD). This event can be really stressful for physicians who are unable to anticipate, prevent, or discuss UD, and for relatives who are not ready for such an acute emotional burden, despite previous good communication about the short-term prognosis. There is the need for more information, particularly in the setting of an acute palliative care unit where most patients are discharged to follow different therapeutic pathways, including continuing oncologic treatment, home care, or hospice.1,2 The aim of this prospective study was to assess the characteristics of patients who died unexpectedly in an acute palliative care unit.This report highlights that some patients may escape the final pathway commonly reserved to end-of-life care and communication, as well as all the measures used to assure a good death. A larger sample of patients could provide more consistent data, and our data should be considered preliminary. Further studies should be performed with larger numbers of patients and in different settings to provide further information on ED.

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/244321

UR - http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jpainsymman

M3 - Article

VL - 51

SP - e1-e2

JO - Journal of Pain and Symptom Management

JF - Journal of Pain and Symptom Management

SN - 0885-3924

ER -