Smoke High-Potency Cannabis and Become Psychotic Younger?

Di Forti, M.; Trotta, A.; Stilo, S.; Marconi, A.; Mondelli, V.; Paparelli, A.; Kolliakou, A.; Morgan, C.; Mccabe, J.; Murray, R.

Risultato della ricerca: Paper

Abstract

PURPOSE: Cannabis use is associated with an earlier age of onset of psychosis (AOP). However, the reasons for this remain debated. METHODS: We applied a Cox proportional hazards model to 410 first-episode psychosis patients to investigate the association between gender, patterns of cannabis use, and AOP. RESULTS: Patients with a history of cannabis use presented with their first episode of psychosis at a younger age (mean years = 28.2, SD = 8.0; median years = 27.1) than those who never used cannabis (mean years = 31.4, SD = 9.9; median years = 30.0; hazard ratio [HR] = 1.42; 95% CI: 1.16-1.74; P < .001). This association remained significant after controlling for gender (HR = 1.39; 95% CI: 1.11-1.68; P < .001). Those who had started cannabis at age 15 or younger had an earlier onset of psychosis (mean years = 27.0, SD = 6.2; median years = 26.9) than those who had started after 15 years (mean years = 29.1, SD = 8.5; median years = 27.8; HR = 1.40; 95% CI: 1.06-1.84; P = .050). Importantly, subjects who had been using high-potency cannabis (skunk-type) every day had the earliest onset (mean years = 25.2, SD = 6.3; median years = 24.6) compared to never users among all the groups tested (HR = 1.99; 95% CI: 1.50- 2.65; P < .0001); these daily users of high-potency cannabis had an onset an average of 6 years earlier than that of non-cannabis users. CONCLUSIONS: Daily use, especially of high-potency cannabis, drives the earlier onset of psychosis in cannabis users.
Lingua originaleEnglish
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Cannabis
Smoke
Psychotic Disorders
Age of Onset
Mephitidae
Proportional Hazards Models

Cita questo

Di Forti, M.; Trotta, A.; Stilo, S.; Marconi, A.; Mondelli, V.; Paparelli, A.; Kolliakou, A.; Morgan, C.; Mccabe, J.; Murray, R. (2016). Smoke High-Potency Cannabis and Become Psychotic Younger?.

Smoke High-Potency Cannabis and Become Psychotic Younger? / Di Forti, M.; Trotta, A.; Stilo, S.; Marconi, A.; Mondelli, V.; Paparelli, A.; Kolliakou, A.; Morgan, C.; Mccabe, J.; Murray, R.

2016.

Risultato della ricerca: Paper

Di Forti, M.; Trotta, A.; Stilo, S.; Marconi, A.; Mondelli, V.; Paparelli, A.; Kolliakou, A.; Morgan, C.; Mccabe, J.; Murray, R. 2016, 'Smoke High-Potency Cannabis and Become Psychotic Younger?'.
Di Forti, M.; Trotta, A.; Stilo, S.; Marconi, A.; Mondelli, V.; Paparelli, A.; Kolliakou, A.; Morgan, C.; Mccabe, J.; Murray, R.. Smoke High-Potency Cannabis and Become Psychotic Younger?. 2016.
Di Forti, M.; Trotta, A.; Stilo, S.; Marconi, A.; Mondelli, V.; Paparelli, A.; Kolliakou, A.; Morgan, C.; Mccabe, J.; Murray, R. / Smoke High-Potency Cannabis and Become Psychotic Younger?.
@conference{e6c1fe6175f34a479c954f47ca96f2b7,
title = "Smoke High-Potency Cannabis and Become Psychotic Younger?",
abstract = "PURPOSE: Cannabis use is associated with an earlier age of onset of psychosis (AOP). However, the reasons for this remain debated. METHODS: We applied a Cox proportional hazards model to 410 first-episode psychosis patients to investigate the association between gender, patterns of cannabis use, and AOP. RESULTS: Patients with a history of cannabis use presented with their first episode of psychosis at a younger age (mean years = 28.2, SD = 8.0; median years = 27.1) than those who never used cannabis (mean years = 31.4, SD = 9.9; median years = 30.0; hazard ratio [HR] = 1.42; 95{\%} CI: 1.16-1.74; P < .001). This association remained significant after controlling for gender (HR = 1.39; 95{\%} CI: 1.11-1.68; P < .001). Those who had started cannabis at age 15 or younger had an earlier onset of psychosis (mean years = 27.0, SD = 6.2; median years = 26.9) than those who had started after 15 years (mean years = 29.1, SD = 8.5; median years = 27.8; HR = 1.40; 95{\%} CI: 1.06-1.84; P = .050). Importantly, subjects who had been using high-potency cannabis (skunk-type) every day had the earliest onset (mean years = 25.2, SD = 6.3; median years = 24.6) compared to never users among all the groups tested (HR = 1.99; 95{\%} CI: 1.50- 2.65; P < .0001); these daily users of high-potency cannabis had an onset an average of 6 years earlier than that of non-cannabis users. CONCLUSIONS: Daily use, especially of high-potency cannabis, drives the earlier onset of psychosis in cannabis users.",
author = "{Di Forti, M.; Trotta, A.; Stilo, S.; Marconi, A.; Mondelli, V.; Paparelli, A.; Kolliakou, A.; Morgan, C.; Mccabe, J.; Murray, R.} and {La Cascia}, Caterina and Laura Ferraro",
year = "2016",
language = "English",

}

TY - CONF

T1 - Smoke High-Potency Cannabis and Become Psychotic Younger?

AU - Di Forti, M.; Trotta, A.; Stilo, S.; Marconi, A.; Mondelli, V.; Paparelli, A.; Kolliakou, A.; Morgan, C.; Mccabe, J.; Murray, R.

AU - La Cascia, Caterina

AU - Ferraro, Laura

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - PURPOSE: Cannabis use is associated with an earlier age of onset of psychosis (AOP). However, the reasons for this remain debated. METHODS: We applied a Cox proportional hazards model to 410 first-episode psychosis patients to investigate the association between gender, patterns of cannabis use, and AOP. RESULTS: Patients with a history of cannabis use presented with their first episode of psychosis at a younger age (mean years = 28.2, SD = 8.0; median years = 27.1) than those who never used cannabis (mean years = 31.4, SD = 9.9; median years = 30.0; hazard ratio [HR] = 1.42; 95% CI: 1.16-1.74; P < .001). This association remained significant after controlling for gender (HR = 1.39; 95% CI: 1.11-1.68; P < .001). Those who had started cannabis at age 15 or younger had an earlier onset of psychosis (mean years = 27.0, SD = 6.2; median years = 26.9) than those who had started after 15 years (mean years = 29.1, SD = 8.5; median years = 27.8; HR = 1.40; 95% CI: 1.06-1.84; P = .050). Importantly, subjects who had been using high-potency cannabis (skunk-type) every day had the earliest onset (mean years = 25.2, SD = 6.3; median years = 24.6) compared to never users among all the groups tested (HR = 1.99; 95% CI: 1.50- 2.65; P < .0001); these daily users of high-potency cannabis had an onset an average of 6 years earlier than that of non-cannabis users. CONCLUSIONS: Daily use, especially of high-potency cannabis, drives the earlier onset of psychosis in cannabis users.

AB - PURPOSE: Cannabis use is associated with an earlier age of onset of psychosis (AOP). However, the reasons for this remain debated. METHODS: We applied a Cox proportional hazards model to 410 first-episode psychosis patients to investigate the association between gender, patterns of cannabis use, and AOP. RESULTS: Patients with a history of cannabis use presented with their first episode of psychosis at a younger age (mean years = 28.2, SD = 8.0; median years = 27.1) than those who never used cannabis (mean years = 31.4, SD = 9.9; median years = 30.0; hazard ratio [HR] = 1.42; 95% CI: 1.16-1.74; P < .001). This association remained significant after controlling for gender (HR = 1.39; 95% CI: 1.11-1.68; P < .001). Those who had started cannabis at age 15 or younger had an earlier onset of psychosis (mean years = 27.0, SD = 6.2; median years = 26.9) than those who had started after 15 years (mean years = 29.1, SD = 8.5; median years = 27.8; HR = 1.40; 95% CI: 1.06-1.84; P = .050). Importantly, subjects who had been using high-potency cannabis (skunk-type) every day had the earliest onset (mean years = 25.2, SD = 6.3; median years = 24.6) compared to never users among all the groups tested (HR = 1.99; 95% CI: 1.50- 2.65; P < .0001); these daily users of high-potency cannabis had an onset an average of 6 years earlier than that of non-cannabis users. CONCLUSIONS: Daily use, especially of high-potency cannabis, drives the earlier onset of psychosis in cannabis users.

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/238278

UR - http://www.iepaconference.org/iepa10/page/?page=oral_sessions

M3 - Paper

ER -