Sicily: Navigating Responses to Global Cultural Patterns

Risultato della ricerca: Chapter

Abstract

The persistence in Sicily until the late 1950s of a socio-economic structure firmly entrenched in the pre-industrial age, was to allow its ancient musical practices to remain in use, tied simply to circumstances of everyday life (from lullabies to funeral laments) and calendar feasts (devotional songs). Though today, on the one hand, there is a progressive decline of songs allied to rural way of life and disappearing traditional works (peasants, carters, sulfur-and-salt miners, fishermen, etc.) there is, on the other hand, a noticeably perennial quality associated to songs tied to ritual contexts (Christmas, Easter and local celebrations of patron saints), that still point out an evidence of “local resistance” to the spreading of behaviours suggested by the “global cultural patterns”. This contribution will be framed by a critique of Sicilian song in its wider context, one that will seek to scientifically address the revival of popular song and its relationship to tourism, commercialisation and the market (via the emigrant diaspora).
Lingua originaleEnglish
Titolo della pubblicazione ospiteIslands Songs. A Global Repertoire
Pagine187-202
Numero di pagine16
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Song
Sicily
Popular Song
Economics
Diaspora
Christmas
Easter
Musical Practices
Lullaby
Lament
Way of Life
Funeral
Tourism
Salt
Revival
Everyday Life
Commercialization
Sulfur
Persistence
Calendar

Cita questo

Bonanzinga, S. (2011). Sicily: Navigating Responses to Global Cultural Patterns. In Islands Songs. A Global Repertoire (pagg. 187-202)

Sicily: Navigating Responses to Global Cultural Patterns. / Bonanzinga, Sergio.

Islands Songs. A Global Repertoire. 2011. pag. 187-202.

Risultato della ricerca: Chapter

Bonanzinga, S 2011, Sicily: Navigating Responses to Global Cultural Patterns. in Islands Songs. A Global Repertoire. pagg. 187-202.
Bonanzinga S. Sicily: Navigating Responses to Global Cultural Patterns. In Islands Songs. A Global Repertoire. 2011. pag. 187-202
Bonanzinga, Sergio. / Sicily: Navigating Responses to Global Cultural Patterns. Islands Songs. A Global Repertoire. 2011. pagg. 187-202
@inbook{ac3c631109fa4b17a1954b4ea879fcf0,
title = "Sicily: Navigating Responses to Global Cultural Patterns",
abstract = "The persistence in Sicily until the late 1950s of a socio-economic structure firmly entrenched in the pre-industrial age, was to allow its ancient musical practices to remain in use, tied simply to circumstances of everyday life (from lullabies to funeral laments) and calendar feasts (devotional songs). Though today, on the one hand, there is a progressive decline of songs allied to rural way of life and disappearing traditional works (peasants, carters, sulfur-and-salt miners, fishermen, etc.) there is, on the other hand, a noticeably perennial quality associated to songs tied to ritual contexts (Christmas, Easter and local celebrations of patron saints), that still point out an evidence of “local resistance” to the spreading of behaviours suggested by the “global cultural patterns”. This contribution will be framed by a critique of Sicilian song in its wider context, one that will seek to scientifically address the revival of popular song and its relationship to tourism, commercialisation and the market (via the emigrant diaspora).",
author = "Sergio Bonanzinga",
year = "2011",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-0-8108-8177-8",
pages = "187--202",
booktitle = "Islands Songs. A Global Repertoire",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Sicily: Navigating Responses to Global Cultural Patterns

AU - Bonanzinga, Sergio

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - The persistence in Sicily until the late 1950s of a socio-economic structure firmly entrenched in the pre-industrial age, was to allow its ancient musical practices to remain in use, tied simply to circumstances of everyday life (from lullabies to funeral laments) and calendar feasts (devotional songs). Though today, on the one hand, there is a progressive decline of songs allied to rural way of life and disappearing traditional works (peasants, carters, sulfur-and-salt miners, fishermen, etc.) there is, on the other hand, a noticeably perennial quality associated to songs tied to ritual contexts (Christmas, Easter and local celebrations of patron saints), that still point out an evidence of “local resistance” to the spreading of behaviours suggested by the “global cultural patterns”. This contribution will be framed by a critique of Sicilian song in its wider context, one that will seek to scientifically address the revival of popular song and its relationship to tourism, commercialisation and the market (via the emigrant diaspora).

AB - The persistence in Sicily until the late 1950s of a socio-economic structure firmly entrenched in the pre-industrial age, was to allow its ancient musical practices to remain in use, tied simply to circumstances of everyday life (from lullabies to funeral laments) and calendar feasts (devotional songs). Though today, on the one hand, there is a progressive decline of songs allied to rural way of life and disappearing traditional works (peasants, carters, sulfur-and-salt miners, fishermen, etc.) there is, on the other hand, a noticeably perennial quality associated to songs tied to ritual contexts (Christmas, Easter and local celebrations of patron saints), that still point out an evidence of “local resistance” to the spreading of behaviours suggested by the “global cultural patterns”. This contribution will be framed by a critique of Sicilian song in its wider context, one that will seek to scientifically address the revival of popular song and its relationship to tourism, commercialisation and the market (via the emigrant diaspora).

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/78196

M3 - Chapter

SN - 978-0-8108-8177-8

SP - 187

EP - 202

BT - Islands Songs. A Global Repertoire

ER -