Evaluating the role of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex on recognition memory with rTMS: evidence from healthy subjects and neurological patients

Risultato della ricerca: Other

Abstract

Converging evidence from functional imaging and lesion studies suggested that a distributed neural network comprising the hippocampal formation, medial and lateral parietal regions as well as the prefrontal cortex is involved in episodic memory. Some findings suggested that successful memory formation requires the coordinated modulation of neural activity among these different cortical areas. It appears particularly important to understand the functional interactions between these regions during memory processes. My talk will be focused on the prefrontal contribution to verbal and non-verbal recognition memory and to familiarity and recollection processes. New evidence will be provided and discussed from repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) application over dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), suggesting that this region has a degree of functional specialisation and plays an important role in the encoding of verbal and non-verbal memoranda. We will also report an enhancement of recognition memory performance with rTMS at retrieval. We will discuss possible account of these findings within a broader framework of the inhibitory nature of functional interactions between the DLPFC and the medial temporal lobe during memory processes.
Lingua originaleEnglish
Numero di pagine1
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2010

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Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Prefrontal Cortex
Healthy Volunteers
Parietal Lobe
Episodic Memory
Temporal Lobe
Hippocampus
Recognition (Psychology)

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title = "Evaluating the role of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex on recognition memory with rTMS: evidence from healthy subjects and neurological patients",
abstract = "Converging evidence from functional imaging and lesion studies suggested that a distributed neural network comprising the hippocampal formation, medial and lateral parietal regions as well as the prefrontal cortex is involved in episodic memory. Some findings suggested that successful memory formation requires the coordinated modulation of neural activity among these different cortical areas. It appears particularly important to understand the functional interactions between these regions during memory processes. My talk will be focused on the prefrontal contribution to verbal and non-verbal recognition memory and to familiarity and recollection processes. New evidence will be provided and discussed from repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) application over dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), suggesting that this region has a degree of functional specialisation and plays an important role in the encoding of verbal and non-verbal memoranda. We will also report an enhancement of recognition memory performance with rTMS at retrieval. We will discuss possible account of these findings within a broader framework of the inhibitory nature of functional interactions between the DLPFC and the medial temporal lobe during memory processes.",
author = "Lisa Cipolotti and Massimiliano Oliveri and Daniela Smirni and Mangano, {Giuseppa Renata} and Patrizia Turriziani",
year = "2010",
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T1 - Evaluating the role of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex on recognition memory with rTMS: evidence from healthy subjects and neurological patients

AU - Cipolotti, Lisa

AU - Oliveri, Massimiliano

AU - Smirni, Daniela

AU - Mangano, Giuseppa Renata

AU - Turriziani, Patrizia

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Converging evidence from functional imaging and lesion studies suggested that a distributed neural network comprising the hippocampal formation, medial and lateral parietal regions as well as the prefrontal cortex is involved in episodic memory. Some findings suggested that successful memory formation requires the coordinated modulation of neural activity among these different cortical areas. It appears particularly important to understand the functional interactions between these regions during memory processes. My talk will be focused on the prefrontal contribution to verbal and non-verbal recognition memory and to familiarity and recollection processes. New evidence will be provided and discussed from repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) application over dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), suggesting that this region has a degree of functional specialisation and plays an important role in the encoding of verbal and non-verbal memoranda. We will also report an enhancement of recognition memory performance with rTMS at retrieval. We will discuss possible account of these findings within a broader framework of the inhibitory nature of functional interactions between the DLPFC and the medial temporal lobe during memory processes.

AB - Converging evidence from functional imaging and lesion studies suggested that a distributed neural network comprising the hippocampal formation, medial and lateral parietal regions as well as the prefrontal cortex is involved in episodic memory. Some findings suggested that successful memory formation requires the coordinated modulation of neural activity among these different cortical areas. It appears particularly important to understand the functional interactions between these regions during memory processes. My talk will be focused on the prefrontal contribution to verbal and non-verbal recognition memory and to familiarity and recollection processes. New evidence will be provided and discussed from repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) application over dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), suggesting that this region has a degree of functional specialisation and plays an important role in the encoding of verbal and non-verbal memoranda. We will also report an enhancement of recognition memory performance with rTMS at retrieval. We will discuss possible account of these findings within a broader framework of the inhibitory nature of functional interactions between the DLPFC and the medial temporal lobe during memory processes.

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/51788

M3 - Other

ER -