Revision of the tropical African genus Tetraconcha (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Phaneropterinae) with the description of ten new species.

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Abstract

Only five species of the genus Tetraconcha Karsch, 1890 have been previously known; they inhabit tropical forests of central and western Africa. Generally, specimens belonging to this genus are scarcely represented in museum collections, probably due to the difficulty in finding them, but also for the fragility of their body and legs. During some recent expeditions in the Central African Republic and Ivory Coast it was possible to put together an abundant amount of specimens. This allowed the present authorto revise the genus and to find valid characters to distinguish different species. On the whole, ten new species were discovered and the total number now amounts to fifteen species. Interestingly, in the Dzanga-N’Doki National Park (Central African Republic) seven sister species, previously unknown, live together with T. smaragdina; it was possible to separate them by the shape and number of teeth of the stridulatory file under the left tegmen, and later other taxonomical characters were provided. This may beconsidered a case of evolutionary radiation; that is, Tetraconcha species in the Dzanga-N’Doki National Park evolved traits that primarily linked to sound communication. This radiation very probably occurred randomly, possibly driven by genetic drift.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)211-232
Numero di pagine22
RivistaJournal of Orthoptera Research
Volume26
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2017

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Central African Republic
Tettigoniidae
Orthoptera
national parks
new species
Central Africa
Cote d'Ivoire
genetic drift
Western Africa
animal communication
tropical forests
legs
teeth
evolutionary radiation
tegmen

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Insect Science

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title = "Revision of the tropical African genus Tetraconcha (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Phaneropterinae) with the description of ten new species.",
abstract = "Only five species of the genus Tetraconcha Karsch, 1890 have been previously known; they inhabit tropical forests of central and western Africa. Generally, specimens belonging to this genus are scarcely represented in museum collections, probably due to the difficulty in finding them, but also for the fragility of their body and legs. During some recent expeditions in the Central African Republic and Ivory Coast it was possible to put together an abundant amount of specimens. This allowed the present authorto revise the genus and to find valid characters to distinguish different species. On the whole, ten new species were discovered and the total number now amounts to fifteen species. Interestingly, in the Dzanga-N’Doki National Park (Central African Republic) seven sister species, previously unknown, live together with T. smaragdina; it was possible to separate them by the shape and number of teeth of the stridulatory file under the left tegmen, and later other taxonomical characters were provided. This may beconsidered a case of evolutionary radiation; that is, Tetraconcha species in the Dzanga-N’Doki National Park evolved traits that primarily linked to sound communication. This radiation very probably occurred randomly, possibly driven by genetic drift.",
author = "Bruno Massa",
year = "2017",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "211--232",
journal = "Journal of Orthoptera Research",
issn = "1082-6467",
publisher = "Orthopterists' Society",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Revision of the tropical African genus Tetraconcha (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Phaneropterinae) with the description of ten new species.

AU - Massa, Bruno

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Only five species of the genus Tetraconcha Karsch, 1890 have been previously known; they inhabit tropical forests of central and western Africa. Generally, specimens belonging to this genus are scarcely represented in museum collections, probably due to the difficulty in finding them, but also for the fragility of their body and legs. During some recent expeditions in the Central African Republic and Ivory Coast it was possible to put together an abundant amount of specimens. This allowed the present authorto revise the genus and to find valid characters to distinguish different species. On the whole, ten new species were discovered and the total number now amounts to fifteen species. Interestingly, in the Dzanga-N’Doki National Park (Central African Republic) seven sister species, previously unknown, live together with T. smaragdina; it was possible to separate them by the shape and number of teeth of the stridulatory file under the left tegmen, and later other taxonomical characters were provided. This may beconsidered a case of evolutionary radiation; that is, Tetraconcha species in the Dzanga-N’Doki National Park evolved traits that primarily linked to sound communication. This radiation very probably occurred randomly, possibly driven by genetic drift.

AB - Only five species of the genus Tetraconcha Karsch, 1890 have been previously known; they inhabit tropical forests of central and western Africa. Generally, specimens belonging to this genus are scarcely represented in museum collections, probably due to the difficulty in finding them, but also for the fragility of their body and legs. During some recent expeditions in the Central African Republic and Ivory Coast it was possible to put together an abundant amount of specimens. This allowed the present authorto revise the genus and to find valid characters to distinguish different species. On the whole, ten new species were discovered and the total number now amounts to fifteen species. Interestingly, in the Dzanga-N’Doki National Park (Central African Republic) seven sister species, previously unknown, live together with T. smaragdina; it was possible to separate them by the shape and number of teeth of the stridulatory file under the left tegmen, and later other taxonomical characters were provided. This may beconsidered a case of evolutionary radiation; that is, Tetraconcha species in the Dzanga-N’Doki National Park evolved traits that primarily linked to sound communication. This radiation very probably occurred randomly, possibly driven by genetic drift.

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/250737

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 211

EP - 232

JO - Journal of Orthoptera Research

JF - Journal of Orthoptera Research

SN - 1082-6467

ER -