L’unificazione europea della segnaletica stradale

    Research output: Contribution to conferenceOther

    Abstract

    [automatically translated] Road safety in Europe is a topic that relates in a particular manner throughout the Union. In the Europe of the Fifteen (EU-15), it is 375 million road users, 200 million of which possess a driver's license, using vehicles of a total of 4 million km of roads. Automobile accidents are today due to more than 40,000 deaths and 1.7 million injuries per year on the mainland. The cost, direct or indirect of this carnage, estimates the European Commission, is about 160 billion euros, or 2% of GDP. In Italy due to road accidents, there are about 8,000 deaths a year. 50% of these accidents as people with victims under the age of 41 years and 25% younger than 23 years. Over the past 30 years, however (1970-2000) the volume of road traffic in Europe has tripled, however, the victims of road accidents trend has halved. Broadly these numbers show us how much of it is of enormous trucking phenomenon, how many people directly involved and what the cost generated in terms of safety. The "White Paper on European Transport Policy ', listed as an objective the further halving of the number of losses by 2010. There are various interventions that could help improve safety on the road, both in infrastructure and regulatory: the harmonization of maximum rate of blood alcohol, the violations of the sanctions regime, the standardization of variable message signs, etc. It was asked in particular whether that improvement could be separated from a harmonization of national intervention signage systems. Two surveys conducted between October 2004 and January 2005 by the ADAC (German Automobile Club), in collaboration with ACI and other European Automobile Club showed a relevant fact: 91% of EU respondents claim motorists fewer signs , greater rationalization and harmonization of the same, greater visibility. The White Paper shows how these factors are of fundamental importance for the security of cross-border traffic by road, especially on the major European roads: an example are the drivers, who, leading heavy vehicles for long periods of time, represent a very high risk to other road users. Greater uniformity of road signs allow drivers to have to transpose a lower burden of visual information, making reference to a smaller number of traffic signs, as harmonized with those of their countries of origin. Although to date the European signage is not yet completely unified, you may still notice some pretty obvious similarities between the road signs of the different European nations. These similarities are a reflection of the international conventions that countries wanted to take to facilitate trade between them. These agreements came to act in the matter and are the conventions of Paris (24 April 1926), Geneva (19 September 1949) and Vienna (November 8, 1968). Greater uniformity of road signs allow drivers to have to transpose a lower burden of visual information, making reference to a smaller number of traffic signs, as harmonized with those of their countries of origin. Although to date the European signage is not yet completely unified, you may still notice some pretty obvious similarities between the road signs of the different European nations. These similarities are a reflection of the international conventions that countries wanted to take to facilitate trade between them. These agreements came to act in the matter and are the conventions of Paris (24 April 1926), Geneva (19 September 1949) and Vienna (November 8, 1968). Greater uniformity of road signs allow drivers to have to transpose a lower burden of visual information, makin
    Original languageItalian
    Pages211-218
    Number of pages8
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

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