A systematic review of the literature on the human genetic variations in response to vaccination

Di Giannantonio, P.; Amore, R.; Ricciardi, W.; Boccia, S.

Risultato della ricerca: Other contribution

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Vaccinomics is a term that refers to the investigation of heterogeneity of host genetic markers at the individual or population level that may result in variations of humoral, cell-mediated, and/or innate immune responses to vaccines. Studying genetic heterogeneity of human response to vaccines is supposed to both afford a better understanding of the way vaccine works, and help in developing future vaccines that are protective. With this premise in mind, we performed a systematic review of the literature on the studies concerning the association between human genetic variations in response to vaccination. METHODS: A detailed literature search on the case-control and cohort studied was conducted on Medline and Google. The Medline query was structured as reported below: ((pharmacogenetics[mesh] OR pharmacogen* OR genetic association OR genetic susceptibility OR immunogenetics) AND (vaccine[Mesh] OR vaccin OR vaccina* OR vaccine* OR vaccini* OR vaccino* OR vaccinu*)) OR vaccinom* RESULTS: From the literature search, 1940 articles were retrieved, of which 276 screened by title. After careful abstract reading, 54 resulted eligible, of which 28 articles were eventually deemed eligible. From the 28 articles, more than 50% were conducted in the USA (Minnesota), and were conducted on the MMR (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella) vaccine. The remaining studies were conducted on hepatitis B and A vaccines. The age group most studied ranged between 5 and 18 years. Almost 75% of the primary studies were concerned the HLA (Human Leukocyte antigen) genes, followed by Interleukin (IL), Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). CONCLUSIONS: As the increasing application of vaccinomics due to the application of whole-genome scanning occurs, the ever-growing body of genomic data on the individual inherited vaccine response will be responsibly managed by public health personnel to enable timely improvement of vaccination practices
Lingua originaleEnglish
Numero di pagine1
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2012

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Medical Genetics
Vaccination
Vaccines
Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine
Immunogenetics
Genetic Heterogeneity
Interleukins
Pharmacogenetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
HLA Antigens
Genetic Markers
Innate Immunity
Health Personnel
Reading
Public Health
Age Groups
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Genome
Population

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Di Giannantonio, P.; Amore, R.; Ricciardi, W.; Boccia, S. (2012). A systematic review of the literature on the human genetic variations in response to vaccination.

A systematic review of the literature on the human genetic variations in response to vaccination. / Di Giannantonio, P.; Amore, R.; Ricciardi, W.; Boccia, S.

1 pag. 2012, .

Risultato della ricerca: Other contribution

Di Giannantonio, P.; Amore, R.; Ricciardi, W.; Boccia, S. 2012, A systematic review of the literature on the human genetic variations in response to vaccination..
Di Giannantonio, P.; Amore, R.; Ricciardi, W.; Boccia, S. A systematic review of the literature on the human genetic variations in response to vaccination. 2012. 1 pag.
Di Giannantonio, P.; Amore, R.; Ricciardi, W.; Boccia, S. / A systematic review of the literature on the human genetic variations in response to vaccination. 2012. 1 pag.
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title = "A systematic review of the literature on the human genetic variations in response to vaccination",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Vaccinomics is a term that refers to the investigation of heterogeneity of host genetic markers at the individual or population level that may result in variations of humoral, cell-mediated, and/or innate immune responses to vaccines. Studying genetic heterogeneity of human response to vaccines is supposed to both afford a better understanding of the way vaccine works, and help in developing future vaccines that are protective. With this premise in mind, we performed a systematic review of the literature on the studies concerning the association between human genetic variations in response to vaccination. METHODS: A detailed literature search on the case-control and cohort studied was conducted on Medline and Google. The Medline query was structured as reported below: ((pharmacogenetics[mesh] OR pharmacogen* OR genetic association OR genetic susceptibility OR immunogenetics) AND (vaccine[Mesh] OR vaccin OR vaccina* OR vaccine* OR vaccini* OR vaccino* OR vaccinu*)) OR vaccinom* RESULTS: From the literature search, 1940 articles were retrieved, of which 276 screened by title. After careful abstract reading, 54 resulted eligible, of which 28 articles were eventually deemed eligible. From the 28 articles, more than 50{\%} were conducted in the USA (Minnesota), and were conducted on the MMR (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella) vaccine. The remaining studies were conducted on hepatitis B and A vaccines. The age group most studied ranged between 5 and 18 years. Almost 75{\%} of the primary studies were concerned the HLA (Human Leukocyte antigen) genes, followed by Interleukin (IL), Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). CONCLUSIONS: As the increasing application of vaccinomics due to the application of whole-genome scanning occurs, the ever-growing body of genomic data on the individual inherited vaccine response will be responsibly managed by public health personnel to enable timely improvement of vaccination practices",
keywords = "human genetic variations; response to vaccination",
author = "{Di Giannantonio, P.; Amore, R.; Ricciardi, W.; Boccia, S.} and Walter Mazzucco",
year = "2012",
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T1 - A systematic review of the literature on the human genetic variations in response to vaccination

AU - Di Giannantonio, P.; Amore, R.; Ricciardi, W.; Boccia, S.

AU - Mazzucco, Walter

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - BACKGROUND: Vaccinomics is a term that refers to the investigation of heterogeneity of host genetic markers at the individual or population level that may result in variations of humoral, cell-mediated, and/or innate immune responses to vaccines. Studying genetic heterogeneity of human response to vaccines is supposed to both afford a better understanding of the way vaccine works, and help in developing future vaccines that are protective. With this premise in mind, we performed a systematic review of the literature on the studies concerning the association between human genetic variations in response to vaccination. METHODS: A detailed literature search on the case-control and cohort studied was conducted on Medline and Google. The Medline query was structured as reported below: ((pharmacogenetics[mesh] OR pharmacogen* OR genetic association OR genetic susceptibility OR immunogenetics) AND (vaccine[Mesh] OR vaccin OR vaccina* OR vaccine* OR vaccini* OR vaccino* OR vaccinu*)) OR vaccinom* RESULTS: From the literature search, 1940 articles were retrieved, of which 276 screened by title. After careful abstract reading, 54 resulted eligible, of which 28 articles were eventually deemed eligible. From the 28 articles, more than 50% were conducted in the USA (Minnesota), and were conducted on the MMR (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella) vaccine. The remaining studies were conducted on hepatitis B and A vaccines. The age group most studied ranged between 5 and 18 years. Almost 75% of the primary studies were concerned the HLA (Human Leukocyte antigen) genes, followed by Interleukin (IL), Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). CONCLUSIONS: As the increasing application of vaccinomics due to the application of whole-genome scanning occurs, the ever-growing body of genomic data on the individual inherited vaccine response will be responsibly managed by public health personnel to enable timely improvement of vaccination practices

AB - BACKGROUND: Vaccinomics is a term that refers to the investigation of heterogeneity of host genetic markers at the individual or population level that may result in variations of humoral, cell-mediated, and/or innate immune responses to vaccines. Studying genetic heterogeneity of human response to vaccines is supposed to both afford a better understanding of the way vaccine works, and help in developing future vaccines that are protective. With this premise in mind, we performed a systematic review of the literature on the studies concerning the association between human genetic variations in response to vaccination. METHODS: A detailed literature search on the case-control and cohort studied was conducted on Medline and Google. The Medline query was structured as reported below: ((pharmacogenetics[mesh] OR pharmacogen* OR genetic association OR genetic susceptibility OR immunogenetics) AND (vaccine[Mesh] OR vaccin OR vaccina* OR vaccine* OR vaccini* OR vaccino* OR vaccinu*)) OR vaccinom* RESULTS: From the literature search, 1940 articles were retrieved, of which 276 screened by title. After careful abstract reading, 54 resulted eligible, of which 28 articles were eventually deemed eligible. From the 28 articles, more than 50% were conducted in the USA (Minnesota), and were conducted on the MMR (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella) vaccine. The remaining studies were conducted on hepatitis B and A vaccines. The age group most studied ranged between 5 and 18 years. Almost 75% of the primary studies were concerned the HLA (Human Leukocyte antigen) genes, followed by Interleukin (IL), Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). CONCLUSIONS: As the increasing application of vaccinomics due to the application of whole-genome scanning occurs, the ever-growing body of genomic data on the individual inherited vaccine response will be responsibly managed by public health personnel to enable timely improvement of vaccination practices

KW - human genetic variations; response to vaccination

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/79089

M3 - Other contribution

ER -