Ticks infesting humans in Italy and associated pathogens

Antonio Cascio, Domenico Otranto, Antonio Cascio, Gioia Capelli, Filipe Dantas-Torres, Sergio Aurelio Zanzani, Maria Stefania Latrofa, Fabrizio Montarsi, Alessio Giannelli, Silvia Ravagnan, Stefania Cazzin, Maria Teresa Manfredi

Risultato della ricerca: Article

64 Citazioni (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Ticks may transmit a large variety of pathogens, which cause illnesses in animals and humans, commonly referred to as to tick-borne diseases (TBDs). The incidence of human TBDs in Italy is underestimated because of poor surveillance and the scant amount of studies available. Methods. Samples (n = 561) were collected from humans in four main geographical areas of Italy (i.e., northwestern, northeastern, southern Italy, and Sicily), which represent a variety of environments. After being morphologically identified, ticks were molecularly tested with selected protocols for the presence of pathogens of the genera Rickettsia, Babesia, Theileria, Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis, Borrelia and Anaplasma. Results: Ticks belonged to 16 species of the genera Argas, Dermacentor, Haemaphysalis, Hyalomma, Ixodes and Rhipicephalus, with Ixodes ricinus (59.5%) being the species most frequently retrieved, followed by Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (21.4%). Nymphs were the life stage most frequently retrieved (41%), followed by adult females (34.6%). The overall positivity to any pathogen detected was 18%. Detected microorganisms were Rickettsia spp. (17.0%), Anaplasma phagocytophilum (0.8%), Borrelia afzelii (0.5%), Borrelia valaisiana (0.3%), C. N. mikurensis (0.5%) and Babesia venatorum (0.6%). Conclusions: Results indicate that people living in the Italian peninsula are at risk of being bitten by different tick species, which may transmit a plethora of TBD causing pathogens and that co-infections may also occur. © 2014 Otranto et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)328-
Numero di pagine9
RivistaPARASITES & VECTORS
Volume7
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Ticks
Tick-Borne Diseases
Italy
Borrelia
Babesia
Rickettsia
Ixodes
Argas
Anaplasma
Rhipicephalus sanguineus
Anaplasma phagocytophilum
Theileria
Borrelia burgdorferi Group
Dermacentor
Rhipicephalus
Sicily
Nymph
Coinfection
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cita questo

Cascio, A., Otranto, D., Cascio, A., Capelli, G., Dantas-Torres, F., Zanzani, S. A., ... Manfredi, M. T. (2014). Ticks infesting humans in Italy and associated pathogens. PARASITES & VECTORS, 7, 328-.

Ticks infesting humans in Italy and associated pathogens. / Cascio, Antonio; Otranto, Domenico; Cascio, Antonio; Capelli, Gioia; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Zanzani, Sergio Aurelio; Latrofa, Maria Stefania; Montarsi, Fabrizio; Giannelli, Alessio; Ravagnan, Silvia; Cazzin, Stefania; Manfredi, Maria Teresa.

In: PARASITES & VECTORS, Vol. 7, 2014, pag. 328-.

Risultato della ricerca: Article

Cascio, A, Otranto, D, Cascio, A, Capelli, G, Dantas-Torres, F, Zanzani, SA, Latrofa, MS, Montarsi, F, Giannelli, A, Ravagnan, S, Cazzin, S & Manfredi, MT 2014, 'Ticks infesting humans in Italy and associated pathogens', PARASITES & VECTORS, vol. 7, pagg. 328-.
Cascio A, Otranto D, Cascio A, Capelli G, Dantas-Torres F, Zanzani SA e altri. Ticks infesting humans in Italy and associated pathogens. PARASITES & VECTORS. 2014;7:328-.
Cascio, Antonio ; Otranto, Domenico ; Cascio, Antonio ; Capelli, Gioia ; Dantas-Torres, Filipe ; Zanzani, Sergio Aurelio ; Latrofa, Maria Stefania ; Montarsi, Fabrizio ; Giannelli, Alessio ; Ravagnan, Silvia ; Cazzin, Stefania ; Manfredi, Maria Teresa. / Ticks infesting humans in Italy and associated pathogens. In: PARASITES & VECTORS. 2014 ; Vol. 7. pagg. 328-.
@article{1b78fe6b1961484aadb235c0277072c6,
title = "Ticks infesting humans in Italy and associated pathogens",
abstract = "Background: Ticks may transmit a large variety of pathogens, which cause illnesses in animals and humans, commonly referred to as to tick-borne diseases (TBDs). The incidence of human TBDs in Italy is underestimated because of poor surveillance and the scant amount of studies available. Methods. Samples (n = 561) were collected from humans in four main geographical areas of Italy (i.e., northwestern, northeastern, southern Italy, and Sicily), which represent a variety of environments. After being morphologically identified, ticks were molecularly tested with selected protocols for the presence of pathogens of the genera Rickettsia, Babesia, Theileria, Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis, Borrelia and Anaplasma. Results: Ticks belonged to 16 species of the genera Argas, Dermacentor, Haemaphysalis, Hyalomma, Ixodes and Rhipicephalus, with Ixodes ricinus (59.5{\%}) being the species most frequently retrieved, followed by Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (21.4{\%}). Nymphs were the life stage most frequently retrieved (41{\%}), followed by adult females (34.6{\%}). The overall positivity to any pathogen detected was 18{\%}. Detected microorganisms were Rickettsia spp. (17.0{\%}), Anaplasma phagocytophilum (0.8{\%}), Borrelia afzelii (0.5{\%}), Borrelia valaisiana (0.3{\%}), C. N. mikurensis (0.5{\%}) and Babesia venatorum (0.6{\%}). Conclusions: Results indicate that people living in the Italian peninsula are at risk of being bitten by different tick species, which may transmit a plethora of TBD causing pathogens and that co-infections may also occur. {\circledC} 2014 Otranto et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.",
author = "Antonio Cascio and Domenico Otranto and Antonio Cascio and Gioia Capelli and Filipe Dantas-Torres and Zanzani, {Sergio Aurelio} and Latrofa, {Maria Stefania} and Fabrizio Montarsi and Alessio Giannelli and Silvia Ravagnan and Stefania Cazzin and Manfredi, {Maria Teresa}",
year = "2014",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "328--",
journal = "Parasites and Vectors",
issn = "1756-3305",
publisher = "BioMed Central Ltd.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ticks infesting humans in Italy and associated pathogens

AU - Cascio, Antonio

AU - Otranto, Domenico

AU - Cascio, Antonio

AU - Capelli, Gioia

AU - Dantas-Torres, Filipe

AU - Zanzani, Sergio Aurelio

AU - Latrofa, Maria Stefania

AU - Montarsi, Fabrizio

AU - Giannelli, Alessio

AU - Ravagnan, Silvia

AU - Cazzin, Stefania

AU - Manfredi, Maria Teresa

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Background: Ticks may transmit a large variety of pathogens, which cause illnesses in animals and humans, commonly referred to as to tick-borne diseases (TBDs). The incidence of human TBDs in Italy is underestimated because of poor surveillance and the scant amount of studies available. Methods. Samples (n = 561) were collected from humans in four main geographical areas of Italy (i.e., northwestern, northeastern, southern Italy, and Sicily), which represent a variety of environments. After being morphologically identified, ticks were molecularly tested with selected protocols for the presence of pathogens of the genera Rickettsia, Babesia, Theileria, Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis, Borrelia and Anaplasma. Results: Ticks belonged to 16 species of the genera Argas, Dermacentor, Haemaphysalis, Hyalomma, Ixodes and Rhipicephalus, with Ixodes ricinus (59.5%) being the species most frequently retrieved, followed by Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (21.4%). Nymphs were the life stage most frequently retrieved (41%), followed by adult females (34.6%). The overall positivity to any pathogen detected was 18%. Detected microorganisms were Rickettsia spp. (17.0%), Anaplasma phagocytophilum (0.8%), Borrelia afzelii (0.5%), Borrelia valaisiana (0.3%), C. N. mikurensis (0.5%) and Babesia venatorum (0.6%). Conclusions: Results indicate that people living in the Italian peninsula are at risk of being bitten by different tick species, which may transmit a plethora of TBD causing pathogens and that co-infections may also occur. © 2014 Otranto et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

AB - Background: Ticks may transmit a large variety of pathogens, which cause illnesses in animals and humans, commonly referred to as to tick-borne diseases (TBDs). The incidence of human TBDs in Italy is underestimated because of poor surveillance and the scant amount of studies available. Methods. Samples (n = 561) were collected from humans in four main geographical areas of Italy (i.e., northwestern, northeastern, southern Italy, and Sicily), which represent a variety of environments. After being morphologically identified, ticks were molecularly tested with selected protocols for the presence of pathogens of the genera Rickettsia, Babesia, Theileria, Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis, Borrelia and Anaplasma. Results: Ticks belonged to 16 species of the genera Argas, Dermacentor, Haemaphysalis, Hyalomma, Ixodes and Rhipicephalus, with Ixodes ricinus (59.5%) being the species most frequently retrieved, followed by Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (21.4%). Nymphs were the life stage most frequently retrieved (41%), followed by adult females (34.6%). The overall positivity to any pathogen detected was 18%. Detected microorganisms were Rickettsia spp. (17.0%), Anaplasma phagocytophilum (0.8%), Borrelia afzelii (0.5%), Borrelia valaisiana (0.3%), C. N. mikurensis (0.5%) and Babesia venatorum (0.6%). Conclusions: Results indicate that people living in the Italian peninsula are at risk of being bitten by different tick species, which may transmit a plethora of TBD causing pathogens and that co-infections may also occur. © 2014 Otranto et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/160242

UR - http://www.parasitesandvectors.com/

M3 - Article

VL - 7

SP - 328-

JO - Parasites and Vectors

JF - Parasites and Vectors

SN - 1756-3305

ER -