Macrofungi as ecosystem resources: Conservation versus exploitation

Giuseppe Venturella, Maria Letizia Gargano, Venanzoni, Elias Polemis, Maggi, Persiani, Lunghini, Georgios I. Zervakis, Zotti, Vizzini, Angelini, Pavarino, Granito, Di Piazza, Donnini, Elia Ambrosio

Risultato della ricerca: Article

24 Citazioni (Scopus)

Abstract

Fungi are organisms of significant importance not only for the crucial roles they undertake in nature but also for many human activities that are strictly dependent on them. Indeed, fungi possess fundamental positions in ecosystems functioning including nutrient cycles and wood decomposition. As concerns human-related activities, edible and non-edible mushrooms are also involved and/or exploited in forestry, pharmaceutical industry and food production; hence, nowadays they represent a major economic source worldwide. In order to maintain and improve their strategic importance, several conservation strategies, such as habitat preservation, are needed. This article reports several contributions inherent to the relationships between wood-decaying fungi, edible and non-edible mushrooms and their potential exploitation as non-timber forest products and genetic resources.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)219-225
Numero di pagine7
RivistaPlant Biosystems
Volume147
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2013

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natural resources conservation
fungus
edible fungi
fungi
decayed wood
ecosystems
ecosystem
habitat conservation
genetic resources
food production
mushrooms
biogeochemical cycles
forestry
pharmaceutical industry
genetic resource
mushroom
economics
organisms
decomposition
habitat

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Plant Science

Cita questo

Venturella, G., Gargano, M. L., Venanzoni, Polemis, E., Maggi, Persiani, ... Ambrosio, E. (2013). Macrofungi as ecosystem resources: Conservation versus exploitation. Plant Biosystems, 147, 219-225.

Macrofungi as ecosystem resources: Conservation versus exploitation. / Venturella, Giuseppe; Gargano, Maria Letizia; Venanzoni; Polemis, Elias; Maggi; Persiani; Lunghini; Zervakis, Georgios I.; Zotti; Vizzini; Angelini; Pavarino; Granito; Di Piazza; Donnini; Ambrosio, Elia.

In: Plant Biosystems, Vol. 147, 2013, pag. 219-225.

Risultato della ricerca: Article

Venturella, G, Gargano, ML, Venanzoni, Polemis, E, Maggi, Persiani, Lunghini, Zervakis, GI, Zotti, Vizzini, Angelini, Pavarino, Granito, Di Piazza, Donnini & Ambrosio, E 2013, 'Macrofungi as ecosystem resources: Conservation versus exploitation', Plant Biosystems, vol. 147, pagg. 219-225.
Venturella, Giuseppe ; Gargano, Maria Letizia ; Venanzoni ; Polemis, Elias ; Maggi ; Persiani ; Lunghini ; Zervakis, Georgios I. ; Zotti ; Vizzini ; Angelini ; Pavarino ; Granito ; Di Piazza ; Donnini ; Ambrosio, Elia. / Macrofungi as ecosystem resources: Conservation versus exploitation. In: Plant Biosystems. 2013 ; Vol. 147. pagg. 219-225.
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AU - Persiani, null

AU - Lunghini, null

AU - Zervakis, Georgios I.

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