Benthic microbial indicators of fish farm impact in a coastal area of the Tyrrhenian Sea

Antonio Mazzola, Tiziana La Rosa, Teresa Luciana Maugeri, Simone Mirto

Risultato della ricerca: Article

41 Citazioni (Scopus)

Abstract

We studied the impact of organic loads due to the biodeposition of a fish farm in a nonimpacted coastal area of the Tyrrhenian Sea (Western Mediterranean). Sediment chemistry and benthic microbial community were investigated from July 1997 to February 1998 on monthly basis at two stations: one was located under the fish farm, while the second was about 1 km away, and served as a reference site. The presence of the cage induced rapid changes in the benthic conditions: the sediments were rapidly (after 6 weeks) reduced. A significant accumulation of biopolymeric carbon was observed beneath the cage both 2 weeks after the initial cage deployment, on non-impacted sediments, and 5–7 months after, and appeared to be related to the fish farm production cycle. The density of microbial communities beneath the fish farm increased only during the first month of farming activity (July) and partially 7 months after cage disposal (i.e. in January), when there was a significant sediment organic enrichment. Additional evidence of rapid impact of the fish farm on the benthic bacterial communities is provided by the increase in the numbers of autofluorescent microbial cells. The photosynthetic eukaryotic cells displayed a highly reduced contribution to total autofluorescent microbial density, indicating that their decrease is related with biopolymeric carbon accumulation, and probably was due also to ‘‘shadow effect’’ induced by suspended material, coming from the fish farm, on the environment below. We propose here, to apply the ratio of culturable heterotrophic bacteria to microbial direct counts (CFU/MDC) to detect fish farm impact. In cage sediments, organic enrichment and the consequent modification of the characteristics of the benthic environment, determined an increase in aerobic heterotrophicbacteria and vibrio density indicating that they are efficient colonizers of organic-rich sediments. Densities of Escherichia coli and Enterococci were not significantly higher than in the reference site, and are likely of terrestrial origin. Thus they cannot be used as specific indicators of fish farm impact.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)153-167
Numero di pagine15
RivistaAquaculture
Volume230
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Tyrrhenian Sea
fish farms
farm
fish
cages
sediments
sediment
microbial communities
microbial community
benthic environment
sediment chemistry
benthic zone
indicator
coastal area
sea
carbon
Vibrio
Enterococcus
bacterial communities
eukaryotic cells

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aquatic Science

Cita questo

Benthic microbial indicators of fish farm impact in a coastal area of the Tyrrhenian Sea. / Mazzola, Antonio; La Rosa, Tiziana; Maugeri, Teresa Luciana; Mirto, Simone.

In: Aquaculture, Vol. 230, 2004, pag. 153-167.

Risultato della ricerca: Article

Mazzola, A, La Rosa, T, Maugeri, TL & Mirto, S 2004, 'Benthic microbial indicators of fish farm impact in a coastal area of the Tyrrhenian Sea', Aquaculture, vol. 230, pagg. 153-167.
Mazzola, Antonio ; La Rosa, Tiziana ; Maugeri, Teresa Luciana ; Mirto, Simone. / Benthic microbial indicators of fish farm impact in a coastal area of the Tyrrhenian Sea. In: Aquaculture. 2004 ; Vol. 230. pagg. 153-167.
@article{eb8870f3eb77471cb6b712e315bc02bb,
title = "Benthic microbial indicators of fish farm impact in a coastal area of the Tyrrhenian Sea",
abstract = "We studied the impact of organic loads due to the biodeposition of a fish farm in a nonimpacted coastal area of the Tyrrhenian Sea (Western Mediterranean). Sediment chemistry and benthic microbial community were investigated from July 1997 to February 1998 on monthly basis at two stations: one was located under the fish farm, while the second was about 1 km away, and served as a reference site. The presence of the cage induced rapid changes in the benthic conditions: the sediments were rapidly (after 6 weeks) reduced. A significant accumulation of biopolymeric carbon was observed beneath the cage both 2 weeks after the initial cage deployment, on non-impacted sediments, and 5–7 months after, and appeared to be related to the fish farm production cycle. The density of microbial communities beneath the fish farm increased only during the first month of farming activity (July) and partially 7 months after cage disposal (i.e. in January), when there was a significant sediment organic enrichment. Additional evidence of rapid impact of the fish farm on the benthic bacterial communities is provided by the increase in the numbers of autofluorescent microbial cells. The photosynthetic eukaryotic cells displayed a highly reduced contribution to total autofluorescent microbial density, indicating that their decrease is related with biopolymeric carbon accumulation, and probably was due also to ‘‘shadow effect’’ induced by suspended material, coming from the fish farm, on the environment below. We propose here, to apply the ratio of culturable heterotrophic bacteria to microbial direct counts (CFU/MDC) to detect fish farm impact. In cage sediments, organic enrichment and the consequent modification of the characteristics of the benthic environment, determined an increase in aerobic heterotrophicbacteria and vibrio density indicating that they are efficient colonizers of organic-rich sediments. Densities of Escherichia coli and Enterococci were not significantly higher than in the reference site, and are likely of terrestrial origin. Thus they cannot be used as specific indicators of fish farm impact.",
author = "Antonio Mazzola and {La Rosa}, Tiziana and Maugeri, {Teresa Luciana} and Simone Mirto",
year = "2004",
language = "English",
volume = "230",
pages = "153--167",
journal = "Aquaculture",
issn = "0044-8486",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Benthic microbial indicators of fish farm impact in a coastal area of the Tyrrhenian Sea

AU - Mazzola, Antonio

AU - La Rosa, Tiziana

AU - Maugeri, Teresa Luciana

AU - Mirto, Simone

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - We studied the impact of organic loads due to the biodeposition of a fish farm in a nonimpacted coastal area of the Tyrrhenian Sea (Western Mediterranean). Sediment chemistry and benthic microbial community were investigated from July 1997 to February 1998 on monthly basis at two stations: one was located under the fish farm, while the second was about 1 km away, and served as a reference site. The presence of the cage induced rapid changes in the benthic conditions: the sediments were rapidly (after 6 weeks) reduced. A significant accumulation of biopolymeric carbon was observed beneath the cage both 2 weeks after the initial cage deployment, on non-impacted sediments, and 5–7 months after, and appeared to be related to the fish farm production cycle. The density of microbial communities beneath the fish farm increased only during the first month of farming activity (July) and partially 7 months after cage disposal (i.e. in January), when there was a significant sediment organic enrichment. Additional evidence of rapid impact of the fish farm on the benthic bacterial communities is provided by the increase in the numbers of autofluorescent microbial cells. The photosynthetic eukaryotic cells displayed a highly reduced contribution to total autofluorescent microbial density, indicating that their decrease is related with biopolymeric carbon accumulation, and probably was due also to ‘‘shadow effect’’ induced by suspended material, coming from the fish farm, on the environment below. We propose here, to apply the ratio of culturable heterotrophic bacteria to microbial direct counts (CFU/MDC) to detect fish farm impact. In cage sediments, organic enrichment and the consequent modification of the characteristics of the benthic environment, determined an increase in aerobic heterotrophicbacteria and vibrio density indicating that they are efficient colonizers of organic-rich sediments. Densities of Escherichia coli and Enterococci were not significantly higher than in the reference site, and are likely of terrestrial origin. Thus they cannot be used as specific indicators of fish farm impact.

AB - We studied the impact of organic loads due to the biodeposition of a fish farm in a nonimpacted coastal area of the Tyrrhenian Sea (Western Mediterranean). Sediment chemistry and benthic microbial community were investigated from July 1997 to February 1998 on monthly basis at two stations: one was located under the fish farm, while the second was about 1 km away, and served as a reference site. The presence of the cage induced rapid changes in the benthic conditions: the sediments were rapidly (after 6 weeks) reduced. A significant accumulation of biopolymeric carbon was observed beneath the cage both 2 weeks after the initial cage deployment, on non-impacted sediments, and 5–7 months after, and appeared to be related to the fish farm production cycle. The density of microbial communities beneath the fish farm increased only during the first month of farming activity (July) and partially 7 months after cage disposal (i.e. in January), when there was a significant sediment organic enrichment. Additional evidence of rapid impact of the fish farm on the benthic bacterial communities is provided by the increase in the numbers of autofluorescent microbial cells. The photosynthetic eukaryotic cells displayed a highly reduced contribution to total autofluorescent microbial density, indicating that their decrease is related with biopolymeric carbon accumulation, and probably was due also to ‘‘shadow effect’’ induced by suspended material, coming from the fish farm, on the environment below. We propose here, to apply the ratio of culturable heterotrophic bacteria to microbial direct counts (CFU/MDC) to detect fish farm impact. In cage sediments, organic enrichment and the consequent modification of the characteristics of the benthic environment, determined an increase in aerobic heterotrophicbacteria and vibrio density indicating that they are efficient colonizers of organic-rich sediments. Densities of Escherichia coli and Enterococci were not significantly higher than in the reference site, and are likely of terrestrial origin. Thus they cannot be used as specific indicators of fish farm impact.

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/5098

M3 - Article

VL - 230

SP - 153

EP - 167

JO - Aquaculture

JF - Aquaculture

SN - 0044-8486

ER -