The cork oak in the Mountains of Palermo (Italy): ecological insights from the south-eastern edge of its distribution range

Riccardo Scalenghe, Rafael Da Silveira Bueno, Giovanna Sala, Emilio Badalamenti, Tommaso La Mantia, Salvatore Pasta, Salvatore Pasta, Salvatore Pasta, Giuseppe Maria Pizzurro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The uneven presence of the cork oak (Quercus suber L.) within its distribution range is not only determined by its climatic requirements but also by specific edaphic needs. Although most of the natural populations thrive in acidic soilsderiving from metamorphic or volcanic rock outcrops, some cork oak populations are found growing in soils deriving from calcareous bedrock, which are considered less suitable. We carried out a multidisciplinary investigation at thesouth eastern edge of the Q. suber distribution range (Mountains of Palermo, NW Sicily), including soil, floristic, and vegetation surveys, aimed at: (i) assessing the native or introduced origin of some peculiar cork oak populations; (ii)describing the associated plant communities and soils; (iii) identifying the ecological factors which could explain the local adaptation to soils deriving from calcareous bedrock; (iv) discussing the ecological role played by this species inthe study area and within its distribution range. The collected information suggest that the detected cork oak stands are native to these areas. We hypothesized that the co-occurrence of high fire frequency, high soil calcium content and erosion, which caused the intermixing of different parent materials, might favor its competitive interactions with other Mediterranean tree species, thus accounting for the local presence of Q. suber. The study of cork oak populationsthriving in peculiar substrates at the driest end of the range could be of great importance for the future conservation of this species, which is expected to face growing threats in the coming decades.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)336-344
Number of pages9
JournalIForest
Volume13
Publication statusPublished - 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Forestry
  • Ecology
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

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