Abstract

Metabolic syndrome (MetS) represents a combination of cardiometabolic risk factors, including visceral obesity, glucose intolerance or type 2 diabetes, elevated triglycerides, reduced HDL cholesterol, and hypertension. MetS is rapidly increasing in prevalence worldwide as a consequence of the "epidemic" obesity, with a considerable impact on the global incidence of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. At present, there is a growing interest on the role of visceral fat accumulation in the occurrence of MetS. In this review, the effects of adipocytokines and other proinflammatory factors produced by fat accumulation on the occurrence of the MetS have been also emphasized. Accordingly, the "hypoadiponectinemia" has been proposed as the most interesting new hypothesis to explain the pathophysiology of MetS.
Lingua originaleEnglish
Numero di pagine7
RivistaJournal of Nutrition and Metabolism
VolumeOnline
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2011

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Abdominal Obesity
metabolic syndrome
obesity
noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
adipokines
visceral fat
Adipokines
Glucose Intolerance
Intra-Abdominal Fat
pathophysiology
high density lipoprotein cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
hypertension
cardiovascular diseases
Triglycerides
Cardiovascular Diseases
risk factors
Obesity
Fats

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title = "Hypoadiponectinemia: A Link between Visceral Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome.",
abstract = "Metabolic syndrome (MetS) represents a combination of cardiometabolic risk factors, including visceral obesity, glucose intolerance or type 2 diabetes, elevated triglycerides, reduced HDL cholesterol, and hypertension. MetS is rapidly increasing in prevalence worldwide as a consequence of the {"}epidemic{"} obesity, with a considerable impact on the global incidence of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. At present, there is a growing interest on the role of visceral fat accumulation in the occurrence of MetS. In this review, the effects of adipocytokines and other proinflammatory factors produced by fat accumulation on the occurrence of the MetS have been also emphasized. Accordingly, the {"}hypoadiponectinemia{"} has been proposed as the most interesting new hypothesis to explain the pathophysiology of MetS.",
keywords = "Adiponectina, Obesit{\`a} Viscerale, Sindrome metabolica.",
author = "Rosario Scaglione and Salvatore Corrao and Giuseppe Licata and {Di Chiara}, Tiziana",
year = "2011",
language = "English",
volume = "Online",
journal = "Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism",
issn = "2090-0724",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Hypoadiponectinemia: A Link between Visceral Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome.

AU - Scaglione, Rosario

AU - Corrao, Salvatore

AU - Licata, Giuseppe

AU - Di Chiara, Tiziana

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Metabolic syndrome (MetS) represents a combination of cardiometabolic risk factors, including visceral obesity, glucose intolerance or type 2 diabetes, elevated triglycerides, reduced HDL cholesterol, and hypertension. MetS is rapidly increasing in prevalence worldwide as a consequence of the "epidemic" obesity, with a considerable impact on the global incidence of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. At present, there is a growing interest on the role of visceral fat accumulation in the occurrence of MetS. In this review, the effects of adipocytokines and other proinflammatory factors produced by fat accumulation on the occurrence of the MetS have been also emphasized. Accordingly, the "hypoadiponectinemia" has been proposed as the most interesting new hypothesis to explain the pathophysiology of MetS.

AB - Metabolic syndrome (MetS) represents a combination of cardiometabolic risk factors, including visceral obesity, glucose intolerance or type 2 diabetes, elevated triglycerides, reduced HDL cholesterol, and hypertension. MetS is rapidly increasing in prevalence worldwide as a consequence of the "epidemic" obesity, with a considerable impact on the global incidence of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. At present, there is a growing interest on the role of visceral fat accumulation in the occurrence of MetS. In this review, the effects of adipocytokines and other proinflammatory factors produced by fat accumulation on the occurrence of the MetS have been also emphasized. Accordingly, the "hypoadiponectinemia" has been proposed as the most interesting new hypothesis to explain the pathophysiology of MetS.

KW - Adiponectina

KW - Obesità Viscerale

KW - Sindrome metabolica.

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/61582

M3 - Article

VL - Online

JO - Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism

JF - Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism

SN - 2090-0724

ER -