Vox Naturae: The Myth of Animal Nature in the Latin Roman Republic

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Abstract

The paper examines the representation of animals as embodiment of nature in the culture of the late Roman republic. By discussing a selection of passages from Sallust, Cicero and Lucretius in conjunction with other Greek and Latin sources, the paper shows that the typically Western myth of 'animal nature' - the cultural belief that animal mirror a perennial state of nature, as opposed to human society - played a very important role in the ethical debate of the first century BC and took in this period a form which was bound to influence the centuries to come.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAnimals in Greek and Roman Religion and Myth
Pages51-84
Number of pages34
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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