The value of serial MR imaging in the assessment of brain metastases volume control during stereotactic radiosurgery

Risultato della ricerca: Other

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate early tumour control capabilities of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) in the treatment of brain metastasis and the role of follow-up MR imaging.Methods and Materials: MR imaging of 54 metastases in 31 patients treated with SRS who underwent follow-up MR imaging within 12 months were retrospectively reviewed. Tumours were characterized as either enlarged (>20% volume increase), stable (follow-up volume ±20% of the initial volume), or decreased (> 0% volume decrease).Results: Within the first 6 weeks following SRS a decrease was observed in 25 (52%) of the tumours in the extent of 63% in size. Tumour reduction varied according to histopathological subtype with 38% of non-small cell lung carcinomas, 41% of breast carcinomas, 14% renal cell carcinoma and 8% of melanomas. At 9 weeks, 7 out of the 25 lesions had a transient tumour volume increase followed by tumour regression at 12 weeks. At 12 months 19 (37%) of lesions increased in volume in the extent of 41% in size. There was a significant higher tumour reduction in those carcinoma types that are considered as radiation sensitive. The best timing for follow-up imaging is at 6, 9 and 12 weeks to provide clinicians useful information.Conclusion: Stereotactic radiosurgery provide volume reduction in many brain metastases and it may be used alone or before whole brain radiation therapy to early tumour control. Follow-up MR imaging provide clinicians useful patient information aimed to make treatment decisions.
Lingua originaleEnglish
Numero di pagine1
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2015

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Radiosurgery
Neoplasm Metastasis
Brain
Neoplasms
Tumor Burden
Renal Cell Carcinoma
Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Melanoma
Radiotherapy
Radiation
Breast Neoplasms
Carcinoma
Therapeutics

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@conference{af254cdbf8954cf48ef81a690dc8d517,
title = "The value of serial MR imaging in the assessment of brain metastases volume control during stereotactic radiosurgery",
abstract = "Purpose: To evaluate early tumour control capabilities of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) in the treatment of brain metastasis and the role of follow-up MR imaging.Methods and Materials: MR imaging of 54 metastases in 31 patients treated with SRS who underwent follow-up MR imaging within 12 months were retrospectively reviewed. Tumours were characterized as either enlarged (>20{\%} volume increase), stable (follow-up volume ±20{\%} of the initial volume), or decreased (> 0{\%} volume decrease).Results: Within the first 6 weeks following SRS a decrease was observed in 25 (52{\%}) of the tumours in the extent of 63{\%} in size. Tumour reduction varied according to histopathological subtype with 38{\%} of non-small cell lung carcinomas, 41{\%} of breast carcinomas, 14{\%} renal cell carcinoma and 8{\%} of melanomas. At 9 weeks, 7 out of the 25 lesions had a transient tumour volume increase followed by tumour regression at 12 weeks. At 12 months 19 (37{\%}) of lesions increased in volume in the extent of 41{\%} in size. There was a significant higher tumour reduction in those carcinoma types that are considered as radiation sensitive. The best timing for follow-up imaging is at 6, 9 and 12 weeks to provide clinicians useful information.Conclusion: Stereotactic radiosurgery provide volume reduction in many brain metastases and it may be used alone or before whole brain radiation therapy to early tumour control. Follow-up MR imaging provide clinicians useful patient information aimed to make treatment decisions.",
author = "Gianvincenzo Sparacia and {La Tona}, Giuseppe and Massimo Midiri",
year = "2015",
language = "English",

}

TY - CONF

T1 - The value of serial MR imaging in the assessment of brain metastases volume control during stereotactic radiosurgery

AU - Sparacia, Gianvincenzo

AU - La Tona, Giuseppe

AU - Midiri, Massimo

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Purpose: To evaluate early tumour control capabilities of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) in the treatment of brain metastasis and the role of follow-up MR imaging.Methods and Materials: MR imaging of 54 metastases in 31 patients treated with SRS who underwent follow-up MR imaging within 12 months were retrospectively reviewed. Tumours were characterized as either enlarged (>20% volume increase), stable (follow-up volume ±20% of the initial volume), or decreased (> 0% volume decrease).Results: Within the first 6 weeks following SRS a decrease was observed in 25 (52%) of the tumours in the extent of 63% in size. Tumour reduction varied according to histopathological subtype with 38% of non-small cell lung carcinomas, 41% of breast carcinomas, 14% renal cell carcinoma and 8% of melanomas. At 9 weeks, 7 out of the 25 lesions had a transient tumour volume increase followed by tumour regression at 12 weeks. At 12 months 19 (37%) of lesions increased in volume in the extent of 41% in size. There was a significant higher tumour reduction in those carcinoma types that are considered as radiation sensitive. The best timing for follow-up imaging is at 6, 9 and 12 weeks to provide clinicians useful information.Conclusion: Stereotactic radiosurgery provide volume reduction in many brain metastases and it may be used alone or before whole brain radiation therapy to early tumour control. Follow-up MR imaging provide clinicians useful patient information aimed to make treatment decisions.

AB - Purpose: To evaluate early tumour control capabilities of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) in the treatment of brain metastasis and the role of follow-up MR imaging.Methods and Materials: MR imaging of 54 metastases in 31 patients treated with SRS who underwent follow-up MR imaging within 12 months were retrospectively reviewed. Tumours were characterized as either enlarged (>20% volume increase), stable (follow-up volume ±20% of the initial volume), or decreased (> 0% volume decrease).Results: Within the first 6 weeks following SRS a decrease was observed in 25 (52%) of the tumours in the extent of 63% in size. Tumour reduction varied according to histopathological subtype with 38% of non-small cell lung carcinomas, 41% of breast carcinomas, 14% renal cell carcinoma and 8% of melanomas. At 9 weeks, 7 out of the 25 lesions had a transient tumour volume increase followed by tumour regression at 12 weeks. At 12 months 19 (37%) of lesions increased in volume in the extent of 41% in size. There was a significant higher tumour reduction in those carcinoma types that are considered as radiation sensitive. The best timing for follow-up imaging is at 6, 9 and 12 weeks to provide clinicians useful information.Conclusion: Stereotactic radiosurgery provide volume reduction in many brain metastases and it may be used alone or before whole brain radiation therapy to early tumour control. Follow-up MR imaging provide clinicians useful patient information aimed to make treatment decisions.

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/103827

M3 - Other

ER -