High volume and low concentration of anaesthetic solution in the perivascular interscalene sheath determines quality of block and incidence of complications.

Michele D'Arienzo, Cuomo, Pippa, Michele D'Arienzo, Scarchini, Poggi, Panchetti

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Abstract

Background and objective: In the perivascular sheath of the brachial plexus, the volume of anaesthetic solution determines the quality of anaesthetic cover. Fibrous septa may divide the perivascular space into compartments, leading to inadequate diffusion of the anaesthetic solution. The aim of our study was to obtain good anaesthesia and less complications using high volume of low concentration anaesthetic solution, overcoming the obstacle of the septa with a double approach to the scalene sheath. Methods: Sixty patients scheduled for shoulder capsuloplasty received both Winnie interscalene brachial plexus block and Pippa proximal cranial needle approach. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups. A constant dose of local anaesthetic was administered to each group: Group I (30 patients) received high volume (60 mL of anaesthetic solution) and Group II (30 patients) received low volume of solution (30 mL of anaesthetic solution). Sensory and motor block in the upper limb and complications were evaluated. Results: In all the patients the quality of anaesthesia obtained at the surgical site was excellent. In Group I also the areas supplied by the medial cutaneous nerves of the arm and forearm, ulnar, median and radial nerves were blocked (P < 0.002). Complications were only observed in Group II and consisted of bradycardia and hypotension (66% of the patients) and phrenic nerve paresis (27%, of the patients). Conclusions: The lower concentration of the anaesthetic solution avoids complications while increased volume provides good analgesic cover. The combination of the Winnie interscalene plexus block and the Pippa proximal cranial needle approach should contribute to fill up the scalene sheath overcoming the septa obstacles.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)855-860
Numero di pagine6
RivistaEuropean Journal of Anaesthesiology
Volume23
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2006

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Anesthetics
Incidence
Needles
Anesthesia
Radial Nerve
Phrenic Nerve
Ulnar Nerve
Brachial Plexus
Median Nerve
Paresis
Bradycardia
Local Anesthetics
Forearm
Upper Extremity
Hypotension
Analgesics
Arm
Skin

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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title = "High volume and low concentration of anaesthetic solution in the perivascular interscalene sheath determines quality of block and incidence of complications.",
abstract = "Background and objective: In the perivascular sheath of the brachial plexus, the volume of anaesthetic solution determines the quality of anaesthetic cover. Fibrous septa may divide the perivascular space into compartments, leading to inadequate diffusion of the anaesthetic solution. The aim of our study was to obtain good anaesthesia and less complications using high volume of low concentration anaesthetic solution, overcoming the obstacle of the septa with a double approach to the scalene sheath. Methods: Sixty patients scheduled for shoulder capsuloplasty received both Winnie interscalene brachial plexus block and Pippa proximal cranial needle approach. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups. A constant dose of local anaesthetic was administered to each group: Group I (30 patients) received high volume (60 mL of anaesthetic solution) and Group II (30 patients) received low volume of solution (30 mL of anaesthetic solution). Sensory and motor block in the upper limb and complications were evaluated. Results: In all the patients the quality of anaesthesia obtained at the surgical site was excellent. In Group I also the areas supplied by the medial cutaneous nerves of the arm and forearm, ulnar, median and radial nerves were blocked (P < 0.002). Complications were only observed in Group II and consisted of bradycardia and hypotension (66{\%} of the patients) and phrenic nerve paresis (27{\%}, of the patients). Conclusions: The lower concentration of the anaesthetic solution avoids complications while increased volume provides good analgesic cover. The combination of the Winnie interscalene plexus block and the Pippa proximal cranial needle approach should contribute to fill up the scalene sheath overcoming the septa obstacles.",
author = "Michele D'Arienzo and Cuomo and Pippa and Michele D'Arienzo and Scarchini and Poggi and Panchetti",
year = "2006",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "855--860",
journal = "European Journal of Anaesthesiology",
issn = "0265-0215",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - High volume and low concentration of anaesthetic solution in the perivascular interscalene sheath determines quality of block and incidence of complications.

AU - D'Arienzo, Michele

AU - Cuomo, null

AU - Pippa, null

AU - D'Arienzo, Michele

AU - Scarchini, null

AU - Poggi, null

AU - Panchetti, null

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - Background and objective: In the perivascular sheath of the brachial plexus, the volume of anaesthetic solution determines the quality of anaesthetic cover. Fibrous septa may divide the perivascular space into compartments, leading to inadequate diffusion of the anaesthetic solution. The aim of our study was to obtain good anaesthesia and less complications using high volume of low concentration anaesthetic solution, overcoming the obstacle of the septa with a double approach to the scalene sheath. Methods: Sixty patients scheduled for shoulder capsuloplasty received both Winnie interscalene brachial plexus block and Pippa proximal cranial needle approach. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups. A constant dose of local anaesthetic was administered to each group: Group I (30 patients) received high volume (60 mL of anaesthetic solution) and Group II (30 patients) received low volume of solution (30 mL of anaesthetic solution). Sensory and motor block in the upper limb and complications were evaluated. Results: In all the patients the quality of anaesthesia obtained at the surgical site was excellent. In Group I also the areas supplied by the medial cutaneous nerves of the arm and forearm, ulnar, median and radial nerves were blocked (P < 0.002). Complications were only observed in Group II and consisted of bradycardia and hypotension (66% of the patients) and phrenic nerve paresis (27%, of the patients). Conclusions: The lower concentration of the anaesthetic solution avoids complications while increased volume provides good analgesic cover. The combination of the Winnie interscalene plexus block and the Pippa proximal cranial needle approach should contribute to fill up the scalene sheath overcoming the septa obstacles.

AB - Background and objective: In the perivascular sheath of the brachial plexus, the volume of anaesthetic solution determines the quality of anaesthetic cover. Fibrous septa may divide the perivascular space into compartments, leading to inadequate diffusion of the anaesthetic solution. The aim of our study was to obtain good anaesthesia and less complications using high volume of low concentration anaesthetic solution, overcoming the obstacle of the septa with a double approach to the scalene sheath. Methods: Sixty patients scheduled for shoulder capsuloplasty received both Winnie interscalene brachial plexus block and Pippa proximal cranial needle approach. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups. A constant dose of local anaesthetic was administered to each group: Group I (30 patients) received high volume (60 mL of anaesthetic solution) and Group II (30 patients) received low volume of solution (30 mL of anaesthetic solution). Sensory and motor block in the upper limb and complications were evaluated. Results: In all the patients the quality of anaesthesia obtained at the surgical site was excellent. In Group I also the areas supplied by the medial cutaneous nerves of the arm and forearm, ulnar, median and radial nerves were blocked (P < 0.002). Complications were only observed in Group II and consisted of bradycardia and hypotension (66% of the patients) and phrenic nerve paresis (27%, of the patients). Conclusions: The lower concentration of the anaesthetic solution avoids complications while increased volume provides good analgesic cover. The combination of the Winnie interscalene plexus block and the Pippa proximal cranial needle approach should contribute to fill up the scalene sheath overcoming the septa obstacles.

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/17498

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 855

EP - 860

JO - European Journal of Anaesthesiology

JF - European Journal of Anaesthesiology

SN - 0265-0215

ER -