Tree planting density and canopy position affect ‘cerasuola’ and ‘koroneiki’ olive oil quality

Vita Di Stefano, Riccardo Lo Bianco, Tiziano Caruso, Filipa Grilo, Sahar Sedaghat, Raffaele Sacchi

Risultato della ricerca: Articlepeer review

1 Citazioni (Scopus)

Abstract

To maximize orchard production and tree crop efficiency, optimization of both maximum orchard light interception and radiation distribution within the tree canopy are important strategies. To study the influence of planting density and fruit position within the canopy on oil quality from ‘Cerasuola’ and ‘Koroneiki’ olive (Olea europaea L.), fruits were harvested from the upper and lower canopy layers of trees in hedgerow planting systems at two densities: High at 1000 trees ha-1 (HD) and Medium at 500 trees ha-1 (MD). Tree crop efficiency and fruit weight, water and fat content were measured together with olive oil standard quality parameters, phenolic and volatile composition. Fruits in the upper layers of the canopy always showed a higher maturity index, 6% more fat content, and 4% less water content than lower layers. Upper layers of HD trees showed the highest phenol content, whereas lower layers of MD trees showed the lowest phenol content (36% less than the upper layers of HD). HD trees showed the largest differences in fruit maturation, water and fat content between upper and lower canopy positions, increasing quality and oil yield variability at harvest. ‘Koroneiki’ showed more stable oils with a 28% higher MUFA/PUFA ratio and 12% higher phenol content than ‘Cerasuola’ oils. This study provides further evidence of the fact that cultivar, planting density, and canopy architecture may be strong determinants of olive oil yield and composition in hedgerow planting systems.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)1-12
Numero di pagine12
RivistaHorticulturae
Volume7
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Plant Science
  • Horticulture

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