EMERGING ROLE OF ULTRASOUND IMAGING ASSOCIATED TO CLINICAL NEUROPHYSIOLOGY AS A SUPPLEMENTARY DIAGNOSTICS TECHNIQUE OF PERIPHERAL NERVES PATHOLOGIES: A SICILIAN EXPERIENCE

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

    Abstract

    PURPOSE: to show the relevance of peripheral nerve ultrasound imaging as a supplementary technique in a clinical neurophysiological evaluation. METHODS: peripheral nerves ultrasound (US) examination was performed in patients with a medical history of nerve entrapment and/or post-traumatic neuropathy but with clinical or neurophysiological unusual findings. A 10-18 MHz transducer was used. RESULTS: we recruited 50 patients with clinical evidence of peripheral neuropathies (25M, 25F): 24 median nerves, 1 anterior interosseous, 14 ulnar, 3 brachial plexus, 2 posterior interosseus, 1 superficial radial, 1 superficial peroneal and 4 common peroneal nerves. Overall 20/50 patients had a history of trauma: 4/24 patients with median pathology, 6/14 ulnar, 3/4 common peroneal, 1/2 posterior interosseous and all cases of involvement of the brachial plexus, superficial peroneal and superficial radial nerves. CONCLUSIONS: our data show that peripheral nerve US is advisable: in all patients with post-traumatic etiology (40%) as it could reveal neuromas and neurotmesis; in all post-surgical iatrogenic onset neuropathies for the uncommon sites of injury; in severe diseases with not evocable nerve at the neurophysiological examination; in patients with diffuse pre-existing (and confounding) neurophysiological alterations (but with clinical suspect of new neuropathy); in entrapment neuropathies for screening purpose (we found concomitant tenosynovitis in 21.7% of carpal tunnel syndromes; dynamic ulnar nerve luxation at the elbow in 28.5% of case); in all brachial plexus pathologies as multiple sites of injury – i.e. radial, ulnar and posterior interosseous have been documented; for early selection of surgical candidates and post-surgical patients monitoring.
    Original languageEnglish
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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    Neurophysiology
    Peripheral Nerves
    Ultrasonography
    Pathology
    Brachial Plexus
    Nerve Compression Syndromes
    Tenosynovitis
    Nervous System Trauma
    Neuroma
    Radial Nerve
    Peroneal Nerve
    Ulnar Nerve
    Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
    Multiple Trauma
    Median Nerve
    Wounds and Injuries
    Physiologic Monitoring
    Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
    Elbow
    Transducers

    Cite this

    @conference{e31a06c03e5944688eb8df7b12354bcb,
    title = "EMERGING ROLE OF ULTRASOUND IMAGING ASSOCIATED TO CLINICAL NEUROPHYSIOLOGY AS A SUPPLEMENTARY DIAGNOSTICS TECHNIQUE OF PERIPHERAL NERVES PATHOLOGIES: A SICILIAN EXPERIENCE",
    abstract = "PURPOSE: to show the relevance of peripheral nerve ultrasound imaging as a supplementary technique in a clinical neurophysiological evaluation. METHODS: peripheral nerves ultrasound (US) examination was performed in patients with a medical history of nerve entrapment and/or post-traumatic neuropathy but with clinical or neurophysiological unusual findings. A 10-18 MHz transducer was used. RESULTS: we recruited 50 patients with clinical evidence of peripheral neuropathies (25M, 25F): 24 median nerves, 1 anterior interosseous, 14 ulnar, 3 brachial plexus, 2 posterior interosseus, 1 superficial radial, 1 superficial peroneal and 4 common peroneal nerves. Overall 20/50 patients had a history of trauma: 4/24 patients with median pathology, 6/14 ulnar, 3/4 common peroneal, 1/2 posterior interosseous and all cases of involvement of the brachial plexus, superficial peroneal and superficial radial nerves. CONCLUSIONS: our data show that peripheral nerve US is advisable: in all patients with post-traumatic etiology (40{\%}) as it could reveal neuromas and neurotmesis; in all post-surgical iatrogenic onset neuropathies for the uncommon sites of injury; in severe diseases with not evocable nerve at the neurophysiological examination; in patients with diffuse pre-existing (and confounding) neurophysiological alterations (but with clinical suspect of new neuropathy); in entrapment neuropathies for screening purpose (we found concomitant tenosynovitis in 21.7{\%} of carpal tunnel syndromes; dynamic ulnar nerve luxation at the elbow in 28.5{\%} of case); in all brachial plexus pathologies as multiple sites of injury – i.e. radial, ulnar and posterior interosseous have been documented; for early selection of surgical candidates and post-surgical patients monitoring.",
    author = "Cesare Gagliardo",
    year = "2013",
    language = "English",

    }

    TY - CONF

    T1 - EMERGING ROLE OF ULTRASOUND IMAGING ASSOCIATED TO CLINICAL NEUROPHYSIOLOGY AS A SUPPLEMENTARY DIAGNOSTICS TECHNIQUE OF PERIPHERAL NERVES PATHOLOGIES: A SICILIAN EXPERIENCE

    AU - Gagliardo, Cesare

    PY - 2013

    Y1 - 2013

    N2 - PURPOSE: to show the relevance of peripheral nerve ultrasound imaging as a supplementary technique in a clinical neurophysiological evaluation. METHODS: peripheral nerves ultrasound (US) examination was performed in patients with a medical history of nerve entrapment and/or post-traumatic neuropathy but with clinical or neurophysiological unusual findings. A 10-18 MHz transducer was used. RESULTS: we recruited 50 patients with clinical evidence of peripheral neuropathies (25M, 25F): 24 median nerves, 1 anterior interosseous, 14 ulnar, 3 brachial plexus, 2 posterior interosseus, 1 superficial radial, 1 superficial peroneal and 4 common peroneal nerves. Overall 20/50 patients had a history of trauma: 4/24 patients with median pathology, 6/14 ulnar, 3/4 common peroneal, 1/2 posterior interosseous and all cases of involvement of the brachial plexus, superficial peroneal and superficial radial nerves. CONCLUSIONS: our data show that peripheral nerve US is advisable: in all patients with post-traumatic etiology (40%) as it could reveal neuromas and neurotmesis; in all post-surgical iatrogenic onset neuropathies for the uncommon sites of injury; in severe diseases with not evocable nerve at the neurophysiological examination; in patients with diffuse pre-existing (and confounding) neurophysiological alterations (but with clinical suspect of new neuropathy); in entrapment neuropathies for screening purpose (we found concomitant tenosynovitis in 21.7% of carpal tunnel syndromes; dynamic ulnar nerve luxation at the elbow in 28.5% of case); in all brachial plexus pathologies as multiple sites of injury – i.e. radial, ulnar and posterior interosseous have been documented; for early selection of surgical candidates and post-surgical patients monitoring.

    AB - PURPOSE: to show the relevance of peripheral nerve ultrasound imaging as a supplementary technique in a clinical neurophysiological evaluation. METHODS: peripheral nerves ultrasound (US) examination was performed in patients with a medical history of nerve entrapment and/or post-traumatic neuropathy but with clinical or neurophysiological unusual findings. A 10-18 MHz transducer was used. RESULTS: we recruited 50 patients with clinical evidence of peripheral neuropathies (25M, 25F): 24 median nerves, 1 anterior interosseous, 14 ulnar, 3 brachial plexus, 2 posterior interosseus, 1 superficial radial, 1 superficial peroneal and 4 common peroneal nerves. Overall 20/50 patients had a history of trauma: 4/24 patients with median pathology, 6/14 ulnar, 3/4 common peroneal, 1/2 posterior interosseous and all cases of involvement of the brachial plexus, superficial peroneal and superficial radial nerves. CONCLUSIONS: our data show that peripheral nerve US is advisable: in all patients with post-traumatic etiology (40%) as it could reveal neuromas and neurotmesis; in all post-surgical iatrogenic onset neuropathies for the uncommon sites of injury; in severe diseases with not evocable nerve at the neurophysiological examination; in patients with diffuse pre-existing (and confounding) neurophysiological alterations (but with clinical suspect of new neuropathy); in entrapment neuropathies for screening purpose (we found concomitant tenosynovitis in 21.7% of carpal tunnel syndromes; dynamic ulnar nerve luxation at the elbow in 28.5% of case); in all brachial plexus pathologies as multiple sites of injury – i.e. radial, ulnar and posterior interosseous have been documented; for early selection of surgical candidates and post-surgical patients monitoring.

    UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/84172

    M3 - Paper

    ER -