Community water fluoridation and caries prevention: a critical review

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Abstract

The aim of this paper was to critically review the current role of community water fluoridation in preventing dental caries. Original articles and reviews published in English language from January 2001 to June 2006 were selected through MEDLINE database. Other sources were taken from the references of the selected papers. For the past 50 years community water fluoridation has been considered the milestone of caries prevention and as one of the major public health measures of the 20th century. However, it is now accepted that the primary cariostatic action of fluoride occurs after tooth eruption. Moreover, the caries reduction directly attributable to water fluoridation have declined in the last decades as the use of topical fluoride had become more widespread, whereas enamel fluorosis has been reported as an emerging problem in fluoridated areas. Several studies conducted in fluoridated and nonfluoridated communities suggested that this method of delivering fluoride may be unnecessary for caries prevention, particularly in the industrialized countries where the caries level has became low. Although water fluoridation may still be a relevant public health measure in poor and disadvantaged populations, the use of topical fluoride offers an optimal opportunity to prevent caries among people living in both industrialized and developing countries.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)189-193
RivistaClinical Oral Investigations
Volume11
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2007

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Fluoridation
Topical Fluorides
Fluorides
Developed Countries
Public Health
Tooth Eruption
Dental Caries
Vulnerable Populations
Dental Enamel
MEDLINE
Developing Countries
Language
Databases
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

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title = "Community water fluoridation and caries prevention: a critical review",
abstract = "The aim of this paper was to critically review the current role of community water fluoridation in preventing dental caries. Original articles and reviews published in English language from January 2001 to June 2006 were selected through MEDLINE database. Other sources were taken from the references of the selected papers. For the past 50 years community water fluoridation has been considered the milestone of caries prevention and as one of the major public health measures of the 20th century. However, it is now accepted that the primary cariostatic action of fluoride occurs after tooth eruption. Moreover, the caries reduction directly attributable to water fluoridation have declined in the last decades as the use of topical fluoride had become more widespread, whereas enamel fluorosis has been reported as an emerging problem in fluoridated areas. Several studies conducted in fluoridated and nonfluoridated communities suggested that this method of delivering fluoride may be unnecessary for caries prevention, particularly in the industrialized countries where the caries level has became low. Although water fluoridation may still be a relevant public health measure in poor and disadvantaged populations, the use of topical fluoride offers an optimal opportunity to prevent caries among people living in both industrialized and developing countries.",
keywords = "DENTAL CARIES; ENAMEL FLUOROSIS; PREVALENCE; CHILDREN; HEALTH",
author = "Giovanna Giuliana and Giuseppe Pizzo and Ignazio Pizzo and Piscopo, {Maria Ruth}",
year = "2007",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "189--193",
journal = "Clinical Oral Investigations",
issn = "1432-6981",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Community water fluoridation and caries prevention: a critical review

AU - Giuliana, Giovanna

AU - Pizzo, Giuseppe

AU - Pizzo, Ignazio

AU - Piscopo, Maria Ruth

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - The aim of this paper was to critically review the current role of community water fluoridation in preventing dental caries. Original articles and reviews published in English language from January 2001 to June 2006 were selected through MEDLINE database. Other sources were taken from the references of the selected papers. For the past 50 years community water fluoridation has been considered the milestone of caries prevention and as one of the major public health measures of the 20th century. However, it is now accepted that the primary cariostatic action of fluoride occurs after tooth eruption. Moreover, the caries reduction directly attributable to water fluoridation have declined in the last decades as the use of topical fluoride had become more widespread, whereas enamel fluorosis has been reported as an emerging problem in fluoridated areas. Several studies conducted in fluoridated and nonfluoridated communities suggested that this method of delivering fluoride may be unnecessary for caries prevention, particularly in the industrialized countries where the caries level has became low. Although water fluoridation may still be a relevant public health measure in poor and disadvantaged populations, the use of topical fluoride offers an optimal opportunity to prevent caries among people living in both industrialized and developing countries.

AB - The aim of this paper was to critically review the current role of community water fluoridation in preventing dental caries. Original articles and reviews published in English language from January 2001 to June 2006 were selected through MEDLINE database. Other sources were taken from the references of the selected papers. For the past 50 years community water fluoridation has been considered the milestone of caries prevention and as one of the major public health measures of the 20th century. However, it is now accepted that the primary cariostatic action of fluoride occurs after tooth eruption. Moreover, the caries reduction directly attributable to water fluoridation have declined in the last decades as the use of topical fluoride had become more widespread, whereas enamel fluorosis has been reported as an emerging problem in fluoridated areas. Several studies conducted in fluoridated and nonfluoridated communities suggested that this method of delivering fluoride may be unnecessary for caries prevention, particularly in the industrialized countries where the caries level has became low. Although water fluoridation may still be a relevant public health measure in poor and disadvantaged populations, the use of topical fluoride offers an optimal opportunity to prevent caries among people living in both industrialized and developing countries.

KW - DENTAL CARIES; ENAMEL FLUOROSIS; PREVALENCE; CHILDREN; HEALTH

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/30386

M3 - Article

VL - 11

SP - 189

EP - 193

JO - Clinical Oral Investigations

JF - Clinical Oral Investigations

SN - 1432-6981

ER -