Effects of partial rootzone drying and rootstock vigour on dry matter partitioning of apple trees (Malus domestica cvar Pink lady).

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Abstract

The effects of partial rootzone drying (PRD) and rootstock vigour on dry matter accumulation and partitioningamong leaves, shoots, fruits, frame and roots of apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh. cvar Pink Lady) wereinvestigated in 2005 near Caltavuturo, in Sicily. In a first field trial, trees on MM.106 rootstock were subjectedto: conventional irrigation (CI), maintaining soil moisture above 0·80 of field capacity; PRD irrigation, wherealternating sides of the rootzone received 0·50 of the CI irrigation water; and continuous deficit irrigation (DI),where 0·50 of the CI water was equally applied to both sides of the rootzone. In a second trial, trees on M.9or MM.106 were subjected to CI and PRD irrigation. In trial 1, dry matter accumulation was markedly reducedby DI irrigation and to a lesser extent by PRD; PRD trees partitioned 20% less to leaves, 31% less to fruits and 24%more to woody components than CI trees; DI trees partitioned 14% less to current shoots and 18% more to fruitsthan CI and had the highest fruit:leaf ratio. In trial 2, there was no interaction between rootstock and irrigationtreatments. MM.106 induced greater leaf, shoot, frame and root dry weights (DWs) than M.9, resulting in morevegetative growth and larger trees. PRD reduced leaf, shoot, frame and fruit DWs, while root DWs were similar toCI, and thus PRD trees were 18% smaller than CI trees. Neither rootstock nor irrigation affected dry matterpartitioning among organs or root:canopy ratio, whereas PRD trees or trees on MM.106 showed better wateruse efficiency than CI and M.9, respectively. The results show that PRD trees did not activate drought tolerancestrategies in terms of dry matter allocation that could improve acquisition of water resources, regardless ofrootstock. PRD irrigation increased above-ground dry matter partitioning towards woody components at the expense of leaves and fruits.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)75-86
Numero di pagine12
RivistaJOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
Volume150
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2012

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root zone drying
Malus
Malus domestica
dry matter partitioning
rootstocks
vigor
apples
irrigation
Fruit
deficit irrigation
fruits
leaves
shoots
Weights and Measures
dry matter accumulation
irrigation water
Sicily
Water Resources
Water
Droughts

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Genetics

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@article{c119652bb9214f1ebcd78dcbe78083f9,
title = "Effects of partial rootzone drying and rootstock vigour on dry matter partitioning of apple trees (Malus domestica cvar Pink lady).",
abstract = "The effects of partial rootzone drying (PRD) and rootstock vigour on dry matter accumulation and partitioningamong leaves, shoots, fruits, frame and roots of apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh. cvar Pink Lady) wereinvestigated in 2005 near Caltavuturo, in Sicily. In a first field trial, trees on MM.106 rootstock were subjectedto: conventional irrigation (CI), maintaining soil moisture above 0·80 of field capacity; PRD irrigation, wherealternating sides of the rootzone received 0·50 of the CI irrigation water; and continuous deficit irrigation (DI),where 0·50 of the CI water was equally applied to both sides of the rootzone. In a second trial, trees on M.9or MM.106 were subjected to CI and PRD irrigation. In trial 1, dry matter accumulation was markedly reducedby DI irrigation and to a lesser extent by PRD; PRD trees partitioned 20{\%} less to leaves, 31{\%} less to fruits and 24{\%}more to woody components than CI trees; DI trees partitioned 14{\%} less to current shoots and 18{\%} more to fruitsthan CI and had the highest fruit:leaf ratio. In trial 2, there was no interaction between rootstock and irrigationtreatments. MM.106 induced greater leaf, shoot, frame and root dry weights (DWs) than M.9, resulting in morevegetative growth and larger trees. PRD reduced leaf, shoot, frame and fruit DWs, while root DWs were similar toCI, and thus PRD trees were 18{\%} smaller than CI trees. Neither rootstock nor irrigation affected dry matterpartitioning among organs or root:canopy ratio, whereas PRD trees or trees on MM.106 showed better wateruse efficiency than CI and M.9, respectively. The results show that PRD trees did not activate drought tolerancestrategies in terms of dry matter allocation that could improve acquisition of water resources, regardless ofrootstock. PRD irrigation increased above-ground dry matter partitioning towards woody components at the expense of leaves and fruits.",
author = "{Lo Bianco}, Riccardo and Vittorio Farina",
year = "2012",
language = "English",
volume = "150",
pages = "75--86",
journal = "JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE",
issn = "0021-8596",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of partial rootzone drying and rootstock vigour on dry matter partitioning of apple trees (Malus domestica cvar Pink lady).

AU - Lo Bianco, Riccardo

AU - Farina, Vittorio

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - The effects of partial rootzone drying (PRD) and rootstock vigour on dry matter accumulation and partitioningamong leaves, shoots, fruits, frame and roots of apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh. cvar Pink Lady) wereinvestigated in 2005 near Caltavuturo, in Sicily. In a first field trial, trees on MM.106 rootstock were subjectedto: conventional irrigation (CI), maintaining soil moisture above 0·80 of field capacity; PRD irrigation, wherealternating sides of the rootzone received 0·50 of the CI irrigation water; and continuous deficit irrigation (DI),where 0·50 of the CI water was equally applied to both sides of the rootzone. In a second trial, trees on M.9or MM.106 were subjected to CI and PRD irrigation. In trial 1, dry matter accumulation was markedly reducedby DI irrigation and to a lesser extent by PRD; PRD trees partitioned 20% less to leaves, 31% less to fruits and 24%more to woody components than CI trees; DI trees partitioned 14% less to current shoots and 18% more to fruitsthan CI and had the highest fruit:leaf ratio. In trial 2, there was no interaction between rootstock and irrigationtreatments. MM.106 induced greater leaf, shoot, frame and root dry weights (DWs) than M.9, resulting in morevegetative growth and larger trees. PRD reduced leaf, shoot, frame and fruit DWs, while root DWs were similar toCI, and thus PRD trees were 18% smaller than CI trees. Neither rootstock nor irrigation affected dry matterpartitioning among organs or root:canopy ratio, whereas PRD trees or trees on MM.106 showed better wateruse efficiency than CI and M.9, respectively. The results show that PRD trees did not activate drought tolerancestrategies in terms of dry matter allocation that could improve acquisition of water resources, regardless ofrootstock. PRD irrigation increased above-ground dry matter partitioning towards woody components at the expense of leaves and fruits.

AB - The effects of partial rootzone drying (PRD) and rootstock vigour on dry matter accumulation and partitioningamong leaves, shoots, fruits, frame and roots of apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh. cvar Pink Lady) wereinvestigated in 2005 near Caltavuturo, in Sicily. In a first field trial, trees on MM.106 rootstock were subjectedto: conventional irrigation (CI), maintaining soil moisture above 0·80 of field capacity; PRD irrigation, wherealternating sides of the rootzone received 0·50 of the CI irrigation water; and continuous deficit irrigation (DI),where 0·50 of the CI water was equally applied to both sides of the rootzone. In a second trial, trees on M.9or MM.106 were subjected to CI and PRD irrigation. In trial 1, dry matter accumulation was markedly reducedby DI irrigation and to a lesser extent by PRD; PRD trees partitioned 20% less to leaves, 31% less to fruits and 24%more to woody components than CI trees; DI trees partitioned 14% less to current shoots and 18% more to fruitsthan CI and had the highest fruit:leaf ratio. In trial 2, there was no interaction between rootstock and irrigationtreatments. MM.106 induced greater leaf, shoot, frame and root dry weights (DWs) than M.9, resulting in morevegetative growth and larger trees. PRD reduced leaf, shoot, frame and fruit DWs, while root DWs were similar toCI, and thus PRD trees were 18% smaller than CI trees. Neither rootstock nor irrigation affected dry matterpartitioning among organs or root:canopy ratio, whereas PRD trees or trees on MM.106 showed better wateruse efficiency than CI and M.9, respectively. The results show that PRD trees did not activate drought tolerancestrategies in terms of dry matter allocation that could improve acquisition of water resources, regardless ofrootstock. PRD irrigation increased above-ground dry matter partitioning towards woody components at the expense of leaves and fruits.

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/59321

M3 - Article

VL - 150

SP - 75

EP - 86

JO - JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE

JF - JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE

SN - 0021-8596

ER -