Peripheral circulating cells with paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria phenotype after a first episode of cerebral sinus vein thrombosis: Results from a multicentre cross-sectional study

Simona Raso, Sergio Siragusa, Mariasanta Napolitano, Gianluca Sottilotta, Gaetano Giuffrida, Laura Parrinello, Simona Raso, Valeria Calafiore, Daniela Nicolosi, Giuseppina Rizzo, Anna Triolo, Rita Carlotta Santoro

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

Abstract

Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare, potentially fatal disorder of haematopoietic stem cells caused by mutations in an X-linked gene called phosphatidylinositol glycan class A, characterised by intravascular haemolysis, bone marrow failure and thrombotic events. The disease can occur at any age, although preferentially it affects young adults; its estimated prevalence is about 1/500,000 [1]. Clinical symptoms are variable and can include haemolytic anaemia, moderate to severe impairment of haematopoiesis and, in approximately 40% of patients, thrombosis of the vessels of the abdomen, brain and skin [2]. Rare, atypical site thrombosis of the splanchnic veins or cerebral sinuses are recognized as suggestive of the presence of a PNH clone [3]. To date, however, the prevalence of PNH clones in unselected patients with cerebral venous thrombosis is not yet known. The primary objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of PNH clones in patients with a recent history of cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) and up to twenty-four months follow-up. In this multicentre cross-sectional study, patients with an objective diagnosis of CSVT of new onset or occurring in the previous three years were investigated for the presence of PNH clones. Known or clinically suspected PNH and active treatments able to interfere
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85-87
Number of pages3
JournalThrombosis Research
Volume185
Publication statusPublished - 2020

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Cerebral Veins
Intracranial Sinus Thrombosis
Paroxysmal Hemoglobinuria
Cross-Sectional Studies
Phenotype
Clone Cells
Venous Thrombosis
Thrombosis
Intracranial Thrombosis
X-Linked Genes
Glycosylphosphatidylinositols
Viscera
Hemolytic Anemia
Hematopoiesis
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Hemolysis
Abdomen
Young Adult
Bone Marrow
Skin

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hematology

Cite this

Peripheral circulating cells with paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria phenotype after a first episode of cerebral sinus vein thrombosis: Results from a multicentre cross-sectional study. / Raso, Simona; Siragusa, Sergio; Napolitano, Mariasanta; Sottilotta, Gianluca; Giuffrida, Gaetano; Parrinello, Laura; Raso, Simona; Calafiore, Valeria; Nicolosi, Daniela; Rizzo, Giuseppina; Triolo, Anna; Santoro, Rita Carlotta.

In: Thrombosis Research, Vol. 185, 2020, p. 85-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

Raso, Simona ; Siragusa, Sergio ; Napolitano, Mariasanta ; Sottilotta, Gianluca ; Giuffrida, Gaetano ; Parrinello, Laura ; Raso, Simona ; Calafiore, Valeria ; Nicolosi, Daniela ; Rizzo, Giuseppina ; Triolo, Anna ; Santoro, Rita Carlotta. / Peripheral circulating cells with paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria phenotype after a first episode of cerebral sinus vein thrombosis: Results from a multicentre cross-sectional study. In: Thrombosis Research. 2020 ; Vol. 185. pp. 85-87.
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abstract = "Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare, potentially fatal disorder of haematopoietic stem cells caused by mutations in an X-linked gene called phosphatidylinositol glycan class A, characterised by intravascular haemolysis, bone marrow failure and thrombotic events. The disease can occur at any age, although preferentially it affects young adults; its estimated prevalence is about 1/500,000 [1]. Clinical symptoms are variable and can include haemolytic anaemia, moderate to severe impairment of haematopoiesis and, in approximately 40{\%} of patients, thrombosis of the vessels of the abdomen, brain and skin [2]. Rare, atypical site thrombosis of the splanchnic veins or cerebral sinuses are recognized as suggestive of the presence of a PNH clone [3]. To date, however, the prevalence of PNH clones in unselected patients with cerebral venous thrombosis is not yet known. The primary objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of PNH clones in patients with a recent history of cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) and up to twenty-four months follow-up. In this multicentre cross-sectional study, patients with an objective diagnosis of CSVT of new onset or occurring in the previous three years were investigated for the presence of PNH clones. Known or clinically suspected PNH and active treatments able to interfere",
author = "Simona Raso and Sergio Siragusa and Mariasanta Napolitano and Gianluca Sottilotta and Gaetano Giuffrida and Laura Parrinello and Simona Raso and Valeria Calafiore and Daniela Nicolosi and Giuseppina Rizzo and Anna Triolo and Santoro, {Rita Carlotta}",
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T1 - Peripheral circulating cells with paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria phenotype after a first episode of cerebral sinus vein thrombosis: Results from a multicentre cross-sectional study

AU - Raso, Simona

AU - Siragusa, Sergio

AU - Napolitano, Mariasanta

AU - Sottilotta, Gianluca

AU - Giuffrida, Gaetano

AU - Parrinello, Laura

AU - Raso, Simona

AU - Calafiore, Valeria

AU - Nicolosi, Daniela

AU - Rizzo, Giuseppina

AU - Triolo, Anna

AU - Santoro, Rita Carlotta

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare, potentially fatal disorder of haematopoietic stem cells caused by mutations in an X-linked gene called phosphatidylinositol glycan class A, characterised by intravascular haemolysis, bone marrow failure and thrombotic events. The disease can occur at any age, although preferentially it affects young adults; its estimated prevalence is about 1/500,000 [1]. Clinical symptoms are variable and can include haemolytic anaemia, moderate to severe impairment of haematopoiesis and, in approximately 40% of patients, thrombosis of the vessels of the abdomen, brain and skin [2]. Rare, atypical site thrombosis of the splanchnic veins or cerebral sinuses are recognized as suggestive of the presence of a PNH clone [3]. To date, however, the prevalence of PNH clones in unselected patients with cerebral venous thrombosis is not yet known. The primary objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of PNH clones in patients with a recent history of cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) and up to twenty-four months follow-up. In this multicentre cross-sectional study, patients with an objective diagnosis of CSVT of new onset or occurring in the previous three years were investigated for the presence of PNH clones. Known or clinically suspected PNH and active treatments able to interfere

AB - Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare, potentially fatal disorder of haematopoietic stem cells caused by mutations in an X-linked gene called phosphatidylinositol glycan class A, characterised by intravascular haemolysis, bone marrow failure and thrombotic events. The disease can occur at any age, although preferentially it affects young adults; its estimated prevalence is about 1/500,000 [1]. Clinical symptoms are variable and can include haemolytic anaemia, moderate to severe impairment of haematopoiesis and, in approximately 40% of patients, thrombosis of the vessels of the abdomen, brain and skin [2]. Rare, atypical site thrombosis of the splanchnic veins or cerebral sinuses are recognized as suggestive of the presence of a PNH clone [3]. To date, however, the prevalence of PNH clones in unselected patients with cerebral venous thrombosis is not yet known. The primary objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of PNH clones in patients with a recent history of cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) and up to twenty-four months follow-up. In this multicentre cross-sectional study, patients with an objective diagnosis of CSVT of new onset or occurring in the previous three years were investigated for the presence of PNH clones. Known or clinically suspected PNH and active treatments able to interfere

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/385769

M3 - Letter

VL - 185

SP - 85

EP - 87

JO - Thrombosis Research

JF - Thrombosis Research

SN - 0049-3848

ER -