3 Citazioni (Scopus)

Abstract

Progress in digital ultrasound technology and diffusion of Doppler ultrasound evaluation of the kidney enable a widespread non-invasive evaluation of renal haemodynamics. Initially most attention has been paid to the study of extraparenchymal renal arteries, mainly to detect renovascular disease. However, this approach has low reproducibility and accuracy. Therefore, interest has gradually moved towards the duplex evaluation of intrarenal anatomy, where the best and most reliable signals are obtained from the large segmental or interlobar arteries that run directly towards the transducer. Among the sonographic parameters used in the last decade, great emphasis has been placed on the intrarenal resistive index (RRI), which is defined as the dimensionless ratio of the difference between maximum and minimum (end-diastolic) flow velocity to maximum flow velocity. It has been used for a long time for the diagnostic and prognostic assessment of renovascular disease . One of the earliest prospective uses of the RRI was in the prediction of kidney function outcomes following intervention for renal artery stenosis. In the pioneering study of Radermacher et al., an RRI[0.80 is associated with poorer outcomes, when surgery or angioplasty is used to correct renal artery stenosis ...
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)889-891
Numero di pagine3
RivistaInternal and Emergency Medicine
Volume10
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Kidney
Arteries
Renal Artery Obstruction
Renal Artery
Transducers
Angioplasty
Anatomy
Pathologic Constriction
Hemodynamics
Technology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Emergency Medicine

Cita questo

The renal resistive index: is it a misnomer? / Mulè, G.

In: Internal and Emergency Medicine, Vol. 10, 2015, pag. 889-891.

Risultato della ricerca: Article

Mulè, G. / The renal resistive index: is it a misnomer?. In: Internal and Emergency Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 10. pagg. 889-891.
@article{650428dba2194196846ca20cc381a9a7,
title = "The renal resistive index: is it a misnomer?",
abstract = "Progress in digital ultrasound technology and diffusion of Doppler ultrasound evaluation of the kidney enable a widespread non-invasive evaluation of renal haemodynamics. Initially most attention has been paid to the study of extraparenchymal renal arteries, mainly to detect renovascular disease. However, this approach has low reproducibility and accuracy. Therefore, interest has gradually moved towards the duplex evaluation of intrarenal anatomy, where the best and most reliable signals are obtained from the large segmental or interlobar arteries that run directly towards the transducer. Among the sonographic parameters used in the last decade, great emphasis has been placed on the intrarenal resistive index (RRI), which is defined as the dimensionless ratio of the difference between maximum and minimum (end-diastolic) flow velocity to maximum flow velocity. It has been used for a long time for the diagnostic and prognostic assessment of renovascular disease . One of the earliest prospective uses of the RRI was in the prediction of kidney function outcomes following intervention for renal artery stenosis. In the pioneering study of Radermacher et al., an RRI[0.80 is associated with poorer outcomes, when surgery or angioplasty is used to correct renal artery stenosis ...",
author = "{Mul{\`e}, G.} and Santina Cottone and Giuseppe Mule' and Calogero Geraci and Massimiliano Morreale and Giulio Geraci",
year = "2015",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "889--891",
journal = "Internal and Emergency Medicine",
issn = "1828-0447",
publisher = "Springer-Verlag Italia",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The renal resistive index: is it a misnomer?

AU - Mulè, G.

AU - Cottone, Santina

AU - Mule', Giuseppe

AU - Geraci, Calogero

AU - Morreale, Massimiliano

AU - Geraci, Giulio

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Progress in digital ultrasound technology and diffusion of Doppler ultrasound evaluation of the kidney enable a widespread non-invasive evaluation of renal haemodynamics. Initially most attention has been paid to the study of extraparenchymal renal arteries, mainly to detect renovascular disease. However, this approach has low reproducibility and accuracy. Therefore, interest has gradually moved towards the duplex evaluation of intrarenal anatomy, where the best and most reliable signals are obtained from the large segmental or interlobar arteries that run directly towards the transducer. Among the sonographic parameters used in the last decade, great emphasis has been placed on the intrarenal resistive index (RRI), which is defined as the dimensionless ratio of the difference between maximum and minimum (end-diastolic) flow velocity to maximum flow velocity. It has been used for a long time for the diagnostic and prognostic assessment of renovascular disease . One of the earliest prospective uses of the RRI was in the prediction of kidney function outcomes following intervention for renal artery stenosis. In the pioneering study of Radermacher et al., an RRI[0.80 is associated with poorer outcomes, when surgery or angioplasty is used to correct renal artery stenosis ...

AB - Progress in digital ultrasound technology and diffusion of Doppler ultrasound evaluation of the kidney enable a widespread non-invasive evaluation of renal haemodynamics. Initially most attention has been paid to the study of extraparenchymal renal arteries, mainly to detect renovascular disease. However, this approach has low reproducibility and accuracy. Therefore, interest has gradually moved towards the duplex evaluation of intrarenal anatomy, where the best and most reliable signals are obtained from the large segmental or interlobar arteries that run directly towards the transducer. Among the sonographic parameters used in the last decade, great emphasis has been placed on the intrarenal resistive index (RRI), which is defined as the dimensionless ratio of the difference between maximum and minimum (end-diastolic) flow velocity to maximum flow velocity. It has been used for a long time for the diagnostic and prognostic assessment of renovascular disease . One of the earliest prospective uses of the RRI was in the prediction of kidney function outcomes following intervention for renal artery stenosis. In the pioneering study of Radermacher et al., an RRI[0.80 is associated with poorer outcomes, when surgery or angioplasty is used to correct renal artery stenosis ...

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/180407

UR - http://www.springer.com/italy/home?SGWID=6-102-70-173668106-0&changeHeader=true

M3 - Article

VL - 10

SP - 889

EP - 891

JO - Internal and Emergency Medicine

JF - Internal and Emergency Medicine

SN - 1828-0447

ER -