Behavioural and pharmacological characterization of a novel cannabinomimetic adamantane-derived indole, APICA, and considerations on the possible misuse as a psychotropic spice abuse, in C57bl/6J mice

Anna Brancato, Carla Cannizzaro, Antonina Argo, Paolo Procaccianti, Eleonora Casagni, Ermanno Valoti, Gabriella Roda, Rino Froldi, Veniero Gambaro, Laura Fumagalli, Ginevra Malta

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Abstract

The novel adamantane derivative APICA (N-(adamantan-1-yl)-1-pentyl-1H-indole-3-carboxamide) was recently identified as a cannabinomimetic indole of abuse. Despite its novel structure, APICA recalls cannabinomimetic indoles, such as representative member JWH-018.In present study, the effects of APICA (1-3 mg/kg, i.p.) were tested in C57BL/6J mice, in the Tetrad task which includes the assessment of: body temperature; locomotor activity and behavioural reactivity; nociception; motor coordination; declarative memory. Furthermore, pre-treatment with the CB1 antagonist AM251 (3 mg/kg, i.p.) or the CB2 antagonist AM630 (3 mg/kg, i.p.) was carried out to characterize APICA activity.Our results show that APICA was able to dose-dependently decrease locomotor activity and behavioural reactivity in the open field, whereas only the highest dose was able to induce hypothermia, analgesia, motor incoordination and recognition memory impairment, with respect to vehicle (p < 0.01; p < 0.001).The pretreatment with the CB1 antagonist AM251 elicited an increase in body temperature, total distance travelled in the open field, latency to fall down in the Rotarod, and a decrease in tail flick latency (p < 0.05; p < 0.01). On the other hand, pretreatment with AM630 did not induced significant differences on APICA effects.This study supports preliminary reports on APICA cannabinomimetic properties, extending its detrimental effects on cognitive function. Moreover, these properties can be attributed to the CB1 receptor activity, indicating APICA as a selective CB1 receptor agonist.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)6-12
Numero di pagine7
RivistaForensic Science International
Volume265
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2016

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Adamantane
Spices
Pharmacology
Cannabinoid Receptor CB1
Locomotion
Body Temperature
Indoles
indole
Nociception
Ataxia
Hypothermia
Inbred C57BL Mouse
Analgesia
Cognition
Tail

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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title = "Behavioural and pharmacological characterization of a novel cannabinomimetic adamantane-derived indole, APICA, and considerations on the possible misuse as a psychotropic spice abuse, in C57bl/6J mice",
abstract = "The novel adamantane derivative APICA (N-(adamantan-1-yl)-1-pentyl-1H-indole-3-carboxamide) was recently identified as a cannabinomimetic indole of abuse. Despite its novel structure, APICA recalls cannabinomimetic indoles, such as representative member JWH-018.In present study, the effects of APICA (1-3 mg/kg, i.p.) were tested in C57BL/6J mice, in the Tetrad task which includes the assessment of: body temperature; locomotor activity and behavioural reactivity; nociception; motor coordination; declarative memory. Furthermore, pre-treatment with the CB1 antagonist AM251 (3 mg/kg, i.p.) or the CB2 antagonist AM630 (3 mg/kg, i.p.) was carried out to characterize APICA activity.Our results show that APICA was able to dose-dependently decrease locomotor activity and behavioural reactivity in the open field, whereas only the highest dose was able to induce hypothermia, analgesia, motor incoordination and recognition memory impairment, with respect to vehicle (p < 0.01; p < 0.001).The pretreatment with the CB1 antagonist AM251 elicited an increase in body temperature, total distance travelled in the open field, latency to fall down in the Rotarod, and a decrease in tail flick latency (p < 0.05; p < 0.01). On the other hand, pretreatment with AM630 did not induced significant differences on APICA effects.This study supports preliminary reports on APICA cannabinomimetic properties, extending its detrimental effects on cognitive function. Moreover, these properties can be attributed to the CB1 receptor activity, indicating APICA as a selective CB1 receptor agonist.",
keywords = "2734, APICA, CB1 agonist, New psychotropic substances, Synthetic cannabinoid",
author = "Anna Brancato and Carla Cannizzaro and Antonina Argo and Paolo Procaccianti and Eleonora Casagni and Ermanno Valoti and Gabriella Roda and Rino Froldi and Veniero Gambaro and Laura Fumagalli and Ginevra Malta",
year = "2016",
language = "English",
volume = "265",
pages = "6--12",
journal = "Forensic Science International",
issn = "0379-0738",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Behavioural and pharmacological characterization of a novel cannabinomimetic adamantane-derived indole, APICA, and considerations on the possible misuse as a psychotropic spice abuse, in C57bl/6J mice

AU - Brancato, Anna

AU - Cannizzaro, Carla

AU - Argo, Antonina

AU - Procaccianti, Paolo

AU - Casagni, Eleonora

AU - Valoti, Ermanno

AU - Roda, Gabriella

AU - Froldi, Rino

AU - Gambaro, Veniero

AU - Fumagalli, Laura

AU - Malta, Ginevra

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - The novel adamantane derivative APICA (N-(adamantan-1-yl)-1-pentyl-1H-indole-3-carboxamide) was recently identified as a cannabinomimetic indole of abuse. Despite its novel structure, APICA recalls cannabinomimetic indoles, such as representative member JWH-018.In present study, the effects of APICA (1-3 mg/kg, i.p.) were tested in C57BL/6J mice, in the Tetrad task which includes the assessment of: body temperature; locomotor activity and behavioural reactivity; nociception; motor coordination; declarative memory. Furthermore, pre-treatment with the CB1 antagonist AM251 (3 mg/kg, i.p.) or the CB2 antagonist AM630 (3 mg/kg, i.p.) was carried out to characterize APICA activity.Our results show that APICA was able to dose-dependently decrease locomotor activity and behavioural reactivity in the open field, whereas only the highest dose was able to induce hypothermia, analgesia, motor incoordination and recognition memory impairment, with respect to vehicle (p < 0.01; p < 0.001).The pretreatment with the CB1 antagonist AM251 elicited an increase in body temperature, total distance travelled in the open field, latency to fall down in the Rotarod, and a decrease in tail flick latency (p < 0.05; p < 0.01). On the other hand, pretreatment with AM630 did not induced significant differences on APICA effects.This study supports preliminary reports on APICA cannabinomimetic properties, extending its detrimental effects on cognitive function. Moreover, these properties can be attributed to the CB1 receptor activity, indicating APICA as a selective CB1 receptor agonist.

AB - The novel adamantane derivative APICA (N-(adamantan-1-yl)-1-pentyl-1H-indole-3-carboxamide) was recently identified as a cannabinomimetic indole of abuse. Despite its novel structure, APICA recalls cannabinomimetic indoles, such as representative member JWH-018.In present study, the effects of APICA (1-3 mg/kg, i.p.) were tested in C57BL/6J mice, in the Tetrad task which includes the assessment of: body temperature; locomotor activity and behavioural reactivity; nociception; motor coordination; declarative memory. Furthermore, pre-treatment with the CB1 antagonist AM251 (3 mg/kg, i.p.) or the CB2 antagonist AM630 (3 mg/kg, i.p.) was carried out to characterize APICA activity.Our results show that APICA was able to dose-dependently decrease locomotor activity and behavioural reactivity in the open field, whereas only the highest dose was able to induce hypothermia, analgesia, motor incoordination and recognition memory impairment, with respect to vehicle (p < 0.01; p < 0.001).The pretreatment with the CB1 antagonist AM251 elicited an increase in body temperature, total distance travelled in the open field, latency to fall down in the Rotarod, and a decrease in tail flick latency (p < 0.05; p < 0.01). On the other hand, pretreatment with AM630 did not induced significant differences on APICA effects.This study supports preliminary reports on APICA cannabinomimetic properties, extending its detrimental effects on cognitive function. Moreover, these properties can be attributed to the CB1 receptor activity, indicating APICA as a selective CB1 receptor agonist.

KW - 2734

KW - APICA

KW - CB1 agonist

KW - New psychotropic substances

KW - Synthetic cannabinoid

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/216350

UR - http://www.elsevier.com/locate/forsciint

M3 - Article

VL - 265

SP - 6

EP - 12

JO - Forensic Science International

JF - Forensic Science International

SN - 0379-0738

ER -