Bloodstream infections in intensive care unit patients: distribution and antibiotic resistance of bacteria

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Abstract

Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are among the leading infections in critically ill patients. The case-fatality rate associated with BSIs in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) reaches 35%-50%. The emergence and diffusion of bacteria with resistance to antibiotics is a global health problem. Multidrug-resistant bacteria were detected in 50.7% of patients with BSIs in a recently published international observational study, with methicillin resistance detected in 48% of Staphylococcus aureus strains, carbapenem resistance detected in 69% of Acinetobacter spp., in 38% of Klebsiella pneumoniae, and in 37% of Pseudomonas spp. Prior hospitalization and antibiotic exposure have been identified as risk factors for infections caused by resistant bacteria in different studies. Patients with BSIs caused by resistant strains showed an increased risk of mortality, which may be explained by a higher incidence of inappropriate empirical therapy in different studies. The molecular genetic characterization of resistant bacteria allows the understanding of the most common mechanisms underlying their resistance and the adoption of surveillance measures. Knowledge of epidemiology, risk factors, mechanisms of resistance, and outcomes of BSIs caused by resistant bacteria may have a major influence on global management of ICU patients. The aim of this review is to provide the clinician an update on BSIs caused by resistant bacteria in ICU patients.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)287-296
Numero di pagine10
RivistaInfection and Drug Resistance
Volume8
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2015

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Microbial Drug Resistance
Intensive Care Units
Bacteria
Infection
Methicillin Resistance
Acinetobacter
Carbapenems
Mortality
Klebsiella pneumoniae
Pseudomonas
Critical Illness
Observational Studies
Staphylococcus aureus
Molecular Biology
Epidemiology
Hospitalization
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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title = "Bloodstream infections in intensive care unit patients: distribution and antibiotic resistance of bacteria",
abstract = "Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are among the leading infections in critically ill patients. The case-fatality rate associated with BSIs in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) reaches 35{\%}-50{\%}. The emergence and diffusion of bacteria with resistance to antibiotics is a global health problem. Multidrug-resistant bacteria were detected in 50.7{\%} of patients with BSIs in a recently published international observational study, with methicillin resistance detected in 48{\%} of Staphylococcus aureus strains, carbapenem resistance detected in 69{\%} of Acinetobacter spp., in 38{\%} of Klebsiella pneumoniae, and in 37{\%} of Pseudomonas spp. Prior hospitalization and antibiotic exposure have been identified as risk factors for infections caused by resistant bacteria in different studies. Patients with BSIs caused by resistant strains showed an increased risk of mortality, which may be explained by a higher incidence of inappropriate empirical therapy in different studies. The molecular genetic characterization of resistant bacteria allows the understanding of the most common mechanisms underlying their resistance and the adoption of surveillance measures. Knowledge of epidemiology, risk factors, mechanisms of resistance, and outcomes of BSIs caused by resistant bacteria may have a major influence on global management of ICU patients. The aim of this review is to provide the clinician an update on BSIs caused by resistant bacteria in ICU patients.",
author = "Laura Saporito and Caterina Mammina and Antonino Giarratano and Raineri, {Santi Maurizio} and Andrea Cortegiani and Giorgio Graziano and Vincenzo Russotto",
year = "2015",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "287--296",
journal = "Infection and Drug Resistance",
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T1 - Bloodstream infections in intensive care unit patients: distribution and antibiotic resistance of bacteria

AU - Saporito, Laura

AU - Mammina, Caterina

AU - Giarratano, Antonino

AU - Raineri, Santi Maurizio

AU - Cortegiani, Andrea

AU - Graziano, Giorgio

AU - Russotto, Vincenzo

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are among the leading infections in critically ill patients. The case-fatality rate associated with BSIs in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) reaches 35%-50%. The emergence and diffusion of bacteria with resistance to antibiotics is a global health problem. Multidrug-resistant bacteria were detected in 50.7% of patients with BSIs in a recently published international observational study, with methicillin resistance detected in 48% of Staphylococcus aureus strains, carbapenem resistance detected in 69% of Acinetobacter spp., in 38% of Klebsiella pneumoniae, and in 37% of Pseudomonas spp. Prior hospitalization and antibiotic exposure have been identified as risk factors for infections caused by resistant bacteria in different studies. Patients with BSIs caused by resistant strains showed an increased risk of mortality, which may be explained by a higher incidence of inappropriate empirical therapy in different studies. The molecular genetic characterization of resistant bacteria allows the understanding of the most common mechanisms underlying their resistance and the adoption of surveillance measures. Knowledge of epidemiology, risk factors, mechanisms of resistance, and outcomes of BSIs caused by resistant bacteria may have a major influence on global management of ICU patients. The aim of this review is to provide the clinician an update on BSIs caused by resistant bacteria in ICU patients.

AB - Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are among the leading infections in critically ill patients. The case-fatality rate associated with BSIs in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) reaches 35%-50%. The emergence and diffusion of bacteria with resistance to antibiotics is a global health problem. Multidrug-resistant bacteria were detected in 50.7% of patients with BSIs in a recently published international observational study, with methicillin resistance detected in 48% of Staphylococcus aureus strains, carbapenem resistance detected in 69% of Acinetobacter spp., in 38% of Klebsiella pneumoniae, and in 37% of Pseudomonas spp. Prior hospitalization and antibiotic exposure have been identified as risk factors for infections caused by resistant bacteria in different studies. Patients with BSIs caused by resistant strains showed an increased risk of mortality, which may be explained by a higher incidence of inappropriate empirical therapy in different studies. The molecular genetic characterization of resistant bacteria allows the understanding of the most common mechanisms underlying their resistance and the adoption of surveillance measures. Knowledge of epidemiology, risk factors, mechanisms of resistance, and outcomes of BSIs caused by resistant bacteria may have a major influence on global management of ICU patients. The aim of this review is to provide the clinician an update on BSIs caused by resistant bacteria in ICU patients.

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/146132

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 287

EP - 296

JO - Infection and Drug Resistance

JF - Infection and Drug Resistance

SN - 1178-6973

ER -