Optimal design of flax fiber reinforced polymer composite as a lightweight component for automobiles from a life cycle assessment perspective

Giuseppe Ingarao, Yansong Guo, Yelin Deng, Peng Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The present study combines the generalized rule-of-mixture (ROM) model and the Ashby material selection method for the life cycle assessment (LCA) of flax fiber reinforced polymers (FRPs) and glass FRPs (GFRPs). The ROM model allows life cycle environmental impact predictions according to specific parameters of flax FRPs such as fiber format, volume fraction, manufacturing technique, and load-bearing capacity. The comparisons applied in this study are constructed on two common composite structures: mat panels and injection molded struts with equal stiffness and strength as the design criteria. On the one hand, the parametric LCA predicts that the equal strength design criterion for flax FRPs contributes to consistent mass increases, subsequently resulting in higher life cycle environmental impacts compared to the reference GFRPs; on the other hand, under the equal stiffness criterion the flax mat polypropylene (flax mat-PP) film helps with mass reduction in reference to the glass mat-PP composite, leading to the 20–50% life cycle environmental impact reductions for most impact categories. The subsequent evaluation of the influences of the fiber volume fraction on flax FRPs shows different patterns. For the short flax fiber-PP composite, a steady decrease of the life cycle CO2 emissions can be observed with the increasing fiber volume fraction. However, for the flax mat-PP composite, depending on the tensile modulus of the flax fiber, the optimal volume fractions of the fiber change from 28 to 32% v/v, whereby the lowest life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions can be achieved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)986-997
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Industrial Ecology
Volume23
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Fingerprint

life cycle assessment
life cycle
motor vehicle
automobile
polymer
environmental impact
glass
manufacturing
stiffness
fibre
evaluation
greenhouse gas

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Optimal design of flax fiber reinforced polymer composite as a lightweight component for automobiles from a life cycle assessment perspective. / Ingarao, Giuseppe; Guo, Yansong; Deng, Yelin; Wu, Peng.

In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, Vol. 23, 2019, p. 986-997.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{04fe2f33e3a34f439cc6b071cde6419f,
title = "Optimal design of flax fiber reinforced polymer composite as a lightweight component for automobiles from a life cycle assessment perspective",
abstract = "The present study combines the generalized rule-of-mixture (ROM) model and the Ashby material selection method for the life cycle assessment (LCA) of flax fiber reinforced polymers (FRPs) and glass FRPs (GFRPs). The ROM model allows life cycle environmental impact predictions according to specific parameters of flax FRPs such as fiber format, volume fraction, manufacturing technique, and load-bearing capacity. The comparisons applied in this study are constructed on two common composite structures: mat panels and injection molded struts with equal stiffness and strength as the design criteria. On the one hand, the parametric LCA predicts that the equal strength design criterion for flax FRPs contributes to consistent mass increases, subsequently resulting in higher life cycle environmental impacts compared to the reference GFRPs; on the other hand, under the equal stiffness criterion the flax mat polypropylene (flax mat-PP) film helps with mass reduction in reference to the glass mat-PP composite, leading to the 20–50{\%} life cycle environmental impact reductions for most impact categories. The subsequent evaluation of the influences of the fiber volume fraction on flax FRPs shows different patterns. For the short flax fiber-PP composite, a steady decrease of the life cycle CO2 emissions can be observed with the increasing fiber volume fraction. However, for the flax mat-PP composite, depending on the tensile modulus of the flax fiber, the optimal volume fractions of the fiber change from 28 to 32{\%} v/v, whereby the lowest life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions can be achieved.",
keywords = "automotive, composite, flax fiber, industrial ecology, life cycle assessment, rule-of-mixture model",
author = "Giuseppe Ingarao and Yansong Guo and Yelin Deng and Peng Wu",
year = "2019",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "986--997",
journal = "Journal of Industrial Ecology",
issn = "1088-1980",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Optimal design of flax fiber reinforced polymer composite as a lightweight component for automobiles from a life cycle assessment perspective

AU - Ingarao, Giuseppe

AU - Guo, Yansong

AU - Deng, Yelin

AU - Wu, Peng

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - The present study combines the generalized rule-of-mixture (ROM) model and the Ashby material selection method for the life cycle assessment (LCA) of flax fiber reinforced polymers (FRPs) and glass FRPs (GFRPs). The ROM model allows life cycle environmental impact predictions according to specific parameters of flax FRPs such as fiber format, volume fraction, manufacturing technique, and load-bearing capacity. The comparisons applied in this study are constructed on two common composite structures: mat panels and injection molded struts with equal stiffness and strength as the design criteria. On the one hand, the parametric LCA predicts that the equal strength design criterion for flax FRPs contributes to consistent mass increases, subsequently resulting in higher life cycle environmental impacts compared to the reference GFRPs; on the other hand, under the equal stiffness criterion the flax mat polypropylene (flax mat-PP) film helps with mass reduction in reference to the glass mat-PP composite, leading to the 20–50% life cycle environmental impact reductions for most impact categories. The subsequent evaluation of the influences of the fiber volume fraction on flax FRPs shows different patterns. For the short flax fiber-PP composite, a steady decrease of the life cycle CO2 emissions can be observed with the increasing fiber volume fraction. However, for the flax mat-PP composite, depending on the tensile modulus of the flax fiber, the optimal volume fractions of the fiber change from 28 to 32% v/v, whereby the lowest life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions can be achieved.

AB - The present study combines the generalized rule-of-mixture (ROM) model and the Ashby material selection method for the life cycle assessment (LCA) of flax fiber reinforced polymers (FRPs) and glass FRPs (GFRPs). The ROM model allows life cycle environmental impact predictions according to specific parameters of flax FRPs such as fiber format, volume fraction, manufacturing technique, and load-bearing capacity. The comparisons applied in this study are constructed on two common composite structures: mat panels and injection molded struts with equal stiffness and strength as the design criteria. On the one hand, the parametric LCA predicts that the equal strength design criterion for flax FRPs contributes to consistent mass increases, subsequently resulting in higher life cycle environmental impacts compared to the reference GFRPs; on the other hand, under the equal stiffness criterion the flax mat polypropylene (flax mat-PP) film helps with mass reduction in reference to the glass mat-PP composite, leading to the 20–50% life cycle environmental impact reductions for most impact categories. The subsequent evaluation of the influences of the fiber volume fraction on flax FRPs shows different patterns. For the short flax fiber-PP composite, a steady decrease of the life cycle CO2 emissions can be observed with the increasing fiber volume fraction. However, for the flax mat-PP composite, depending on the tensile modulus of the flax fiber, the optimal volume fractions of the fiber change from 28 to 32% v/v, whereby the lowest life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions can be achieved.

KW - automotive

KW - composite

KW - flax fiber

KW - industrial ecology

KW - life cycle assessment

KW - rule-of-mixture model

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/368410

UR - http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1530-9290

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 986

EP - 997

JO - Journal of Industrial Ecology

JF - Journal of Industrial Ecology

SN - 1088-1980

ER -