Gut microbiota imbalance and chaperoning system malfunction are central to ulcerative colitis pathogenesis and can be counteracted with specifically designed probiotics: a working hypothesis.

Francesca Rappa, Antonella Marino Gammazza, Francesco Cappello, Giovanni Tomasello, Giovanni Zummo, Attilio Ignazio Lo Monte, Marcello Romeo, Claudia Campanella, Claudia Campanella, Antonella Marino Gammazza, Maurizio Bellavia, Massimo Cocchi, Luciano Lozio, Francesca Rappa, Giovanni Tomasello, Francesco Cappello, Everly Conway De Macario, Alberto J. L. Macario, Provvidenza Damiani

Risultato della ricerca: Article

31 Citazioni (Scopus)

Abstract

In this work, we propose that for further studies of the physiopathology and treatment for inflammatory bowel diseases, an integral view of the conditions, including the triad of microbiota-heat shock proteins (HSPs)-probiotics, ought to be considered. Microbiota is the complex microbial flora that resides in the gut, affecting not only gut functions but also the health status of the whole body. Alteration in the microbiota's composition has been implicated in a variety of pathological conditions (e.g., ulcerative colitis, UC), involving both gut and extra-intestinal tissues and organs. Some of these pathologies are also associated with an altered expression of HSPs (chaperones) and this is the reason why they may be considered chaperonopathies. Probiotics, which are live microorganisms able to restore the correct, healthy equilibrium of microbiota composition, can ameliorate symptoms in patients suffering from UC and modulate expression levels of HSPs. However, currently probiotic therapy follows ex-adiuvantibus criteria, i.e., treatments with beneficial effects but whose mechanism of action is unknown, which should be changed so the probiotics needed in each case are predetermined on the basis of the patient's microbiota. Consequently, efforts are necessary to develop diagnostic tools for elucidating levels and distribution of HSPs and the microbiota composition (microbiota fingerprint) of each subject and, thus, guide specific probiotic therapy, tailored to meet the needs of the patient. Microbiota fingerprinting ought to include molecular biology techniques for sequencing highly conserved DNA, e.g., genes encoding 16S RNA, for species identification and, in addition, quantification of each relevant microbe.
Lingua originaleEnglish
Numero di pagine0
RivistaDefault journal
Volume202
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2013

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Microbiota
Probiotics
Ulcerative Colitis
Heat-Shock Proteins
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Dermatoglyphics
Therapeutics
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Health Status
Molecular Biology
RNA
Pathology
DNA
Genes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cita questo

Gut microbiota imbalance and chaperoning system malfunction are central to ulcerative colitis pathogenesis and can be counteracted with specifically designed probiotics: a working hypothesis. / Rappa, Francesca; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Cappello, Francesco; Tomasello, Giovanni; Zummo, Giovanni; Lo Monte, Attilio Ignazio; Romeo, Marcello; Campanella, Claudia; Campanella, Claudia; Gammazza, Antonella Marino; Bellavia, Maurizio; Cocchi, Massimo; Lozio, Luciano; Rappa, Francesca; Tomasello, Giovanni; Cappello, Francesco; Conway De Macario, Everly; Macario, Alberto J. L.; Damiani, Provvidenza.

In: Default journal, Vol. 202, 2013.

Risultato della ricerca: Article

Rappa, Francesca ; Marino Gammazza, Antonella ; Cappello, Francesco ; Tomasello, Giovanni ; Zummo, Giovanni ; Lo Monte, Attilio Ignazio ; Romeo, Marcello ; Campanella, Claudia ; Campanella, Claudia ; Gammazza, Antonella Marino ; Bellavia, Maurizio ; Cocchi, Massimo ; Lozio, Luciano ; Rappa, Francesca ; Tomasello, Giovanni ; Cappello, Francesco ; Conway De Macario, Everly ; Macario, Alberto J. L. ; Damiani, Provvidenza. / Gut microbiota imbalance and chaperoning system malfunction are central to ulcerative colitis pathogenesis and can be counteracted with specifically designed probiotics: a working hypothesis. In: Default journal. 2013 ; Vol. 202.
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abstract = "In this work, we propose that for further studies of the physiopathology and treatment for inflammatory bowel diseases, an integral view of the conditions, including the triad of microbiota-heat shock proteins (HSPs)-probiotics, ought to be considered. Microbiota is the complex microbial flora that resides in the gut, affecting not only gut functions but also the health status of the whole body. Alteration in the microbiota's composition has been implicated in a variety of pathological conditions (e.g., ulcerative colitis, UC), involving both gut and extra-intestinal tissues and organs. Some of these pathologies are also associated with an altered expression of HSPs (chaperones) and this is the reason why they may be considered chaperonopathies. Probiotics, which are live microorganisms able to restore the correct, healthy equilibrium of microbiota composition, can ameliorate symptoms in patients suffering from UC and modulate expression levels of HSPs. However, currently probiotic therapy follows ex-adiuvantibus criteria, i.e., treatments with beneficial effects but whose mechanism of action is unknown, which should be changed so the probiotics needed in each case are predetermined on the basis of the patient's microbiota. Consequently, efforts are necessary to develop diagnostic tools for elucidating levels and distribution of HSPs and the microbiota composition (microbiota fingerprint) of each subject and, thus, guide specific probiotic therapy, tailored to meet the needs of the patient. Microbiota fingerprinting ought to include molecular biology techniques for sequencing highly conserved DNA, e.g., genes encoding 16S RNA, for species identification and, in addition, quantification of each relevant microbe.",
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AU - Rappa, Francesca

AU - Marino Gammazza, Antonella

AU - Cappello, Francesco

AU - Tomasello, Giovanni

AU - Zummo, Giovanni

AU - Lo Monte, Attilio Ignazio

AU - Romeo, Marcello

AU - Campanella, Claudia

AU - Campanella, Claudia

AU - Gammazza, Antonella Marino

AU - Bellavia, Maurizio

AU - Cocchi, Massimo

AU - Lozio, Luciano

AU - Rappa, Francesca

AU - Tomasello, Giovanni

AU - Cappello, Francesco

AU - Conway De Macario, Everly

AU - Macario, Alberto J. L.

AU - Damiani, Provvidenza

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - In this work, we propose that for further studies of the physiopathology and treatment for inflammatory bowel diseases, an integral view of the conditions, including the triad of microbiota-heat shock proteins (HSPs)-probiotics, ought to be considered. Microbiota is the complex microbial flora that resides in the gut, affecting not only gut functions but also the health status of the whole body. Alteration in the microbiota's composition has been implicated in a variety of pathological conditions (e.g., ulcerative colitis, UC), involving both gut and extra-intestinal tissues and organs. Some of these pathologies are also associated with an altered expression of HSPs (chaperones) and this is the reason why they may be considered chaperonopathies. Probiotics, which are live microorganisms able to restore the correct, healthy equilibrium of microbiota composition, can ameliorate symptoms in patients suffering from UC and modulate expression levels of HSPs. However, currently probiotic therapy follows ex-adiuvantibus criteria, i.e., treatments with beneficial effects but whose mechanism of action is unknown, which should be changed so the probiotics needed in each case are predetermined on the basis of the patient's microbiota. Consequently, efforts are necessary to develop diagnostic tools for elucidating levels and distribution of HSPs and the microbiota composition (microbiota fingerprint) of each subject and, thus, guide specific probiotic therapy, tailored to meet the needs of the patient. Microbiota fingerprinting ought to include molecular biology techniques for sequencing highly conserved DNA, e.g., genes encoding 16S RNA, for species identification and, in addition, quantification of each relevant microbe.

AB - In this work, we propose that for further studies of the physiopathology and treatment for inflammatory bowel diseases, an integral view of the conditions, including the triad of microbiota-heat shock proteins (HSPs)-probiotics, ought to be considered. Microbiota is the complex microbial flora that resides in the gut, affecting not only gut functions but also the health status of the whole body. Alteration in the microbiota's composition has been implicated in a variety of pathological conditions (e.g., ulcerative colitis, UC), involving both gut and extra-intestinal tissues and organs. Some of these pathologies are also associated with an altered expression of HSPs (chaperones) and this is the reason why they may be considered chaperonopathies. Probiotics, which are live microorganisms able to restore the correct, healthy equilibrium of microbiota composition, can ameliorate symptoms in patients suffering from UC and modulate expression levels of HSPs. However, currently probiotic therapy follows ex-adiuvantibus criteria, i.e., treatments with beneficial effects but whose mechanism of action is unknown, which should be changed so the probiotics needed in each case are predetermined on the basis of the patient's microbiota. Consequently, efforts are necessary to develop diagnostic tools for elucidating levels and distribution of HSPs and the microbiota composition (microbiota fingerprint) of each subject and, thus, guide specific probiotic therapy, tailored to meet the needs of the patient. Microbiota fingerprinting ought to include molecular biology techniques for sequencing highly conserved DNA, e.g., genes encoding 16S RNA, for species identification and, in addition, quantification of each relevant microbe.

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