Abstract

Background Recurrent aphthosis is a common oral ulcerative condition consisting also of a subset of similar ulcers, properly named 'aphthous-like' ulcers (ALU), linked to systemic diseases and among these, to iron, folic acid and vitamin B(12) deficiencies. Objectives The main objectives of this study were: (i) to evaluate the association between recurrent aphthosis and the most common predisposing factors; (ii) to assess the frequency of ALU in recurrent aphthosis; (iii) to verify the efficacy of a replacement therapy in all ALU patients. Methods Thirty-two adults with recurrent aphthosis and 29 otherwise healthy controls were consecutively recruited, interviewed and subjected to haematological investigations. Results Family history of recurrent aphthosis was significantly associated (P < 0.01). The overall frequency of haematinic deficiencies was 56.2% in recurrent aphthosis patients vs. 7% in controls (P < 0.0001). All ALU patients with a negative family history showed a complete remission of the ulcerative episodes after replacement therapy, while those with a positive family history only had a reduction in frequency and severity. In the logistic regression model, only family history was associated with recurrent aphthosis (P = 0.0137). Conclusion The strong association with familiarity, the unexpected higher frequency of ALU (compared with the idiopathic variant) and the good response to replacement therapy means that familiarity should always be investigated. Furthermore, routine haematological screening and tests for serum iron, folic acid and vitamin B(12) deficiencies should be assessed in all patients with recurrent aphthosis to treat any nutritional deficiency and to prevent more important related systemic manifestations.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)667-673
Numero di pagine7
RivistaJournal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology
Volume2010
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2010

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Vitamin B 12 Deficiency
Folic Acid
Ulcer
Iron
Logistic Models
Hematinics
Hematologic Tests
Malnutrition
Causality
Therapeutics
Serum
Recognition (Psychology)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dermatology
  • Infectious Diseases

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@article{d6a2a13439844e3f868670704aa16008,
title = "Haematological deficiencies in patients with recurrent aphthosis",
abstract = "Background Recurrent aphthosis is a common oral ulcerative condition consisting also of a subset of similar ulcers, properly named 'aphthous-like' ulcers (ALU), linked to systemic diseases and among these, to iron, folic acid and vitamin B(12) deficiencies. Objectives The main objectives of this study were: (i) to evaluate the association between recurrent aphthosis and the most common predisposing factors; (ii) to assess the frequency of ALU in recurrent aphthosis; (iii) to verify the efficacy of a replacement therapy in all ALU patients. Methods Thirty-two adults with recurrent aphthosis and 29 otherwise healthy controls were consecutively recruited, interviewed and subjected to haematological investigations. Results Family history of recurrent aphthosis was significantly associated (P < 0.01). The overall frequency of haematinic deficiencies was 56.2{\%} in recurrent aphthosis patients vs. 7{\%} in controls (P < 0.0001). All ALU patients with a negative family history showed a complete remission of the ulcerative episodes after replacement therapy, while those with a positive family history only had a reduction in frequency and severity. In the logistic regression model, only family history was associated with recurrent aphthosis (P = 0.0137). Conclusion The strong association with familiarity, the unexpected higher frequency of ALU (compared with the idiopathic variant) and the good response to replacement therapy means that familiarity should always be investigated. Furthermore, routine haematological screening and tests for serum iron, folic acid and vitamin B(12) deficiencies should be assessed in all patients with recurrent aphthosis to treat any nutritional deficiency and to prevent more important related systemic manifestations.",
keywords = "anaemia, aphthous, folic acid deficiency, iron deficiency, oral ulcers, stomatitis, vitamin B12 deficiency",
author = "Giuseppina Campisi and {Di Fede}, Gaetana and Antonio Carroccio and Domenico Compilato and Calvino, {Francesco Maria}",
year = "2010",
language = "English",
volume = "2010",
pages = "667--673",
journal = "Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology",
issn = "0926-9959",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Haematological deficiencies in patients with recurrent aphthosis

AU - Campisi, Giuseppina

AU - Di Fede, Gaetana

AU - Carroccio, Antonio

AU - Compilato, Domenico

AU - Calvino, Francesco Maria

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Background Recurrent aphthosis is a common oral ulcerative condition consisting also of a subset of similar ulcers, properly named 'aphthous-like' ulcers (ALU), linked to systemic diseases and among these, to iron, folic acid and vitamin B(12) deficiencies. Objectives The main objectives of this study were: (i) to evaluate the association between recurrent aphthosis and the most common predisposing factors; (ii) to assess the frequency of ALU in recurrent aphthosis; (iii) to verify the efficacy of a replacement therapy in all ALU patients. Methods Thirty-two adults with recurrent aphthosis and 29 otherwise healthy controls were consecutively recruited, interviewed and subjected to haematological investigations. Results Family history of recurrent aphthosis was significantly associated (P < 0.01). The overall frequency of haematinic deficiencies was 56.2% in recurrent aphthosis patients vs. 7% in controls (P < 0.0001). All ALU patients with a negative family history showed a complete remission of the ulcerative episodes after replacement therapy, while those with a positive family history only had a reduction in frequency and severity. In the logistic regression model, only family history was associated with recurrent aphthosis (P = 0.0137). Conclusion The strong association with familiarity, the unexpected higher frequency of ALU (compared with the idiopathic variant) and the good response to replacement therapy means that familiarity should always be investigated. Furthermore, routine haematological screening and tests for serum iron, folic acid and vitamin B(12) deficiencies should be assessed in all patients with recurrent aphthosis to treat any nutritional deficiency and to prevent more important related systemic manifestations.

AB - Background Recurrent aphthosis is a common oral ulcerative condition consisting also of a subset of similar ulcers, properly named 'aphthous-like' ulcers (ALU), linked to systemic diseases and among these, to iron, folic acid and vitamin B(12) deficiencies. Objectives The main objectives of this study were: (i) to evaluate the association between recurrent aphthosis and the most common predisposing factors; (ii) to assess the frequency of ALU in recurrent aphthosis; (iii) to verify the efficacy of a replacement therapy in all ALU patients. Methods Thirty-two adults with recurrent aphthosis and 29 otherwise healthy controls were consecutively recruited, interviewed and subjected to haematological investigations. Results Family history of recurrent aphthosis was significantly associated (P < 0.01). The overall frequency of haematinic deficiencies was 56.2% in recurrent aphthosis patients vs. 7% in controls (P < 0.0001). All ALU patients with a negative family history showed a complete remission of the ulcerative episodes after replacement therapy, while those with a positive family history only had a reduction in frequency and severity. In the logistic regression model, only family history was associated with recurrent aphthosis (P = 0.0137). Conclusion The strong association with familiarity, the unexpected higher frequency of ALU (compared with the idiopathic variant) and the good response to replacement therapy means that familiarity should always be investigated. Furthermore, routine haematological screening and tests for serum iron, folic acid and vitamin B(12) deficiencies should be assessed in all patients with recurrent aphthosis to treat any nutritional deficiency and to prevent more important related systemic manifestations.

KW - anaemia

KW - aphthous

KW - folic acid deficiency

KW - iron deficiency

KW - oral ulcers

KW - stomatitis

KW - vitamin B12 deficiency

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/50518

M3 - Article

VL - 2010

SP - 667

EP - 673

JO - Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology

JF - Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology

SN - 0926-9959

ER -