The coast of Altavilla Milicai east of Palermo. Story of a forgotten coastal landscape between illegal building, architectural-landscape emergencies and the need for protection

Zaira, B.; Rosario, S.

Risultato della ricerca: Paper

Abstract

The coast from Bagheria to Cefalù is characterized by the presence of numerous illegal buildings that, in many cases, are located directly on the shore in defiance to any urban norm. This invasive phenomenon, partly produced also by urban planning regulations careless of the landscape values strongly present in this area, started in the sixties of the XX century, with people looking for second homes for seasonal residence, especially the residents of Palermo. Looking around the Gulf of Termini Imerese, which includes the coast mentioned above, it can be observed how, surrounded and suffocated by contemporary buildings, remains of monumental architecture emerge, such as coastal towers, bridges, traps and churches, one of which, in particular, stands on a slight range near the small town of Altavilla Milicia. These are the remains of the Norman church of Santa Maria in Campogrosso, from where an extraordinary panorama can be enjoyed that spans the Gulf, but also the ancient road connections that cross the territory and in part were modeled on the consular roads built in the classical era. The said landscape is also formed by the cultivation of citrus and evergreen olive trees, that grow on steep artificial terraces built over the centuries by the hard work of man. Unfortunately it appears clearly that all the historical and existing architecture, whether publicly or privately owned, are in a deplorable state of neglect. This condition arises from the lack of knowledge of the cultural values that these architectures instead possess, first of all by the public and private institution and therefore citizens. From such lack of knowledge follows a negation of value, and hence the increase of the abandonment, transformation and disfigurement, up to the complete destruction of this heritage. This essay aims not only at investigating these architectural remains and their environment, but also to propose a process to update and put it into value, through protection, restoration and fruition. Knowledge is still the key tool for understanding and for the return of the interest on the landscape and the historical architectures contained in it, which nevertheless still manage to touch us.
Lingua originaleEnglish
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2017

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title = "The coast of Altavilla Milicai east of Palermo. Story of a forgotten coastal landscape between illegal building, architectural-landscape emergencies and the need for protection",
abstract = "The coast from Bagheria to Cefal{\`u} is characterized by the presence of numerous illegal buildings that, in many cases, are located directly on the shore in defiance to any urban norm. This invasive phenomenon, partly produced also by urban planning regulations careless of the landscape values strongly present in this area, started in the sixties of the XX century, with people looking for second homes for seasonal residence, especially the residents of Palermo. Looking around the Gulf of Termini Imerese, which includes the coast mentioned above, it can be observed how, surrounded and suffocated by contemporary buildings, remains of monumental architecture emerge, such as coastal towers, bridges, traps and churches, one of which, in particular, stands on a slight range near the small town of Altavilla Milicia. These are the remains of the Norman church of Santa Maria in Campogrosso, from where an extraordinary panorama can be enjoyed that spans the Gulf, but also the ancient road connections that cross the territory and in part were modeled on the consular roads built in the classical era. The said landscape is also formed by the cultivation of citrus and evergreen olive trees, that grow on steep artificial terraces built over the centuries by the hard work of man. Unfortunately it appears clearly that all the historical and existing architecture, whether publicly or privately owned, are in a deplorable state of neglect. This condition arises from the lack of knowledge of the cultural values that these architectures instead possess, first of all by the public and private institution and therefore citizens. From such lack of knowledge follows a negation of value, and hence the increase of the abandonment, transformation and disfigurement, up to the complete destruction of this heritage. This essay aims not only at investigating these architectural remains and their environment, but also to propose a process to update and put it into value, through protection, restoration and fruition. Knowledge is still the key tool for understanding and for the return of the interest on the landscape and the historical architectures contained in it, which nevertheless still manage to touch us.",
author = "{Zaira, B.; Rosario, S.} and Rosario Scaduto and Zaira Barone",
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T1 - The coast of Altavilla Milicai east of Palermo. Story of a forgotten coastal landscape between illegal building, architectural-landscape emergencies and the need for protection

AU - Zaira, B.; Rosario, S.

AU - Scaduto, Rosario

AU - Barone, Zaira

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - The coast from Bagheria to Cefalù is characterized by the presence of numerous illegal buildings that, in many cases, are located directly on the shore in defiance to any urban norm. This invasive phenomenon, partly produced also by urban planning regulations careless of the landscape values strongly present in this area, started in the sixties of the XX century, with people looking for second homes for seasonal residence, especially the residents of Palermo. Looking around the Gulf of Termini Imerese, which includes the coast mentioned above, it can be observed how, surrounded and suffocated by contemporary buildings, remains of monumental architecture emerge, such as coastal towers, bridges, traps and churches, one of which, in particular, stands on a slight range near the small town of Altavilla Milicia. These are the remains of the Norman church of Santa Maria in Campogrosso, from where an extraordinary panorama can be enjoyed that spans the Gulf, but also the ancient road connections that cross the territory and in part were modeled on the consular roads built in the classical era. The said landscape is also formed by the cultivation of citrus and evergreen olive trees, that grow on steep artificial terraces built over the centuries by the hard work of man. Unfortunately it appears clearly that all the historical and existing architecture, whether publicly or privately owned, are in a deplorable state of neglect. This condition arises from the lack of knowledge of the cultural values that these architectures instead possess, first of all by the public and private institution and therefore citizens. From such lack of knowledge follows a negation of value, and hence the increase of the abandonment, transformation and disfigurement, up to the complete destruction of this heritage. This essay aims not only at investigating these architectural remains and their environment, but also to propose a process to update and put it into value, through protection, restoration and fruition. Knowledge is still the key tool for understanding and for the return of the interest on the landscape and the historical architectures contained in it, which nevertheless still manage to touch us.

AB - The coast from Bagheria to Cefalù is characterized by the presence of numerous illegal buildings that, in many cases, are located directly on the shore in defiance to any urban norm. This invasive phenomenon, partly produced also by urban planning regulations careless of the landscape values strongly present in this area, started in the sixties of the XX century, with people looking for second homes for seasonal residence, especially the residents of Palermo. Looking around the Gulf of Termini Imerese, which includes the coast mentioned above, it can be observed how, surrounded and suffocated by contemporary buildings, remains of monumental architecture emerge, such as coastal towers, bridges, traps and churches, one of which, in particular, stands on a slight range near the small town of Altavilla Milicia. These are the remains of the Norman church of Santa Maria in Campogrosso, from where an extraordinary panorama can be enjoyed that spans the Gulf, but also the ancient road connections that cross the territory and in part were modeled on the consular roads built in the classical era. The said landscape is also formed by the cultivation of citrus and evergreen olive trees, that grow on steep artificial terraces built over the centuries by the hard work of man. Unfortunately it appears clearly that all the historical and existing architecture, whether publicly or privately owned, are in a deplorable state of neglect. This condition arises from the lack of knowledge of the cultural values that these architectures instead possess, first of all by the public and private institution and therefore citizens. From such lack of knowledge follows a negation of value, and hence the increase of the abandonment, transformation and disfigurement, up to the complete destruction of this heritage. This essay aims not only at investigating these architectural remains and their environment, but also to propose a process to update and put it into value, through protection, restoration and fruition. Knowledge is still the key tool for understanding and for the return of the interest on the landscape and the historical architectures contained in it, which nevertheless still manage to touch us.

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/252107

M3 - Paper

ER -