THE LOSS OF DISPERSAL ON ISLANDS HYPOTHESIS REVISITED: IMPLEMENTING PHYLOGEOGRAPHY TO INVESTIGATE EVOLUTION OF DISPERSAL TRAITS IN PERIPLOCA (APOCYNACEAE)

Maurizio Sajeva, Carlos García-Verdugo, Mairal, Monroy, Caujapé-Castells

Risultato della ricerca: Articlepeer review

17 Citazioni (Scopus)

Abstract

The loss of dispersal on islands hypothesis (LDIH) posits that wind-dispersed plants should exhibit reduced dispersal potential, particularly if island populations are old. In this study, we tested this hypothesis using a detailed phylogeographical framework across different geographical scales.Location: Mainland and island areas of the Atlantic and Mediterranean regions, including Macaronesia (Canary Islands and Cape Verde) and Mediterranean islands in the strait of Sicily.Methods: Forty-five populations of Periploca laevigata, a wind-dispersed shrub, were sampled. Plastid and nuclear microsatellite data were used to reconstruct spatio- temporal patterns of island colonization, and estimates of seed terminal velocity used as a surrogate for dispersal ability under both field and common garden condi- tions.Results: Our findings did not provide evidence of loss of dispersability in any island lineage. In all of the regions considered, dispersal ability was similar on island and mainland populations, or higher on islands. Contrary to LDIH expectations, lineages inferred as the oldest (western Canaries and Cape Verde) converged towards the most dispersive seed phenotype. This pattern was supported by data obtained under common garden conditions. Within the western Canarian lineage, successful dispersal was shown to be very rare among islands and extensive within islands, but dispersability did not vary significantly from older to more recent sublineages. Con- sidering all the study islands, we found a strong, positive correlation between dis- persal ability and estimates of within-island habitat availability.Main conclusions: This study suggests that dispersal ability can be favoured on islands, possibly because traits enhancing wind dispersal are positively selected when habitat availability is high. Our results challenge broad generalizations of the LDIH, but we discuss how overlooking species0 phylogeographical history may give rise to misleading conclusions.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)2595-2606
Numero di pagine12
RivistaJournal of Biogeography
Volume44
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology

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