Prospective evaluation of hepatic steatosis in HIV-infected patients with orwithout hepatitis C virus co-infection

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Abstract

Background: Limited data are available on hepatic steatosis (HS) in HIV patients who are not infectedwith hepatitis C virus (HCV). The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of HS and its risk factorsin HIV patients with and without HCV infection, and to evaluate whether HS correlates with advancedliver fibrosis and/or cardiovascular disease risk.Methods: Fifty-seven HIV mono-infected and 61 HIV/HCV co-infected patients were enrolledconsecutively. All patients underwent liver ultrasound and transient elastography. The main parametersof liver function, HIV and HCV viral loads, CD4+ cell counts, and data on highly active antiretroviraltherapy (HAART) were recorded. Cardiovascular disease risk was evaluated using the 10-yearFramingham risk score.Results: HS prevalence in the whole HIV population was 53% (54% in mono-infected patients and 51% inco-infected patients). HS was associated with lipodystrophy and triglyceride values (p < 0.0001),metabolic syndrome (p < 0.0004), and total cholesterol levels (p < 0.001) in both HIV groups. In HIVmono-infected patients, HS was linked with HAART exposure of >1 year (p < 0.01). By multivariateanalysis, only triglyceride levels (p < 0.02) and Framingham risk score (p < 0.05) were independentlyassociated with HS in both HIV groups. No correlation was observed between HS and advanced liverfibrosis, measured by transient elastography.Conclusions: HS was common in HIV patients, occurring in about half of the population. HS was found tobe linked with the Framingham risk score, but was not correlated with advanced liver fibrosis. Wesuggest that in our HIV population with HS, the burden of cardiovascular disease risk is greater than thatof liver disease progression.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)397-402
Numero di pagine6
RivistaInternational Journal of Infectious Diseases
Volume16
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2012

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Virus Diseases
Coinfection
Hepacivirus
HIV
Liver
Elasticity Imaging Techniques
Cardiovascular Diseases
Triglycerides
Population
Lipodystrophy
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Viral Load
Liver Cirrhosis
Disease Progression
Liver Diseases
Fibrosis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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@article{8e8b6041161140dc8fe9dab0e250e044,
title = "Prospective evaluation of hepatic steatosis in HIV-infected patients with orwithout hepatitis C virus co-infection",
abstract = "Background: Limited data are available on hepatic steatosis (HS) in HIV patients who are not infectedwith hepatitis C virus (HCV). The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of HS and its risk factorsin HIV patients with and without HCV infection, and to evaluate whether HS correlates with advancedliver fibrosis and/or cardiovascular disease risk.Methods: Fifty-seven HIV mono-infected and 61 HIV/HCV co-infected patients were enrolledconsecutively. All patients underwent liver ultrasound and transient elastography. The main parametersof liver function, HIV and HCV viral loads, CD4+ cell counts, and data on highly active antiretroviraltherapy (HAART) were recorded. Cardiovascular disease risk was evaluated using the 10-yearFramingham risk score.Results: HS prevalence in the whole HIV population was 53{\%} (54{\%} in mono-infected patients and 51{\%} inco-infected patients). HS was associated with lipodystrophy and triglyceride values (p < 0.0001),metabolic syndrome (p < 0.0004), and total cholesterol levels (p < 0.001) in both HIV groups. In HIVmono-infected patients, HS was linked with HAART exposure of >1 year (p < 0.01). By multivariateanalysis, only triglyceride levels (p < 0.02) and Framingham risk score (p < 0.05) were independentlyassociated with HS in both HIV groups. No correlation was observed between HS and advanced liverfibrosis, measured by transient elastography.Conclusions: HS was common in HIV patients, occurring in about half of the population. HS was found tobe linked with the Framingham risk score, but was not correlated with advanced liver fibrosis. Wesuggest that in our HIV population with HS, the burden of cardiovascular disease risk is greater than thatof liver disease progression.",
keywords = "Steatosis HIV HIV/HCV co-infected Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease Liver disease Antiretroviral medication Metabolic syndrome Lipodystrophy",
author = "{Di Carlo}, Paola and Antonino Terranova and Lydia Giannitrapani and Maurizio Soresi and Giuseppe Montalto and {Li Vecchi}, Valentina",
year = "2012",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "397--402",
journal = "International Journal of Infectious Diseases",
issn = "1201-9712",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prospective evaluation of hepatic steatosis in HIV-infected patients with orwithout hepatitis C virus co-infection

AU - Di Carlo, Paola

AU - Terranova, Antonino

AU - Giannitrapani, Lydia

AU - Soresi, Maurizio

AU - Montalto, Giuseppe

AU - Li Vecchi, Valentina

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Background: Limited data are available on hepatic steatosis (HS) in HIV patients who are not infectedwith hepatitis C virus (HCV). The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of HS and its risk factorsin HIV patients with and without HCV infection, and to evaluate whether HS correlates with advancedliver fibrosis and/or cardiovascular disease risk.Methods: Fifty-seven HIV mono-infected and 61 HIV/HCV co-infected patients were enrolledconsecutively. All patients underwent liver ultrasound and transient elastography. The main parametersof liver function, HIV and HCV viral loads, CD4+ cell counts, and data on highly active antiretroviraltherapy (HAART) were recorded. Cardiovascular disease risk was evaluated using the 10-yearFramingham risk score.Results: HS prevalence in the whole HIV population was 53% (54% in mono-infected patients and 51% inco-infected patients). HS was associated with lipodystrophy and triglyceride values (p < 0.0001),metabolic syndrome (p < 0.0004), and total cholesterol levels (p < 0.001) in both HIV groups. In HIVmono-infected patients, HS was linked with HAART exposure of >1 year (p < 0.01). By multivariateanalysis, only triglyceride levels (p < 0.02) and Framingham risk score (p < 0.05) were independentlyassociated with HS in both HIV groups. No correlation was observed between HS and advanced liverfibrosis, measured by transient elastography.Conclusions: HS was common in HIV patients, occurring in about half of the population. HS was found tobe linked with the Framingham risk score, but was not correlated with advanced liver fibrosis. Wesuggest that in our HIV population with HS, the burden of cardiovascular disease risk is greater than thatof liver disease progression.

AB - Background: Limited data are available on hepatic steatosis (HS) in HIV patients who are not infectedwith hepatitis C virus (HCV). The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of HS and its risk factorsin HIV patients with and without HCV infection, and to evaluate whether HS correlates with advancedliver fibrosis and/or cardiovascular disease risk.Methods: Fifty-seven HIV mono-infected and 61 HIV/HCV co-infected patients were enrolledconsecutively. All patients underwent liver ultrasound and transient elastography. The main parametersof liver function, HIV and HCV viral loads, CD4+ cell counts, and data on highly active antiretroviraltherapy (HAART) were recorded. Cardiovascular disease risk was evaluated using the 10-yearFramingham risk score.Results: HS prevalence in the whole HIV population was 53% (54% in mono-infected patients and 51% inco-infected patients). HS was associated with lipodystrophy and triglyceride values (p < 0.0001),metabolic syndrome (p < 0.0004), and total cholesterol levels (p < 0.001) in both HIV groups. In HIVmono-infected patients, HS was linked with HAART exposure of >1 year (p < 0.01). By multivariateanalysis, only triglyceride levels (p < 0.02) and Framingham risk score (p < 0.05) were independentlyassociated with HS in both HIV groups. No correlation was observed between HS and advanced liverfibrosis, measured by transient elastography.Conclusions: HS was common in HIV patients, occurring in about half of the population. HS was found tobe linked with the Framingham risk score, but was not correlated with advanced liver fibrosis. Wesuggest that in our HIV population with HS, the burden of cardiovascular disease risk is greater than thatof liver disease progression.

KW - Steatosis HIV HIV/HCV co-infected Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease Liver disease Antiretroviral medication Metabolic syndrome Lipodystrophy

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/62820

M3 - Article

VL - 16

SP - 397

EP - 402

JO - International Journal of Infectious Diseases

JF - International Journal of Infectious Diseases

SN - 1201-9712

ER -