NUTRITION, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND INTESTINAL DYSBIOSIS: INFLUENCE OF DIET ON GUT MICROBIOTA IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES.

Giovanni Tomasello, Giovanni Zummo, Francesco Cappello, Felicia Farina, Angelo Leone, Francesco Carini, Emanuele Sinagra, Tarek Bou Assi, Alice Gerges Geagea, Giovanni Tomasello, Abdo Jurjus, Francesco Cappello

Risultato della ricerca: Article

18 Citazioni (Scopus)

Abstract

Microbiota refers to the population of microorganism (bacteria, viruses and fungi) that inhabit the entire gastrointestinal tract, more particularly the colon whose role is to maintain the integrity of the intestinal mucosa and control the proliferation of pathogenic bacteria. Alteration in the composition of the gut microbiota is called dysbiosis. Dysbiosis redisposes to inflammatory bowe diseases such ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease and indeterminated colitis. The purpose of this literature review is to elucidate the influence of diet on the composition of the gastrointestinal microbiota in the healthy gut and the role of diet in the development of dysbiosis. The "western diet", in particular a low-fiber high/fat carboydrate diet is one factor that can lead to severe dysbiosis. in contrast, "mediterranean diet" and vegetearian diets that includes abundant fruits, vegetables, olive oil and oily fish are known for their anti-inflammatory effects and could prevent dysbiosis and subsequent inflammatory bowel disease.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)461-466
Numero di pagine6
RivistaDefault journal
Volume4
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2016

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Dysbiosis
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Oxidative Stress
Diet
Mediterranean Diet
Bacteria
Plant Oils
Microbiota
High Fat Diet
Colitis
Intestinal Mucosa
Ulcerative Colitis
Crohn Disease
Gastrointestinal Tract
Fruit
Colon
Fishes
Fungi
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Gastrointestinal Microbiome

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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NUTRITION, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND INTESTINAL DYSBIOSIS: INFLUENCE OF DIET ON GUT MICROBIOTA IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES. / Tomasello, Giovanni; Zummo, Giovanni; Cappello, Francesco; Farina, Felicia; Leone, Angelo; Carini, Francesco; Sinagra, Emanuele; Assi, Tarek Bou; Geagea, Alice Gerges; Tomasello, Giovanni; Jurjus, Abdo; Cappello, Francesco.

In: Default journal, Vol. 4, 2016, pag. 461-466.

Risultato della ricerca: Article

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AU - Zummo, Giovanni

AU - Cappello, Francesco

AU - Farina, Felicia

AU - Leone, Angelo

AU - Carini, Francesco

AU - Sinagra, Emanuele

AU - Assi, Tarek Bou

AU - Geagea, Alice Gerges

AU - Tomasello, Giovanni

AU - Jurjus, Abdo

AU - Cappello, Francesco

PY - 2016

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AB - Microbiota refers to the population of microorganism (bacteria, viruses and fungi) that inhabit the entire gastrointestinal tract, more particularly the colon whose role is to maintain the integrity of the intestinal mucosa and control the proliferation of pathogenic bacteria. Alteration in the composition of the gut microbiota is called dysbiosis. Dysbiosis redisposes to inflammatory bowe diseases such ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease and indeterminated colitis. The purpose of this literature review is to elucidate the influence of diet on the composition of the gastrointestinal microbiota in the healthy gut and the role of diet in the development of dysbiosis. The "western diet", in particular a low-fiber high/fat carboydrate diet is one factor that can lead to severe dysbiosis. in contrast, "mediterranean diet" and vegetearian diets that includes abundant fruits, vegetables, olive oil and oily fish are known for their anti-inflammatory effects and could prevent dysbiosis and subsequent inflammatory bowel disease.

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