STAZIONI DELL’ALTA VELOCITÁ IN GIAPPONE. TIPOLOGIA ARCHITETTONICA E URBANA DI UN MODELLO PRAGMATICO

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Abstract

High-Speed railway stations in Japan. The architectural and urban typology of a pragmatic model. By Corinne Tiry-Ono The Japanese high-speed railway service was launched in 1964, during a time of rapid economic and demographic growth. It gave birth to a new, standardized generation of railway stations, and embodied the Tokaido Megalopolis. Originally centred on the capital city, its network now stretches across the entire country, seeking a better balance in terms of regional economic development and the revitalization of peripheral areas. Topographical constraints, natural risks and technical choices (elevated tracks, frequent tunnels, and speci! c rail gauge) led to a physically and technically autonomous infrastructure in terms of land use. The service, running with high frequency through a historically dense urban network, de! nes the shinkansen as an intercity transportation system: its stations are located in the city centers, often next to the existing conventional central stations. This policy o8 ers a high level of accessibility and complete intermodality. There are three dominant types of development in relation to existing urban areas (combined with a central station, distant and with or without a local transport connection). The architectural morphology of the shinkansen station as a bridge makes it adaptable to various situations. It can be de! ned as a pragmatic type of model.
Lingua originaleItalian
pagine (da-a)12-20
Numero di pagine9
RivistaTRASPORTI & CULTURA
Volume38
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2014

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title = "STAZIONI DELL’ALTA VELOCIT{\'A} IN GIAPPONE. TIPOLOGIA ARCHITETTONICA E URBANA DI UN MODELLO PRAGMATICO",
abstract = "High-Speed railway stations in Japan. The architectural and urban typology of a pragmatic model. By Corinne Tiry-Ono The Japanese high-speed railway service was launched in 1964, during a time of rapid economic and demographic growth. It gave birth to a new, standardized generation of railway stations, and embodied the Tokaido Megalopolis. Originally centred on the capital city, its network now stretches across the entire country, seeking a better balance in terms of regional economic development and the revitalization of peripheral areas. Topographical constraints, natural risks and technical choices (elevated tracks, frequent tunnels, and speci! c rail gauge) led to a physically and technically autonomous infrastructure in terms of land use. The service, running with high frequency through a historically dense urban network, de! nes the shinkansen as an intercity transportation system: its stations are located in the city centers, often next to the existing conventional central stations. This policy o8 ers a high level of accessibility and complete intermodality. There are three dominant types of development in relation to existing urban areas (combined with a central station, distant and with or without a local transport connection). The architectural morphology of the shinkansen station as a bridge makes it adaptable to various situations. It can be de! ned as a pragmatic type of model.",
author = "Zeila Tesoriere",
year = "2014",
language = "Italian",
volume = "38",
pages = "12--20",
journal = "TRASPORTI & CULTURA",
issn = "1971-6524",

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T1 - STAZIONI DELL’ALTA VELOCITÁ IN GIAPPONE. TIPOLOGIA ARCHITETTONICA E URBANA DI UN MODELLO PRAGMATICO

AU - Tesoriere, Zeila

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - High-Speed railway stations in Japan. The architectural and urban typology of a pragmatic model. By Corinne Tiry-Ono The Japanese high-speed railway service was launched in 1964, during a time of rapid economic and demographic growth. It gave birth to a new, standardized generation of railway stations, and embodied the Tokaido Megalopolis. Originally centred on the capital city, its network now stretches across the entire country, seeking a better balance in terms of regional economic development and the revitalization of peripheral areas. Topographical constraints, natural risks and technical choices (elevated tracks, frequent tunnels, and speci! c rail gauge) led to a physically and technically autonomous infrastructure in terms of land use. The service, running with high frequency through a historically dense urban network, de! nes the shinkansen as an intercity transportation system: its stations are located in the city centers, often next to the existing conventional central stations. This policy o8 ers a high level of accessibility and complete intermodality. There are three dominant types of development in relation to existing urban areas (combined with a central station, distant and with or without a local transport connection). The architectural morphology of the shinkansen station as a bridge makes it adaptable to various situations. It can be de! ned as a pragmatic type of model.

AB - High-Speed railway stations in Japan. The architectural and urban typology of a pragmatic model. By Corinne Tiry-Ono The Japanese high-speed railway service was launched in 1964, during a time of rapid economic and demographic growth. It gave birth to a new, standardized generation of railway stations, and embodied the Tokaido Megalopolis. Originally centred on the capital city, its network now stretches across the entire country, seeking a better balance in terms of regional economic development and the revitalization of peripheral areas. Topographical constraints, natural risks and technical choices (elevated tracks, frequent tunnels, and speci! c rail gauge) led to a physically and technically autonomous infrastructure in terms of land use. The service, running with high frequency through a historically dense urban network, de! nes the shinkansen as an intercity transportation system: its stations are located in the city centers, often next to the existing conventional central stations. This policy o8 ers a high level of accessibility and complete intermodality. There are three dominant types of development in relation to existing urban areas (combined with a central station, distant and with or without a local transport connection). The architectural morphology of the shinkansen station as a bridge makes it adaptable to various situations. It can be de! ned as a pragmatic type of model.

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/97536

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EP - 20

JO - TRASPORTI & CULTURA

JF - TRASPORTI & CULTURA

SN - 1971-6524

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