Do personality traits and self-regulatory processes affect decision-making tendencies?

Silvana Miceli, Maria Sinatra, Lucia Monacis, Valeria De Palo, Santo Di Nuovo

Risultato della ricerca: Article

Abstract

Objective: This research attempted to clarify the role played by personality traits and self-regulated motivation in affecting decision-making tendencies. Method: Study 1 (n = 209) examined whether the Big Five personality traits predict minimising, maximising, and satisficing tendencies; Study 2 (n = 460) tested the mediating role of self-regulatory orientations in the relationship between personality traits and decision-making tendencies by performing structural equation modelling with latent variables. Results: Conscientiousness emerged as the strongest positive predictor of maximising, whereas openness to experience, conscientiousness, and agreeableness emerged as negative predictors of satisficing. As for the mediational model, both locomotion and assessment played a role in mediating the relationships between the personality traits and decision-making tendencies. Conclusions: This research provided interesting insights into the underlying motivations and strategies that lead individuals to maximise, satisfice, or minimise.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)-
Numero di pagine10
RivistaAustralian Journal of Psychology
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2018

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Personality
Decision Making
Motivation
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

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Do personality traits and self-regulatory processes affect decision-making tendencies? / Miceli, Silvana; Sinatra, Maria; Monacis, Lucia; De Palo, Valeria; Di Nuovo, Santo.

In: Australian Journal of Psychology, 2018, pag. -.

Risultato della ricerca: Article

Miceli, Silvana ; Sinatra, Maria ; Monacis, Lucia ; De Palo, Valeria ; Di Nuovo, Santo. / Do personality traits and self-regulatory processes affect decision-making tendencies?. In: Australian Journal of Psychology. 2018 ; pagg. -.
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AB - Objective: This research attempted to clarify the role played by personality traits and self-regulated motivation in affecting decision-making tendencies. Method: Study 1 (n = 209) examined whether the Big Five personality traits predict minimising, maximising, and satisficing tendencies; Study 2 (n = 460) tested the mediating role of self-regulatory orientations in the relationship between personality traits and decision-making tendencies by performing structural equation modelling with latent variables. Results: Conscientiousness emerged as the strongest positive predictor of maximising, whereas openness to experience, conscientiousness, and agreeableness emerged as negative predictors of satisficing. As for the mediational model, both locomotion and assessment played a role in mediating the relationships between the personality traits and decision-making tendencies. Conclusions: This research provided interesting insights into the underlying motivations and strategies that lead individuals to maximise, satisfice, or minimise.

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