Asking for medical help by posting on the net: genre, functions and ethical issues

Risultato della ricerca: Other contribution

Abstract

On the basis of the growing of the number of sites related to health issues and online conversation, statisticalresearch tend to acknowledge that the communication practices of health message boards have significant rolesto play in the era of online counseling (Anderson, 2003; Kim & Yoon, 2011; Mulholland, 1999; Eysenbach andDiepgen 1999; O'Connor and Johanson 2000; Shuyler and Knight 2003; Gooden and Winefield 2007). However,one of the main worries concerning these spaces has been the uncontrolled information that is provided by userswith no defined roles and who do not/cannot take responsibility for what they say. Previous studies wereintended to explore how people discussing health issues use health-related online communities or doctoranswerssupport frames to access information and support. This research, conversely, explores theheterogeneous territory of new media health care discourse questioning whether Computer Mediated MedicalCommunication may represent a new genre and consequently may address new functions (Campagna et al.,2012). In addition, starting from the most common definition of medical ethics, the study investigates whetherCMMC can meet the expectations of the patient, the role of the physician and eventually how doctors addressissues such as the individuality of the medical response and the self-positioning with respect to the certainty ofvirtual diagnoses. In particular, this paper examines a wide array of authentic examples from medical messageboards analyzing by means of Discourse Analysis the ways in which participants construct positions andcommitment toward advice, opinions and suggestions (Van der Auwera and Plungian, 1998; Nuyts, 2001; Bybeeet al. 1994; Cornillie 2009; Marìn 2004; Hyland, 2002).The analysis attempts to understand how healthcommunication is changing in an online environment and what results are produced by the shift from a doctorto-patient frame to user-to-user frame in terms of authorship and responsibility toward utterances.
Lingua originaleEnglish
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2014

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genre
health
responsibility
individuality
internet community
medical ethics
discourse analysis
new media
counseling
conversation
physician
health care
discourse
communication

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title = "Asking for medical help by posting on the net: genre, functions and ethical issues",
abstract = "On the basis of the growing of the number of sites related to health issues and online conversation, statisticalresearch tend to acknowledge that the communication practices of health message boards have significant rolesto play in the era of online counseling (Anderson, 2003; Kim & Yoon, 2011; Mulholland, 1999; Eysenbach andDiepgen 1999; O'Connor and Johanson 2000; Shuyler and Knight 2003; Gooden and Winefield 2007). However,one of the main worries concerning these spaces has been the uncontrolled information that is provided by userswith no defined roles and who do not/cannot take responsibility for what they say. Previous studies wereintended to explore how people discussing health issues use health-related online communities or doctoranswerssupport frames to access information and support. This research, conversely, explores theheterogeneous territory of new media health care discourse questioning whether Computer Mediated MedicalCommunication may represent a new genre and consequently may address new functions (Campagna et al.,2012). In addition, starting from the most common definition of medical ethics, the study investigates whetherCMMC can meet the expectations of the patient, the role of the physician and eventually how doctors addressissues such as the individuality of the medical response and the self-positioning with respect to the certainty ofvirtual diagnoses. In particular, this paper examines a wide array of authentic examples from medical messageboards analyzing by means of Discourse Analysis the ways in which participants construct positions andcommitment toward advice, opinions and suggestions (Van der Auwera and Plungian, 1998; Nuyts, 2001; Bybeeet al. 1994; Cornillie 2009; Mar{\`i}n 2004; Hyland, 2002).The analysis attempts to understand how healthcommunication is changing in an online environment and what results are produced by the shift from a doctorto-patient frame to user-to-user frame in terms of authorship and responsibility toward utterances.",
author = "Zummo, {Marianna Lya}",
year = "2014",
language = "English",
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AU - Zummo, Marianna Lya

PY - 2014

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N2 - On the basis of the growing of the number of sites related to health issues and online conversation, statisticalresearch tend to acknowledge that the communication practices of health message boards have significant rolesto play in the era of online counseling (Anderson, 2003; Kim & Yoon, 2011; Mulholland, 1999; Eysenbach andDiepgen 1999; O'Connor and Johanson 2000; Shuyler and Knight 2003; Gooden and Winefield 2007). However,one of the main worries concerning these spaces has been the uncontrolled information that is provided by userswith no defined roles and who do not/cannot take responsibility for what they say. Previous studies wereintended to explore how people discussing health issues use health-related online communities or doctoranswerssupport frames to access information and support. This research, conversely, explores theheterogeneous territory of new media health care discourse questioning whether Computer Mediated MedicalCommunication may represent a new genre and consequently may address new functions (Campagna et al.,2012). In addition, starting from the most common definition of medical ethics, the study investigates whetherCMMC can meet the expectations of the patient, the role of the physician and eventually how doctors addressissues such as the individuality of the medical response and the self-positioning with respect to the certainty ofvirtual diagnoses. In particular, this paper examines a wide array of authentic examples from medical messageboards analyzing by means of Discourse Analysis the ways in which participants construct positions andcommitment toward advice, opinions and suggestions (Van der Auwera and Plungian, 1998; Nuyts, 2001; Bybeeet al. 1994; Cornillie 2009; Marìn 2004; Hyland, 2002).The analysis attempts to understand how healthcommunication is changing in an online environment and what results are produced by the shift from a doctorto-patient frame to user-to-user frame in terms of authorship and responsibility toward utterances.

AB - On the basis of the growing of the number of sites related to health issues and online conversation, statisticalresearch tend to acknowledge that the communication practices of health message boards have significant rolesto play in the era of online counseling (Anderson, 2003; Kim & Yoon, 2011; Mulholland, 1999; Eysenbach andDiepgen 1999; O'Connor and Johanson 2000; Shuyler and Knight 2003; Gooden and Winefield 2007). However,one of the main worries concerning these spaces has been the uncontrolled information that is provided by userswith no defined roles and who do not/cannot take responsibility for what they say. Previous studies wereintended to explore how people discussing health issues use health-related online communities or doctoranswerssupport frames to access information and support. This research, conversely, explores theheterogeneous territory of new media health care discourse questioning whether Computer Mediated MedicalCommunication may represent a new genre and consequently may address new functions (Campagna et al.,2012). In addition, starting from the most common definition of medical ethics, the study investigates whetherCMMC can meet the expectations of the patient, the role of the physician and eventually how doctors addressissues such as the individuality of the medical response and the self-positioning with respect to the certainty ofvirtual diagnoses. In particular, this paper examines a wide array of authentic examples from medical messageboards analyzing by means of Discourse Analysis the ways in which participants construct positions andcommitment toward advice, opinions and suggestions (Van der Auwera and Plungian, 1998; Nuyts, 2001; Bybeeet al. 1994; Cornillie 2009; Marìn 2004; Hyland, 2002).The analysis attempts to understand how healthcommunication is changing in an online environment and what results are produced by the shift from a doctorto-patient frame to user-to-user frame in terms of authorship and responsibility toward utterances.

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/99083

M3 - Other contribution

ER -