Preliminary results of a geomorphological and DInSAR characterization of a recently identified Deep-Seated Gravitational Slope Deformation in Sicily (Southern Italy)

Chiara Cappadonia, Pierluigi Confuorto, Diego Di Martire, Ciro Sepe

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Abstract

The study is part of a larger project that involves the analysis of recently identified Deep-Seated Gravitational Slope Deformation (DSGSD) in Sicily which have been sub-divided according to the geological framework in light of the new geological data about the regional setting. Here are presented the first results of a multidisciplinary study of a DSGSD recently identify in Mount San Calogero area (Northern Sicily). The study was performed by means of different approaches including conventional methods (field surveys) and the Differential Interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) technique. The geological and geomorphological analyses were carried out to investigate slopes dynamic, and DInSAR analysis were integrated to obtain, for the first time in this area, displacement rates of the DSGSD. The identified deformation patterns show the effective movement of homogeneous rock mass that constitutes the Mount San Calogero, characterized by the gravitational morphostructures and evidence of slopes deformation, as well as the shallow landslides detected in the foothill area. Furthermore, the distribution of the Persistent Scatterers (PS) points shows a clear convergence with the main tectonic lineaments of the area, thereby emphasizing the role of the structural setting in the DSGSD's development.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)149-156
Number of pages8
JournalRENDICONTI ONLINE DELLA SOCIETÀ GEOLOGICA ITALIANA
Volume49/2019
Publication statusPublished - 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geology

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