From Spain to Sicily after the Expulsion: Conversos between Economic Networks and the Aristocratic Elite

Risultato della ricerca: Article

Abstract

This article focuses on a group of conversos families from Spain, who established themselves in Palermo after the Expulsion of the Jews in 1492. There they supported financial activities of the Nazione Catalana and established strong relationships with the local aristocracy. Thanks to this alliance, they managed to avoid persecution by the Spanish Inquisition, “cleanse” their “impure” blood and reach high positions within politics and society: feudal titles, political and financial offices, habits of military orders, ecclesiastical appointments and sometimes even sainthood. Firstly, the paper will give a brief sketch of the phenomenon of conversos in Sicily as well as the activities of the Spanish Inquisition before and after the expulsion of 1492. A significant case study will then be presented, focusing on the Torongi family (New Christians from Majorca settled in Palermo) and its network of relationships in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)421-445
Numero di pagine25
RivistaJournal of Early Modern History
Volume22
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2018

Cita questo

@article{91d3bfa00fc04157bbb024e5c1fb2ffd,
title = "From Spain to Sicily after the Expulsion: Conversos between Economic Networks and the Aristocratic Elite",
abstract = "This article focuses on a group of conversos families from Spain, who established themselves in Palermo after the Expulsion of the Jews in 1492. There they supported financial activities of the Nazione Catalana and established strong relationships with the local aristocracy. Thanks to this alliance, they managed to avoid persecution by the Spanish Inquisition, “cleanse” their “impure” blood and reach high positions within politics and society: feudal titles, political and financial offices, habits of military orders, ecclesiastical appointments and sometimes even sainthood. Firstly, the paper will give a brief sketch of the phenomenon of conversos in Sicily as well as the activities of the Spanish Inquisition before and after the expulsion of 1492. A significant case study will then be presented, focusing on the Torongi family (New Christians from Majorca settled in Palermo) and its network of relationships in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.",
author = "Fabrizio D'Avenia",
year = "2018",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "421--445",
journal = "Journal of Early Modern History",
issn = "1385-3783",
publisher = "Brill",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - From Spain to Sicily after the Expulsion: Conversos between Economic Networks and the Aristocratic Elite

AU - D'Avenia, Fabrizio

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - This article focuses on a group of conversos families from Spain, who established themselves in Palermo after the Expulsion of the Jews in 1492. There they supported financial activities of the Nazione Catalana and established strong relationships with the local aristocracy. Thanks to this alliance, they managed to avoid persecution by the Spanish Inquisition, “cleanse” their “impure” blood and reach high positions within politics and society: feudal titles, political and financial offices, habits of military orders, ecclesiastical appointments and sometimes even sainthood. Firstly, the paper will give a brief sketch of the phenomenon of conversos in Sicily as well as the activities of the Spanish Inquisition before and after the expulsion of 1492. A significant case study will then be presented, focusing on the Torongi family (New Christians from Majorca settled in Palermo) and its network of relationships in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

AB - This article focuses on a group of conversos families from Spain, who established themselves in Palermo after the Expulsion of the Jews in 1492. There they supported financial activities of the Nazione Catalana and established strong relationships with the local aristocracy. Thanks to this alliance, they managed to avoid persecution by the Spanish Inquisition, “cleanse” their “impure” blood and reach high positions within politics and society: feudal titles, political and financial offices, habits of military orders, ecclesiastical appointments and sometimes even sainthood. Firstly, the paper will give a brief sketch of the phenomenon of conversos in Sicily as well as the activities of the Spanish Inquisition before and after the expulsion of 1492. A significant case study will then be presented, focusing on the Torongi family (New Christians from Majorca settled in Palermo) and its network of relationships in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/348060

UR - https://brill.com/view/journals/jemh/22/6/article-p421_1.xml#d726885e136

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 421

EP - 445

JO - Journal of Early Modern History

JF - Journal of Early Modern History

SN - 1385-3783

ER -