Mediterranean Neighbourhoods: Is There an Alternative Governance Model for Local Identities?

Risultato della ricerca: Other

Abstract

Back in 2002, Le Galès acknowledged that European cities are composed of increasingly diverse socialand cultural groups. As Beck and many others state, most world cities are experiencing a deep change, due to cosmopolitanism and globalization.However, there is one scale of analysis that might at first appear entirely unrelated to the new emergingspatialities (conurbations, city regions, post-metropolises). This scale is the neighbourhood, which looks like a relic of a now lost time. The authors believe that neighbourhoods host the majority of urban social (sometimes‘insurgent’) movements, along with interesting negotiations of governance processes: therefore, they cannot be rejected as useless and outdated realities, even within contemporary European cities.The main topic the authors discuss concerns the applicability of the traditional Anglo-American notion of neighbourhood to Mediterranean cities. Is globalization determining the diffusion of just one model of neighbourhood (i.e. the Anglo-American) all over the world? Or is there a distinctive Mediterranean model of local identities for our cities?Starting from the analysis of case studies from Italy and Spain, the paper suggests the need of describing Mediterranean neighbourhoods in a new way, while strengthening their role as the ‘connecting ground between private and public spaces’ (de Certeau).
Lingua originaleEnglish
Pagine206-206
Numero di pagine1
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2013

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governance
globalization
cosmopolitanism
metropolis
public space
Social Movements
Italy
Spain
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title = "Mediterranean Neighbourhoods: Is There an Alternative Governance Model for Local Identities?",
abstract = "Back in 2002, Le Gal{\`e}s acknowledged that European cities are composed of increasingly diverse socialand cultural groups. As Beck and many others state, most world cities are experiencing a deep change, due to cosmopolitanism and globalization.However, there is one scale of analysis that might at first appear entirely unrelated to the new emergingspatialities (conurbations, city regions, post-metropolises). This scale is the neighbourhood, which looks like a relic of a now lost time. The authors believe that neighbourhoods host the majority of urban social (sometimes‘insurgent’) movements, along with interesting negotiations of governance processes: therefore, they cannot be rejected as useless and outdated realities, even within contemporary European cities.The main topic the authors discuss concerns the applicability of the traditional Anglo-American notion of neighbourhood to Mediterranean cities. Is globalization determining the diffusion of just one model of neighbourhood (i.e. the Anglo-American) all over the world? Or is there a distinctive Mediterranean model of local identities for our cities?Starting from the analysis of case studies from Italy and Spain, the paper suggests the need of describing Mediterranean neighbourhoods in a new way, while strengthening their role as the ‘connecting ground between private and public spaces’ (de Certeau).",
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AB - Back in 2002, Le Galès acknowledged that European cities are composed of increasingly diverse socialand cultural groups. As Beck and many others state, most world cities are experiencing a deep change, due to cosmopolitanism and globalization.However, there is one scale of analysis that might at first appear entirely unrelated to the new emergingspatialities (conurbations, city regions, post-metropolises). This scale is the neighbourhood, which looks like a relic of a now lost time. The authors believe that neighbourhoods host the majority of urban social (sometimes‘insurgent’) movements, along with interesting negotiations of governance processes: therefore, they cannot be rejected as useless and outdated realities, even within contemporary European cities.The main topic the authors discuss concerns the applicability of the traditional Anglo-American notion of neighbourhood to Mediterranean cities. Is globalization determining the diffusion of just one model of neighbourhood (i.e. the Anglo-American) all over the world? Or is there a distinctive Mediterranean model of local identities for our cities?Starting from the analysis of case studies from Italy and Spain, the paper suggests the need of describing Mediterranean neighbourhoods in a new way, while strengthening their role as the ‘connecting ground between private and public spaces’ (de Certeau).

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