“Hidden invaders” conquer the Sicily Channel and knock on the door of the Western Mediterranean sea

Antonio Caruso, Claudia Cosentino, Martin R. Langer, Anna E. Weinmann, Julian Evans, Roberta Guastella, Nicoletta Mancin, Agnese Marchini

Risultato della ricerca: Article

Abstract

This study updates the current distribution, range expansion and establishment status of the non-indigenous species Amphistegina lobifera Larsen, 1976 and other foraminifera that are cryptogenic in the Sicily Channel.Prior to this study, amphisteginids were reported from the Levantine Basin, the Central Mediterranean (Tunisia, Malta, Pelagian islands) and the southern Adriatic Sea. Here, we provide new records documenting a north-western expansion in the Central Mediterranean. In summer-autumn 2017 and spring-summer 2018, we collected algae and sediment samples from shallow coastal habitats along the shores of the Maltese archipelago, southern and north-western Sicily, Pantelleria and the Aegadian islands. Analysis of the foraminiferal assemblages showed that A. lobifera is effectively established around Malta and in southern/south-eastern Sicily, and has reached the oceanographic boundary between the Central and Western Mediterranean.Our results also show that the thermotolerant A. lobifera is at an advanced stage of invasion in the Sicily Channel, probably favoured by a recent rise in Mediterranean sea surface temperatures. New species distribution models are provided for the years 2040-2050 and 2090-2100, indicating that the predicted warming trend will facilitate north-westward migration of Mediterranean amphisteginids along the coast of northern Africa into the Alboran Sea, and deep into the Adriatic Sea.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)106234-
Numero di pagine12
RivistaEstuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science
Volume225
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2019

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Sicily
Mediterranean Sea
Malta
range expansion
summer
algae
new record
foraminifera
archipelago
sea surface temperature
warming
autumn
alga
new species
coast
Northern Africa
habitat
Tunisia
basin
sediment

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science

Cita questo

“Hidden invaders” conquer the Sicily Channel and knock on the door of the Western Mediterranean sea. / Caruso, Antonio; Cosentino, Claudia; Langer, Martin R.; Weinmann, Anna E.; Evans, Julian; Guastella, Roberta; Mancin, Nicoletta; Marchini, Agnese.

In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, Vol. 225, 2019, pag. 106234-.

Risultato della ricerca: Article

Caruso, A, Cosentino, C, Langer, MR, Weinmann, AE, Evans, J, Guastella, R, Mancin, N & Marchini, A 2019, '“Hidden invaders” conquer the Sicily Channel and knock on the door of the Western Mediterranean sea', Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, vol. 225, pagg. 106234-.
Caruso, Antonio ; Cosentino, Claudia ; Langer, Martin R. ; Weinmann, Anna E. ; Evans, Julian ; Guastella, Roberta ; Mancin, Nicoletta ; Marchini, Agnese. / “Hidden invaders” conquer the Sicily Channel and knock on the door of the Western Mediterranean sea. In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science. 2019 ; Vol. 225. pagg. 106234-.
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abstract = "This study updates the current distribution, range expansion and establishment status of the non-indigenous species Amphistegina lobifera Larsen, 1976 and other foraminifera that are cryptogenic in the Sicily Channel.Prior to this study, amphisteginids were reported from the Levantine Basin, the Central Mediterranean (Tunisia, Malta, Pelagian islands) and the southern Adriatic Sea. Here, we provide new records documenting a north-western expansion in the Central Mediterranean. In summer-autumn 2017 and spring-summer 2018, we collected algae and sediment samples from shallow coastal habitats along the shores of the Maltese archipelago, southern and north-western Sicily, Pantelleria and the Aegadian islands. Analysis of the foraminiferal assemblages showed that A. lobifera is effectively established around Malta and in southern/south-eastern Sicily, and has reached the oceanographic boundary between the Central and Western Mediterranean.Our results also show that the thermotolerant A. lobifera is at an advanced stage of invasion in the Sicily Channel, probably favoured by a recent rise in Mediterranean sea surface temperatures. New species distribution models are provided for the years 2040-2050 and 2090-2100, indicating that the predicted warming trend will facilitate north-westward migration of Mediterranean amphisteginids along the coast of northern Africa into the Alboran Sea, and deep into the Adriatic Sea.",
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