Procalcitonin levels in plasma in oncohaematologic patients with and without bacterial infections.

Ciaccio M; Fugardi G; Titone L; Romano A; Giordano S; Bivona G; Vocca L; Scarlata F; Di Gangi M

Risultato della ricerca: Article

13 Citazioni (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The flogosis markers currently in use show both low sensitivity and specificity, particularly in neoplastic and degenerative diseases. Procalcitonin (PCT) is a pro-peptide of calcitonin produced mainly but not only in the C-cells of the thyroid glands and, as several studies show, PCT levels in plasma increase during infections. Bacterial infections are also the main cause of death in oncological patients. Furthermore, in patients with leukaemia in chemotherapy recovery, infections often induce relapses. The aim of the present study is to detect PCT levels in plasma in oncohaematologic patients with and without infections. METHODS: The study was carried out on 54 patients by a quantitative automated immunoassay. RESULTS: PCT plasma levels > or =0.5 ng were detected in 27 out of 30 patients (90,0%) with bacterial infections; 8 out of 9 patients (88,9%) with viral infections and in 12 out of 15 patients in the control group without statistically significant differences. CONCLUSIONS: The results, which differ from those in the literature, are discussed.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)149-152
RivistaClinica Chimica Acta
Volume340
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2004

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Calcitonin
Bacterial Infections
Plasmas
Chemotherapy
Infection
Virus Diseases
Immunoassay
Recovery
Peptides
Cause of Death
Thyroid Gland
Leukemia
Recurrence
Drug Therapy
Sensitivity and Specificity
Control Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cita questo

Ciaccio M; Fugardi G; Titone L; Romano A; Giordano S; Bivona G; Vocca L; Scarlata F; Di Gangi M (2004). Procalcitonin levels in plasma in oncohaematologic patients with and without bacterial infections. Clinica Chimica Acta, 340, 149-152.

Procalcitonin levels in plasma in oncohaematologic patients with and without bacterial infections. / Ciaccio M; Fugardi G; Titone L; Romano A; Giordano S; Bivona G; Vocca L; Scarlata F; Di Gangi M.

In: Clinica Chimica Acta, Vol. 340, 2004, pag. 149-152.

Risultato della ricerca: Article

Ciaccio M; Fugardi G; Titone L; Romano A; Giordano S; Bivona G; Vocca L; Scarlata F; Di Gangi M 2004, 'Procalcitonin levels in plasma in oncohaematologic patients with and without bacterial infections.', Clinica Chimica Acta, vol. 340, pagg. 149-152.
Ciaccio M; Fugardi G; Titone L; Romano A; Giordano S; Bivona G; Vocca L; Scarlata F; Di Gangi M. Procalcitonin levels in plasma in oncohaematologic patients with and without bacterial infections. Clinica Chimica Acta. 2004;340:149-152.
Ciaccio M; Fugardi G; Titone L; Romano A; Giordano S; Bivona G; Vocca L; Scarlata F; Di Gangi M. / Procalcitonin levels in plasma in oncohaematologic patients with and without bacterial infections. In: Clinica Chimica Acta. 2004 ; Vol. 340. pagg. 149-152.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: The flogosis markers currently in use show both low sensitivity and specificity, particularly in neoplastic and degenerative diseases. Procalcitonin (PCT) is a pro-peptide of calcitonin produced mainly but not only in the C-cells of the thyroid glands and, as several studies show, PCT levels in plasma increase during infections. Bacterial infections are also the main cause of death in oncological patients. Furthermore, in patients with leukaemia in chemotherapy recovery, infections often induce relapses. The aim of the present study is to detect PCT levels in plasma in oncohaematologic patients with and without infections. METHODS: The study was carried out on 54 patients by a quantitative automated immunoassay. RESULTS: PCT plasma levels > or =0.5 ng were detected in 27 out of 30 patients (90,0{\%}) with bacterial infections; 8 out of 9 patients (88,9{\%}) with viral infections and in 12 out of 15 patients in the control group without statistically significant differences. CONCLUSIONS: The results, which differ from those in the literature, are discussed.",
author = "{Ciaccio M; Fugardi G; Titone L; Romano A; Giordano S; Bivona G; Vocca L; Scarlata F; Di Gangi M} and {Titone Lanza Di Scalea}, Lucina and Francesco Scarlata and Maria Fugardi and Marcello Ciaccio and Giulia Bivona and {Di Gangi}, {Maria Chiara} and Lavinia Vocca",
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language = "English",
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T1 - Procalcitonin levels in plasma in oncohaematologic patients with and without bacterial infections.

AU - Ciaccio M; Fugardi G; Titone L; Romano A; Giordano S; Bivona G; Vocca L; Scarlata F; Di Gangi M

AU - Titone Lanza Di Scalea, Lucina

AU - Scarlata, Francesco

AU - Fugardi, Maria

AU - Ciaccio, Marcello

AU - Bivona, Giulia

AU - Di Gangi, Maria Chiara

AU - Vocca, Lavinia

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - BACKGROUND: The flogosis markers currently in use show both low sensitivity and specificity, particularly in neoplastic and degenerative diseases. Procalcitonin (PCT) is a pro-peptide of calcitonin produced mainly but not only in the C-cells of the thyroid glands and, as several studies show, PCT levels in plasma increase during infections. Bacterial infections are also the main cause of death in oncological patients. Furthermore, in patients with leukaemia in chemotherapy recovery, infections often induce relapses. The aim of the present study is to detect PCT levels in plasma in oncohaematologic patients with and without infections. METHODS: The study was carried out on 54 patients by a quantitative automated immunoassay. RESULTS: PCT plasma levels > or =0.5 ng were detected in 27 out of 30 patients (90,0%) with bacterial infections; 8 out of 9 patients (88,9%) with viral infections and in 12 out of 15 patients in the control group without statistically significant differences. CONCLUSIONS: The results, which differ from those in the literature, are discussed.

AB - BACKGROUND: The flogosis markers currently in use show both low sensitivity and specificity, particularly in neoplastic and degenerative diseases. Procalcitonin (PCT) is a pro-peptide of calcitonin produced mainly but not only in the C-cells of the thyroid glands and, as several studies show, PCT levels in plasma increase during infections. Bacterial infections are also the main cause of death in oncological patients. Furthermore, in patients with leukaemia in chemotherapy recovery, infections often induce relapses. The aim of the present study is to detect PCT levels in plasma in oncohaematologic patients with and without infections. METHODS: The study was carried out on 54 patients by a quantitative automated immunoassay. RESULTS: PCT plasma levels > or =0.5 ng were detected in 27 out of 30 patients (90,0%) with bacterial infections; 8 out of 9 patients (88,9%) with viral infections and in 12 out of 15 patients in the control group without statistically significant differences. CONCLUSIONS: The results, which differ from those in the literature, are discussed.

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/1848

M3 - Article

VL - 340

SP - 149

EP - 152

JO - Clinica Chimica Acta

JF - Clinica Chimica Acta

SN - 0009-8981

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