Competing factor structures of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and its measurement invariance across clinical and non-clinical samples

Salerno, L

Risultato della ricerca: Article

6 Citazioni (Scopus)

Abstract

Although several studies have investigated the factor structure of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), there are still disagreements about it. The present study assessed: a) the goodness of fit of nine competing factor models for the RSES using data from a clinical sample of 855 women with eating/weight disorders; and b) its measurement invariance across clinical and non-clinical (n = 943) samples. A bifactor model, with a general self-esteem factor, plus positive and negative method factors, provided a better fit with the data than alternative models. However, the results showed the high reliability of the general self-esteem factor, and a low reliability of the two method factors. Furthermore, the full metric invariance of the RSES, as well as a partial scalar invariance and partial strict invariance across clinical and non-clinical groups, was supported by our findings. The factor variances and means differed significantly across groups. Overall, the findings of this study showed that the factor structure of the RSES is contaminated by method effects due to item wording, also with clinical samples, and that respondents from clinical and non-clinical groups interpret the self-esteem construct of the RSES items in a substantially similar way.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)13-19
Numero di pagine7
RivistaPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume113
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Self Concept
Weights and Measures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

Cita questo

@article{0da960428c214069ae9cb006b91ad8cd,
title = "Competing factor structures of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and its measurement invariance across clinical and non-clinical samples",
abstract = "Although several studies have investigated the factor structure of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), there are still disagreements about it. The present study assessed: a) the goodness of fit of nine competing factor models for the RSES using data from a clinical sample of 855 women with eating/weight disorders; and b) its measurement invariance across clinical and non-clinical (n = 943) samples. A bifactor model, with a general self-esteem factor, plus positive and negative method factors, provided a better fit with the data than alternative models. However, the results showed the high reliability of the general self-esteem factor, and a low reliability of the two method factors. Furthermore, the full metric invariance of the RSES, as well as a partial scalar invariance and partial strict invariance across clinical and non-clinical groups, was supported by our findings. The factor variances and means differed significantly across groups. Overall, the findings of this study showed that the factor structure of the RSES is contaminated by method effects due to item wording, also with clinical samples, and that respondents from clinical and non-clinical groups interpret the self-esteem construct of the RSES items in a substantially similar way.",
author = "{Salerno, L} and Sonia Ingoglia and {Lo Coco}, Gianluca",
year = "2017",
language = "English",
volume = "113",
pages = "13--19",
journal = "Personality and Individual Differences",
issn = "0191-8869",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Competing factor structures of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and its measurement invariance across clinical and non-clinical samples

AU - Salerno, L

AU - Ingoglia, Sonia

AU - Lo Coco, Gianluca

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Although several studies have investigated the factor structure of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), there are still disagreements about it. The present study assessed: a) the goodness of fit of nine competing factor models for the RSES using data from a clinical sample of 855 women with eating/weight disorders; and b) its measurement invariance across clinical and non-clinical (n = 943) samples. A bifactor model, with a general self-esteem factor, plus positive and negative method factors, provided a better fit with the data than alternative models. However, the results showed the high reliability of the general self-esteem factor, and a low reliability of the two method factors. Furthermore, the full metric invariance of the RSES, as well as a partial scalar invariance and partial strict invariance across clinical and non-clinical groups, was supported by our findings. The factor variances and means differed significantly across groups. Overall, the findings of this study showed that the factor structure of the RSES is contaminated by method effects due to item wording, also with clinical samples, and that respondents from clinical and non-clinical groups interpret the self-esteem construct of the RSES items in a substantially similar way.

AB - Although several studies have investigated the factor structure of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), there are still disagreements about it. The present study assessed: a) the goodness of fit of nine competing factor models for the RSES using data from a clinical sample of 855 women with eating/weight disorders; and b) its measurement invariance across clinical and non-clinical (n = 943) samples. A bifactor model, with a general self-esteem factor, plus positive and negative method factors, provided a better fit with the data than alternative models. However, the results showed the high reliability of the general self-esteem factor, and a low reliability of the two method factors. Furthermore, the full metric invariance of the RSES, as well as a partial scalar invariance and partial strict invariance across clinical and non-clinical groups, was supported by our findings. The factor variances and means differed significantly across groups. Overall, the findings of this study showed that the factor structure of the RSES is contaminated by method effects due to item wording, also with clinical samples, and that respondents from clinical and non-clinical groups interpret the self-esteem construct of the RSES items in a substantially similar way.

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/225655

UR - http://www.elsevier.com/locate/paid

M3 - Article

VL - 113

SP - 13

EP - 19

JO - Personality and Individual Differences

JF - Personality and Individual Differences

SN - 0191-8869

ER -