Marine organisms as source of bioactive molecules applied in restoration projects

Maria Giovanna Parisi, Matteo Cammarata, Maria Rosa Trapani, Franco Palla, Enza Di Carlo, Matteo Cammarata, Maria Giovanna Parisi, Giovanna Benedetta Barresi, Maria Francesca Mule'

Risultato della ricerca: Article

9 Citazioni (Scopus)

Abstract

In recent decades research in the conservation and restoration field has provided sustainable alternatives totraditional procedures for cleaning or controlling the microbial colonization of works of art. In the present study,for the first time novel bioactive molecules extracted from marine invertebrate organisms (Anthozoa) were testedinstead of chemical compounds for removing protein layers or as a biocide for controlling fungal or bacterialcolonization. In particular, Bioactive Molecules with Protease activity (BMP), acting in a temperature range of 4- 30°C,were tested for the hydrolysis of protein layers on laboratory specimens. The cleaning protocol provides a selectiveprocedure to avoid damage to the original materials constituting the heritage object.Concurrently, enzymatic cleaning was also performed using commercial Protease from Aspergillus sojae (Type XIX),in order to compare their hydrolytic activities. Bioactive Molecules with Antimicrobial activity (BMA1, BMA2) weretested to control bacterial (Bacillus, Micrococcus) or fungal (Aspergillus, Penicillium) growth, previously isolated fromcolonized canvas samples and characterized by an integrated approach based on in vitro culture, microscopy andmolecular investigations. These molecules were tested to define the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) andMinimal Bactericidal/ Fungicidal Concentration (MBC/MFC). Specifically, BMAs were used to control fungal growthduring the relining of the painting (laboratory specimens), carried out using a canvas support, and glue paste asbinder.In our hypothesis, these molecules provide an important contribution to the development of innovative protocolsfor biocleaning or microbial growth control, based on fast and easy application, operator friendly andenvironmentally sustainable molecules.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)17-20
Numero di pagine4
RivistaHeritage Science
Volume3
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2015

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restoration
work of art
colonization
damages
conservation
Molecules
Restoration
Organism
Cleaning
Protein
Layer
Canvas
Protease

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Conservation
  • Archaeology
  • Archaeology

Cita questo

Marine organisms as source of bioactive molecules applied in restoration projects. / Parisi, Maria Giovanna; Cammarata, Matteo; Trapani, Maria Rosa; Palla, Franco; Di Carlo, Enza; Cammarata, Matteo; Parisi, Maria Giovanna; Barresi, Giovanna Benedetta; Mule', Maria Francesca.

In: Heritage Science, Vol. 3, 2015, pag. 17-20.

Risultato della ricerca: Article

Parisi, Maria Giovanna ; Cammarata, Matteo ; Trapani, Maria Rosa ; Palla, Franco ; Di Carlo, Enza ; Cammarata, Matteo ; Parisi, Maria Giovanna ; Barresi, Giovanna Benedetta ; Mule', Maria Francesca. / Marine organisms as source of bioactive molecules applied in restoration projects. In: Heritage Science. 2015 ; Vol. 3. pagg. 17-20.
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abstract = "In recent decades research in the conservation and restoration field has provided sustainable alternatives totraditional procedures for cleaning or controlling the microbial colonization of works of art. In the present study,for the first time novel bioactive molecules extracted from marine invertebrate organisms (Anthozoa) were testedinstead of chemical compounds for removing protein layers or as a biocide for controlling fungal or bacterialcolonization. In particular, Bioactive Molecules with Protease activity (BMP), acting in a temperature range of 4- 30°C,were tested for the hydrolysis of protein layers on laboratory specimens. The cleaning protocol provides a selectiveprocedure to avoid damage to the original materials constituting the heritage object.Concurrently, enzymatic cleaning was also performed using commercial Protease from Aspergillus sojae (Type XIX),in order to compare their hydrolytic activities. Bioactive Molecules with Antimicrobial activity (BMA1, BMA2) weretested to control bacterial (Bacillus, Micrococcus) or fungal (Aspergillus, Penicillium) growth, previously isolated fromcolonized canvas samples and characterized by an integrated approach based on in vitro culture, microscopy andmolecular investigations. These molecules were tested to define the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) andMinimal Bactericidal/ Fungicidal Concentration (MBC/MFC). Specifically, BMAs were used to control fungal growthduring the relining of the painting (laboratory specimens), carried out using a canvas support, and glue paste asbinder.In our hypothesis, these molecules provide an important contribution to the development of innovative protocolsfor biocleaning or microbial growth control, based on fast and easy application, operator friendly andenvironmentally sustainable molecules.",
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