Advanced energetics of a Multiple-Effects-Evaporation (MEE) desalination plant.Part II: Potential of the cost formation process and prospects for energy savingby process integration

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Abstract

This paper represents the 2nd part of a paper in two parts. In part I a 2nd Principle analysis of a Multiple-Effects-Evaporation (MEE) process has been proposed. In this Part II perspectives for process improvement will be investigated, along two distinct research lines: the thermoeconomics-aided optimization of a newsystem and the increase of thermal efficiency for existing systems by a pinch-based plant retrofit. As concerns the first research line, a detailed productive structure for the plant stage (i.e. effect) examined in Part I is presented; the cost formation structure is then used to improve a simplified optimization process,revealing capable to properly reflect the interactions among exergy flows. It is shown that the flash at brine inlet and the exergy destruction at the pre-heaters, both apparently playing a secondary role with respect to heat transfer at the evaporators, become main sources of irreversibility when the ΔT between two consecutive effects increases. Then, as a corollary to the low exergetic efficiency calculated in Part I of this paper, the potential for exergy saving through process integration is discussed. Although detailed calculations are not included, a conceptual application of pinch-based techniques is proposed, which revealsscarce margins for integration at process level and a much higher potential for process/hot-utility integration. The use of heat cascades can be optimized looking at the Thermal Desalination Process as a blackbox; economics of cogeneration systems integrated with the desalination plant and targeted on heat supply, in fact, essentially depends on the cost of feed steam, fuel and electricity.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)44-52
Numero di pagine9
RivistaDESALINATION
VolumeDesalination, Vol. 259
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2010

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exergy
Desalination
Exergy
Evaporation
energetics
evaporation
cost
Costs
cogeneration
desalination
brine
heat transfer
electricity
Steam
Evaporators
Electricity
Heat transfer
economics
Economics
energy process

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Mechanical Engineering

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title = "Advanced energetics of a Multiple-Effects-Evaporation (MEE) desalination plant.Part II: Potential of the cost formation process and prospects for energy savingby process integration",
abstract = "This paper represents the 2nd part of a paper in two parts. In part I a 2nd Principle analysis of a Multiple-Effects-Evaporation (MEE) process has been proposed. In this Part II perspectives for process improvement will be investigated, along two distinct research lines: the thermoeconomics-aided optimization of a newsystem and the increase of thermal efficiency for existing systems by a pinch-based plant retrofit. As concerns the first research line, a detailed productive structure for the plant stage (i.e. effect) examined in Part I is presented; the cost formation structure is then used to improve a simplified optimization process,revealing capable to properly reflect the interactions among exergy flows. It is shown that the flash at brine inlet and the exergy destruction at the pre-heaters, both apparently playing a secondary role with respect to heat transfer at the evaporators, become main sources of irreversibility when the ΔT between two consecutive effects increases. Then, as a corollary to the low exergetic efficiency calculated in Part I of this paper, the potential for exergy saving through process integration is discussed. Although detailed calculations are not included, a conceptual application of pinch-based techniques is proposed, which revealsscarce margins for integration at process level and a much higher potential for process/hot-utility integration. The use of heat cascades can be optimized looking at the Thermal Desalination Process as a blackbox; economics of cogeneration systems integrated with the desalination plant and targeted on heat supply, in fact, essentially depends on the cost of feed steam, fuel and electricity.",
keywords = "Cost minimization, Desalination, Multiple-Effects-Evaporation, Pinch analysis, Process integration, Thermoeconomics",
author = "Antonio Piacentino and Ennio Cardona",
year = "2010",
language = "English",
volume = "Desalination, Vol. 259",
pages = "44--52",
journal = "DESALINATION",
issn = "0011-9164",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Advanced energetics of a Multiple-Effects-Evaporation (MEE) desalination plant.Part II: Potential of the cost formation process and prospects for energy savingby process integration

AU - Piacentino, Antonio

AU - Cardona, Ennio

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - This paper represents the 2nd part of a paper in two parts. In part I a 2nd Principle analysis of a Multiple-Effects-Evaporation (MEE) process has been proposed. In this Part II perspectives for process improvement will be investigated, along two distinct research lines: the thermoeconomics-aided optimization of a newsystem and the increase of thermal efficiency for existing systems by a pinch-based plant retrofit. As concerns the first research line, a detailed productive structure for the plant stage (i.e. effect) examined in Part I is presented; the cost formation structure is then used to improve a simplified optimization process,revealing capable to properly reflect the interactions among exergy flows. It is shown that the flash at brine inlet and the exergy destruction at the pre-heaters, both apparently playing a secondary role with respect to heat transfer at the evaporators, become main sources of irreversibility when the ΔT between two consecutive effects increases. Then, as a corollary to the low exergetic efficiency calculated in Part I of this paper, the potential for exergy saving through process integration is discussed. Although detailed calculations are not included, a conceptual application of pinch-based techniques is proposed, which revealsscarce margins for integration at process level and a much higher potential for process/hot-utility integration. The use of heat cascades can be optimized looking at the Thermal Desalination Process as a blackbox; economics of cogeneration systems integrated with the desalination plant and targeted on heat supply, in fact, essentially depends on the cost of feed steam, fuel and electricity.

AB - This paper represents the 2nd part of a paper in two parts. In part I a 2nd Principle analysis of a Multiple-Effects-Evaporation (MEE) process has been proposed. In this Part II perspectives for process improvement will be investigated, along two distinct research lines: the thermoeconomics-aided optimization of a newsystem and the increase of thermal efficiency for existing systems by a pinch-based plant retrofit. As concerns the first research line, a detailed productive structure for the plant stage (i.e. effect) examined in Part I is presented; the cost formation structure is then used to improve a simplified optimization process,revealing capable to properly reflect the interactions among exergy flows. It is shown that the flash at brine inlet and the exergy destruction at the pre-heaters, both apparently playing a secondary role with respect to heat transfer at the evaporators, become main sources of irreversibility when the ΔT between two consecutive effects increases. Then, as a corollary to the low exergetic efficiency calculated in Part I of this paper, the potential for exergy saving through process integration is discussed. Although detailed calculations are not included, a conceptual application of pinch-based techniques is proposed, which revealsscarce margins for integration at process level and a much higher potential for process/hot-utility integration. The use of heat cascades can be optimized looking at the Thermal Desalination Process as a blackbox; economics of cogeneration systems integrated with the desalination plant and targeted on heat supply, in fact, essentially depends on the cost of feed steam, fuel and electricity.

KW - Cost minimization

KW - Desalination

KW - Multiple-Effects-Evaporation

KW - Pinch analysis

KW - Process integration

KW - Thermoeconomics

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/54073

M3 - Article

VL - Desalination, Vol. 259

SP - 44

EP - 52

JO - DESALINATION

JF - DESALINATION

SN - 0011-9164

ER -