Grape and environmental mycoflora monitoring in old, traditionally cultivated vineyards on Mount Etna, southern Italy

Patrizia Bella, Patrizia Bella, Matilde Tessitori, Cinzia Oliveri, Vittoria Catara, Rosa La Rosa

Risultato della ricerca: Article

8 Citazioni (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Grape contamination by several fungal species occurs during a vineyard's preharvest and harvest. Agronomic management and microclimatic conditions can affect fungi occurrence and epidemiology, thus explaining qualitative differences in mycoflora composition, including the presence of phytopathogenic or mycotoxigenic fungi. In this study a two-year grape, air and soil mycoflora monitoring programme was undertaken in vineyards on Mount Etna (eastern Sicily, Italy). The mycoflora composition was investigated at pea berry and veraison phenological phases from air and soil and at ripening from sample grapes. RESULTS: Mycoflora in air and soil varied according to the phenological stage. In the air samples, penicillia were dominant over aspergilli at the pea berry phase, but their ratio was inverted at early veraison. Black aspergilli (BA) were isolated from the vine environment and grape samples, where BA were represented mainly by Aspergillus niger aggregate, which showed no or low ochratoxin A (OTA) production. Aspergillus carbonarius was either not identified or identified at low frequency, although most of the isolates produced OTA. CONCLUSION: Monitoring focused on the environmental mycoflora composition and highlighted the good health profile of various Sicilian autochthonous grape cultivars. In addition, data suggest that the lower relative humidity occurring at the highest altitudes reduces BA incidence. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)65-73
Numero di pagine9
RivistaJournal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
Volume97
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2017

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environmental monitoring
Environmental Monitoring
Vitis
Aspergillus
vineyards
Italy
grapes
Air
air
Soil
Peas
ochratoxin A
small fruits
Fruit
peas
Fungi
Aspergillus carbonarius
Sicily
soil
fungi

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Food Science

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Grape and environmental mycoflora monitoring in old, traditionally cultivated vineyards on Mount Etna, southern Italy. / Bella, Patrizia; Bella, Patrizia; Tessitori, Matilde; Oliveri, Cinzia; Catara, Vittoria; La Rosa, Rosa.

In: Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, Vol. 97, 2017, pag. 65-73.

Risultato della ricerca: Article

Bella, Patrizia ; Bella, Patrizia ; Tessitori, Matilde ; Oliveri, Cinzia ; Catara, Vittoria ; La Rosa, Rosa. / Grape and environmental mycoflora monitoring in old, traditionally cultivated vineyards on Mount Etna, southern Italy. In: Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture. 2017 ; Vol. 97. pagg. 65-73.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Grape contamination by several fungal species occurs during a vineyard's preharvest and harvest. Agronomic management and microclimatic conditions can affect fungi occurrence and epidemiology, thus explaining qualitative differences in mycoflora composition, including the presence of phytopathogenic or mycotoxigenic fungi. In this study a two-year grape, air and soil mycoflora monitoring programme was undertaken in vineyards on Mount Etna (eastern Sicily, Italy). The mycoflora composition was investigated at pea berry and veraison phenological phases from air and soil and at ripening from sample grapes. RESULTS: Mycoflora in air and soil varied according to the phenological stage. In the air samples, penicillia were dominant over aspergilli at the pea berry phase, but their ratio was inverted at early veraison. Black aspergilli (BA) were isolated from the vine environment and grape samples, where BA were represented mainly by Aspergillus niger aggregate, which showed no or low ochratoxin A (OTA) production. Aspergillus carbonarius was either not identified or identified at low frequency, although most of the isolates produced OTA. CONCLUSION: Monitoring focused on the environmental mycoflora composition and highlighted the good health profile of various Sicilian autochthonous grape cultivars. In addition, data suggest that the lower relative humidity occurring at the highest altitudes reduces BA incidence. {\^A}{\circledC} 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.",
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AU - Bella, Patrizia

AU - Bella, Patrizia

AU - Tessitori, Matilde

AU - Oliveri, Cinzia

AU - Catara, Vittoria

AU - La Rosa, Rosa

PY - 2017

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Grape contamination by several fungal species occurs during a vineyard's preharvest and harvest. Agronomic management and microclimatic conditions can affect fungi occurrence and epidemiology, thus explaining qualitative differences in mycoflora composition, including the presence of phytopathogenic or mycotoxigenic fungi. In this study a two-year grape, air and soil mycoflora monitoring programme was undertaken in vineyards on Mount Etna (eastern Sicily, Italy). The mycoflora composition was investigated at pea berry and veraison phenological phases from air and soil and at ripening from sample grapes. RESULTS: Mycoflora in air and soil varied according to the phenological stage. In the air samples, penicillia were dominant over aspergilli at the pea berry phase, but their ratio was inverted at early veraison. Black aspergilli (BA) were isolated from the vine environment and grape samples, where BA were represented mainly by Aspergillus niger aggregate, which showed no or low ochratoxin A (OTA) production. Aspergillus carbonarius was either not identified or identified at low frequency, although most of the isolates produced OTA. CONCLUSION: Monitoring focused on the environmental mycoflora composition and highlighted the good health profile of various Sicilian autochthonous grape cultivars. In addition, data suggest that the lower relative humidity occurring at the highest altitudes reduces BA incidence. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

AB - BACKGROUND: Grape contamination by several fungal species occurs during a vineyard's preharvest and harvest. Agronomic management and microclimatic conditions can affect fungi occurrence and epidemiology, thus explaining qualitative differences in mycoflora composition, including the presence of phytopathogenic or mycotoxigenic fungi. In this study a two-year grape, air and soil mycoflora monitoring programme was undertaken in vineyards on Mount Etna (eastern Sicily, Italy). The mycoflora composition was investigated at pea berry and veraison phenological phases from air and soil and at ripening from sample grapes. RESULTS: Mycoflora in air and soil varied according to the phenological stage. In the air samples, penicillia were dominant over aspergilli at the pea berry phase, but their ratio was inverted at early veraison. Black aspergilli (BA) were isolated from the vine environment and grape samples, where BA were represented mainly by Aspergillus niger aggregate, which showed no or low ochratoxin A (OTA) production. Aspergillus carbonarius was either not identified or identified at low frequency, although most of the isolates produced OTA. CONCLUSION: Monitoring focused on the environmental mycoflora composition and highlighted the good health profile of various Sicilian autochthonous grape cultivars. In addition, data suggest that the lower relative humidity occurring at the highest altitudes reduces BA incidence. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

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