Assessing hydrological connectivity inside a soil by fast-field-cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry and its link to sediment delivery processes

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Abstract

Aim of the paper was the assessment of the hydrological connectivity inside the soil (HCS) and its link to sediment delivery processes at the plot-scale. The expression ”hydrological connectivity inside the soil” has been used here to indicate how spatial patterns inside the soil (i.e. the structural connectivity) interact with physical and chemical processes (i.e. the functional connectivity) in order to determine the subsurface flow (i.e. the water transfer), thereby explaining how sediment transport due to surface runoff (i.e. the soil particle transfer) can be affected. Soils sampled at the upstream- and downstream-end of three different length plots were collected together with sediments from the storage tanks at the end of each plot. All the samples were analyzed by traditional soil analyses (i.e. texture, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance, C and N elemental contents) and fast field cycling (FFC) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. Results revealed that selective erosion phenomena and sediment transport are responsible for the particle size homogeneity in the sediment samples as compared to the upstream- and downstream-end soils. Moreover, while structural connectivity is more efficient in the upstream-end soil samples, functional connectivity appeared more efficient in the downstream-end and sediment samples. Further studies are needed in order to quantitatively assess FFC NMR relaxometry for HCS evaluation.
Lingua originaleEnglish
Numero di pagine9
RivistaEnvironmental Earth Sciences
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2017

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nuclear magnetic resonance
nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy
connectivity
Sediments
Nuclear magnetic resonance
Soils
sediments
sediment
soil
sediment transport
Sediment transport
subsurface flow
Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy
storage tank
sampling
reflectance
Runoff
FTIR spectroscopy
chemical process
particle size

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Pollution
  • Geology
  • Earth-Surface Processes

Cita questo

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title = "Assessing hydrological connectivity inside a soil by fast-field-cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry and its link to sediment delivery processes",
abstract = "Aim of the paper was the assessment of the hydrological connectivity inside the soil (HCS) and its link to sediment delivery processes at the plot-scale. The expression ”hydrological connectivity inside the soil” has been used here to indicate how spatial patterns inside the soil (i.e. the structural connectivity) interact with physical and chemical processes (i.e. the functional connectivity) in order to determine the subsurface flow (i.e. the water transfer), thereby explaining how sediment transport due to surface runoff (i.e. the soil particle transfer) can be affected. Soils sampled at the upstream- and downstream-end of three different length plots were collected together with sediments from the storage tanks at the end of each plot. All the samples were analyzed by traditional soil analyses (i.e. texture, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance, C and N elemental contents) and fast field cycling (FFC) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. Results revealed that selective erosion phenomena and sediment transport are responsible for the particle size homogeneity in the sediment samples as compared to the upstream- and downstream-end soils. Moreover, while structural connectivity is more efficient in the upstream-end soil samples, functional connectivity appeared more efficient in the downstream-end and sediment samples. Further studies are needed in order to quantitatively assess FFC NMR relaxometry for HCS evaluation.",
keywords = "Fast field cycling, Hydrological connectivity, Nuclear magnetic resonance, Relaxometry, Sediment delivery processes",
author = "Eristanna Palazzolo and Pellegrino Conte and Laudicina, {Vito Armando} and Vito Ferro and {Di Stefano}, Costanza",
year = "2017",
language = "English",
journal = "Environmental Earth Sciences",
issn = "1866-6280",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Assessing hydrological connectivity inside a soil by fast-field-cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry and its link to sediment delivery processes

AU - Palazzolo, Eristanna

AU - Conte, Pellegrino

AU - Laudicina, Vito Armando

AU - Ferro, Vito

AU - Di Stefano, Costanza

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Aim of the paper was the assessment of the hydrological connectivity inside the soil (HCS) and its link to sediment delivery processes at the plot-scale. The expression ”hydrological connectivity inside the soil” has been used here to indicate how spatial patterns inside the soil (i.e. the structural connectivity) interact with physical and chemical processes (i.e. the functional connectivity) in order to determine the subsurface flow (i.e. the water transfer), thereby explaining how sediment transport due to surface runoff (i.e. the soil particle transfer) can be affected. Soils sampled at the upstream- and downstream-end of three different length plots were collected together with sediments from the storage tanks at the end of each plot. All the samples were analyzed by traditional soil analyses (i.e. texture, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance, C and N elemental contents) and fast field cycling (FFC) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. Results revealed that selective erosion phenomena and sediment transport are responsible for the particle size homogeneity in the sediment samples as compared to the upstream- and downstream-end soils. Moreover, while structural connectivity is more efficient in the upstream-end soil samples, functional connectivity appeared more efficient in the downstream-end and sediment samples. Further studies are needed in order to quantitatively assess FFC NMR relaxometry for HCS evaluation.

AB - Aim of the paper was the assessment of the hydrological connectivity inside the soil (HCS) and its link to sediment delivery processes at the plot-scale. The expression ”hydrological connectivity inside the soil” has been used here to indicate how spatial patterns inside the soil (i.e. the structural connectivity) interact with physical and chemical processes (i.e. the functional connectivity) in order to determine the subsurface flow (i.e. the water transfer), thereby explaining how sediment transport due to surface runoff (i.e. the soil particle transfer) can be affected. Soils sampled at the upstream- and downstream-end of three different length plots were collected together with sediments from the storage tanks at the end of each plot. All the samples were analyzed by traditional soil analyses (i.e. texture, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance, C and N elemental contents) and fast field cycling (FFC) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. Results revealed that selective erosion phenomena and sediment transport are responsible for the particle size homogeneity in the sediment samples as compared to the upstream- and downstream-end soils. Moreover, while structural connectivity is more efficient in the upstream-end soil samples, functional connectivity appeared more efficient in the downstream-end and sediment samples. Further studies are needed in order to quantitatively assess FFC NMR relaxometry for HCS evaluation.

KW - Fast field cycling

KW - Hydrological connectivity

KW - Nuclear magnetic resonance

KW - Relaxometry

KW - Sediment delivery processes

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/266734

M3 - Article

JO - Environmental Earth Sciences

JF - Environmental Earth Sciences

SN - 1866-6280

ER -