Fungi and Bacteria in Indoor Cultural Heritage Environments: Microbial-related Risks for Artworks and Human Health

Franco Palla, Salvatore Barbaro, Rosa Maria Chisesi, Enza Di Carlo, Giovanni Travagliato, Giovanna Lombardo, Giovanna Benedetta Barresi, Mauro Sebastianelli, Valentina Rotolo

Risultato della ricerca: Article

Abstract

Cultural heritage constitutive materials can provide excellent substrates for microbial colonization, highly influenced by thermo-hygrometric parameters. In cultural heritage-related environments, a detrimental microbial load may be present both on manufacts surface and in the aerosol. In this study, bacterial and fungal colonisation has been investigated in three Sicilian confined environments (archive, cave and hypogea), each with peculiar structures and different thermo-hygrometric parameters. Particular attention has been paid to microorganisms able to induce artifacts biodeterioration and to release biological particles in the aerosol (spores, cellular debrides, toxins and allergens) potentially dangerous for the human health (visitors/users). Results provided information on the composition of the biological consortia, highlighting also the symbiotic relationships between micro (cyanobacteria, bacteria and fungi) and macro-organisms (plants, bryophyte and insects). The results of this integrated approach, including molecular biology techniques, are essential for a complete understanding of both microbial colonization of the cultural objects and the potential relationship with illness to human.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)257-264
Numero di pagine8
RivistaDefault journal
Volume4
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2016

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cultural heritage
colonization
fungus
bacterium
aerosol
bryophyte
integrated approach
toxin
cave
artifact
spore
cyanobacterium
biodegradation
microorganism
insect
substrate
human health
parameter

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Fungi and Bacteria in Indoor Cultural Heritage Environments: Microbial-related Risks for Artworks and Human Health. / Palla, Franco; Barbaro, Salvatore; Chisesi, Rosa Maria; Di Carlo, Enza; Travagliato, Giovanni; Lombardo, Giovanna; Barresi, Giovanna Benedetta; Sebastianelli, Mauro; Rotolo, Valentina.

In: Default journal, Vol. 4, 2016, pag. 257-264.

Risultato della ricerca: Article

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AU - Palla, Franco

AU - Barbaro, Salvatore

AU - Chisesi, Rosa Maria

AU - Di Carlo, Enza

AU - Travagliato, Giovanni

AU - Lombardo, Giovanna

AU - Barresi, Giovanna Benedetta

AU - Sebastianelli, Mauro

AU - Rotolo, Valentina

PY - 2016

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N2 - Cultural heritage constitutive materials can provide excellent substrates for microbial colonization, highly influenced by thermo-hygrometric parameters. In cultural heritage-related environments, a detrimental microbial load may be present both on manufacts surface and in the aerosol. In this study, bacterial and fungal colonisation has been investigated in three Sicilian confined environments (archive, cave and hypogea), each with peculiar structures and different thermo-hygrometric parameters. Particular attention has been paid to microorganisms able to induce artifacts biodeterioration and to release biological particles in the aerosol (spores, cellular debrides, toxins and allergens) potentially dangerous for the human health (visitors/users). Results provided information on the composition of the biological consortia, highlighting also the symbiotic relationships between micro (cyanobacteria, bacteria and fungi) and macro-organisms (plants, bryophyte and insects). The results of this integrated approach, including molecular biology techniques, are essential for a complete understanding of both microbial colonization of the cultural objects and the potential relationship with illness to human.

AB - Cultural heritage constitutive materials can provide excellent substrates for microbial colonization, highly influenced by thermo-hygrometric parameters. In cultural heritage-related environments, a detrimental microbial load may be present both on manufacts surface and in the aerosol. In this study, bacterial and fungal colonisation has been investigated in three Sicilian confined environments (archive, cave and hypogea), each with peculiar structures and different thermo-hygrometric parameters. Particular attention has been paid to microorganisms able to induce artifacts biodeterioration and to release biological particles in the aerosol (spores, cellular debrides, toxins and allergens) potentially dangerous for the human health (visitors/users). Results provided information on the composition of the biological consortia, highlighting also the symbiotic relationships between micro (cyanobacteria, bacteria and fungi) and macro-organisms (plants, bryophyte and insects). The results of this integrated approach, including molecular biology techniques, are essential for a complete understanding of both microbial colonization of the cultural objects and the potential relationship with illness to human.

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