A stellar flare-coronal mass ejection event revealed by X-ray plasma motions

Rosaria Bonito, Giovanni Peres, Costanza Argiroffi, Fabio Reale, Marco Miceli, Argiroffi, Ciaravella, Fabio Reale, Orlando, Giovanni Peres, Drake, Paola Testa, Bonito, Miceli

Risultato della ricerca: Article

1 Citazione (Scopus)

Abstract

Coronal mass ejections (CMEs), often associated with flares(1-3), arethe most powerful magnetic phenomena occurring on the Sun. Stars showmagnetic activity levels up to ten thousand times higher(4), and CMEeffects on stellar physics and circumstellar environments are predictedto be substantial(5-9). However, stellar CMEs remain observationallyunexplored. Using time-resolved high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of astellar flare on the active star HR 9024 observed with the High EnergyTransmission Grating Spectrometer onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatoryspace telescope, we distinctly detected Doppler shifts in S xvi, Si xivand Mg xii lines that indicate upward and downward motions of hotplasmas (around 10-25 MK) within the flaring loop, with velocities of100-400 km s(-1), in agreement with a model of a flaring magnetic tube.Most notably, we also detected a later blueshift in the O viii line thatreveals an upward motion, with velocity 90 +/- 30 km s(-1), of coolplasma (about 4 MK), that we ascribe to a CME coupled to the flare. Fromthis evidence we were able to derive a CME mass of 1. 2(-0.8)(+2.6) x10(21) g and a CME kinetic energy of 5. 2(-3.6)(+27.7) x 10(34) erg.These values provide clues in the extrapolation of the solar case tohigher activity levels in other stars, suggesting that CMEs could indeedbe a major cause of mass and angular momentum loss.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)742-748
Numero di pagine7
RivistaNature Astronomy
Volume3
Stato di pubblicazionePublished - 2019

Fingerprint

stellar flares
coronal mass ejection
flares
x rays
stars
stellar physics
extrapolation
angular momentum
kinetic energy
gratings
telescopes
spectrometers
tubes
momentum
causes
shift
high resolution
spectroscopy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics

Cita questo

A stellar flare-coronal mass ejection event revealed by X-ray plasma motions. / Bonito, Rosaria; Peres, Giovanni; Argiroffi, Costanza; Reale, Fabio; Miceli, Marco; Argiroffi; Ciaravella; Reale, Fabio; Orlando; Peres, Giovanni; Drake; Testa, Paola; Bonito; Miceli.

In: Nature Astronomy, Vol. 3, 2019, pag. 742-748.

Risultato della ricerca: Article

Bonito, R, Peres, G, Argiroffi, C, Reale, F, Miceli, M, Argiroffi, Ciaravella, Reale, F, Orlando, Peres, G, Drake, Testa, P, Bonito & Miceli 2019, 'A stellar flare-coronal mass ejection event revealed by X-ray plasma motions', Nature Astronomy, vol. 3, pagg. 742-748.
Bonito, Rosaria ; Peres, Giovanni ; Argiroffi, Costanza ; Reale, Fabio ; Miceli, Marco ; Argiroffi ; Ciaravella ; Reale, Fabio ; Orlando ; Peres, Giovanni ; Drake ; Testa, Paola ; Bonito ; Miceli. / A stellar flare-coronal mass ejection event revealed by X-ray plasma motions. In: Nature Astronomy. 2019 ; Vol. 3. pagg. 742-748.
@article{a26ddd444ef2433588ca7be241ee8a4a,
title = "A stellar flare-coronal mass ejection event revealed by X-ray plasma motions",
abstract = "Coronal mass ejections (CMEs), often associated with flares(1-3), arethe most powerful magnetic phenomena occurring on the Sun. Stars showmagnetic activity levels up to ten thousand times higher(4), and CMEeffects on stellar physics and circumstellar environments are predictedto be substantial(5-9). However, stellar CMEs remain observationallyunexplored. Using time-resolved high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of astellar flare on the active star HR 9024 observed with the High EnergyTransmission Grating Spectrometer onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatoryspace telescope, we distinctly detected Doppler shifts in S xvi, Si xivand Mg xii lines that indicate upward and downward motions of hotplasmas (around 10-25 MK) within the flaring loop, with velocities of100-400 km s(-1), in agreement with a model of a flaring magnetic tube.Most notably, we also detected a later blueshift in the O viii line thatreveals an upward motion, with velocity 90 +/- 30 km s(-1), of coolplasma (about 4 MK), that we ascribe to a CME coupled to the flare. Fromthis evidence we were able to derive a CME mass of 1. 2(-0.8)(+2.6) x10(21) g and a CME kinetic energy of 5. 2(-3.6)(+27.7) x 10(34) erg.These values provide clues in the extrapolation of the solar case tohigher activity levels in other stars, suggesting that CMEs could indeedbe a major cause of mass and angular momentum loss.",
author = "Rosaria Bonito and Giovanni Peres and Costanza Argiroffi and Fabio Reale and Marco Miceli and Argiroffi and Ciaravella and Fabio Reale and Orlando and Giovanni Peres and Drake and Paola Testa and Bonito and Miceli",
year = "2019",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
pages = "742--748",
journal = "Nature Astronomy",
issn = "2397-3366",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A stellar flare-coronal mass ejection event revealed by X-ray plasma motions

AU - Bonito, Rosaria

AU - Peres, Giovanni

AU - Argiroffi, Costanza

AU - Reale, Fabio

AU - Miceli, Marco

AU - Argiroffi, null

AU - Ciaravella, null

AU - Reale, Fabio

AU - Orlando, null

AU - Peres, Giovanni

AU - Drake, null

AU - Testa, Paola

AU - Bonito, null

AU - Miceli, null

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Coronal mass ejections (CMEs), often associated with flares(1-3), arethe most powerful magnetic phenomena occurring on the Sun. Stars showmagnetic activity levels up to ten thousand times higher(4), and CMEeffects on stellar physics and circumstellar environments are predictedto be substantial(5-9). However, stellar CMEs remain observationallyunexplored. Using time-resolved high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of astellar flare on the active star HR 9024 observed with the High EnergyTransmission Grating Spectrometer onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatoryspace telescope, we distinctly detected Doppler shifts in S xvi, Si xivand Mg xii lines that indicate upward and downward motions of hotplasmas (around 10-25 MK) within the flaring loop, with velocities of100-400 km s(-1), in agreement with a model of a flaring magnetic tube.Most notably, we also detected a later blueshift in the O viii line thatreveals an upward motion, with velocity 90 +/- 30 km s(-1), of coolplasma (about 4 MK), that we ascribe to a CME coupled to the flare. Fromthis evidence we were able to derive a CME mass of 1. 2(-0.8)(+2.6) x10(21) g and a CME kinetic energy of 5. 2(-3.6)(+27.7) x 10(34) erg.These values provide clues in the extrapolation of the solar case tohigher activity levels in other stars, suggesting that CMEs could indeedbe a major cause of mass and angular momentum loss.

AB - Coronal mass ejections (CMEs), often associated with flares(1-3), arethe most powerful magnetic phenomena occurring on the Sun. Stars showmagnetic activity levels up to ten thousand times higher(4), and CMEeffects on stellar physics and circumstellar environments are predictedto be substantial(5-9). However, stellar CMEs remain observationallyunexplored. Using time-resolved high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of astellar flare on the active star HR 9024 observed with the High EnergyTransmission Grating Spectrometer onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatoryspace telescope, we distinctly detected Doppler shifts in S xvi, Si xivand Mg xii lines that indicate upward and downward motions of hotplasmas (around 10-25 MK) within the flaring loop, with velocities of100-400 km s(-1), in agreement with a model of a flaring magnetic tube.Most notably, we also detected a later blueshift in the O viii line thatreveals an upward motion, with velocity 90 +/- 30 km s(-1), of coolplasma (about 4 MK), that we ascribe to a CME coupled to the flare. Fromthis evidence we were able to derive a CME mass of 1. 2(-0.8)(+2.6) x10(21) g and a CME kinetic energy of 5. 2(-3.6)(+27.7) x 10(34) erg.These values provide clues in the extrapolation of the solar case tohigher activity levels in other stars, suggesting that CMEs could indeedbe a major cause of mass and angular momentum loss.

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/370530

UR - https://www.nature.com/articles/s41550-019-0781-4

M3 - Article

VL - 3

SP - 742

EP - 748

JO - Nature Astronomy

JF - Nature Astronomy

SN - 2397-3366

ER -