Palaeogeographical evolution of the Egadi Islands (western Sicily, Italy). Implications for late Pleistocene and early Holocene sea crossings by humans and other mammals in the western Mediterranean

Pietro Renda, Attilio Sulli, Fabrizio Pepe, Valerio Agnesi, Stefano Furlani, Gianluca Quarta, Di Patti, Sara Biolchi, Valeria Lo Presti, Donati, Merizzi, Agnesi, Sebastiano Tusa, Fabrizio Antonioli, Mariarita Palombo, Lucio Calcagnile, Carolina Di Patti

Risultato della ricerca: Articlepeer review

8 Citazioni (Scopus)

Abstract

The continental shelf morphology offshore of western Sicily suggests that during the Last Glacial Maximum(LGM, 20 ka cal BP), two of the Egadi Islands, Favignana and Levanzo, were connected to Sicily by a wideemerged plain, while Marettimo was only separated from the other islands by a narrow channel. We studied therelative sea-level variation from the LGM until today, focussing on two important time slices: the Mesolithic(9.5–13 ka cal BP) and the Neolithic (6.5–7.5 ka cal BP). In this research, we discuss a sea-level rise model bymeans of geomorphological, archaeological and geophysical observations and new radiocarbon dating of marineand terrestrial fossil fauna. The results enabled us to provide a detailed palaeogeographical reconstruction of thefocal area from the LGM until they became isolated. The evidence that has emerged from this research, inparticular the radiometric data, supports the hypothesis that seafaring in the western Mediterranean area mayhave started between the early Mesolithic and late Epigravettian (between 8.4 and 13.5 ka cal BP), although itprobably became a well-established practice only during the Neolithic.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)160-181
Numero di pagine22
RivistaEarth-Science Reviews
Volume194
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

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