Academic Workload, Workaholism e benessere individuale: uno studio esplorativo su effetti e conseguenze del sovraccarico lavorativo in accademia

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOtherpeer-review

Abstract

[automatically translated] The so-called "workaholic" seems to be a state increasingly popular within high responsibility professions, although it is in some way justified, as socially and culturally approved, we should not forget that it is still a situation can , long-term, to produce states of widespread malaise in people who are involved. Such continuous condition and persistent state of professional commitment is typical of those who work at academic structures: there is an interesting line of research that explored the continuing increase in work demands that plagues the Western academic world, and that overlaps with an increasingly competitive and intense research (or rather, the publication of their research work) that related to ' increase in educational activities and supervision. To these must be added the ever more pressing commitments related to the so called "third mission" (and with it the explicit request to get busy in raising funds). All this is combined with an increase for the three aspects mentioned supra, the bureaucratization processes. This is called the Academic Workload, which in recent years the research report to be greatly increased in our profession (Tight, 2010). The present work is aimed at trying to explore the connection between the Academic Workload, the degree of well-being, and the possible effects of addiction to work in academics. The participants of this preliminary study are professors of the University of Palermo, balanced to CUN area of belonging, which is under the administration DUWAS scale (Dutch Workaholism Scale), the Schaufeli (Taris, Schaufeli & Verhoeven, 2005), which investigates two dimensions, the Excessive Work (Work Excessively or WE) and Compulsive Work (Work compulsively or WC), a scale that investigates the academic Workload (AW) developed by Houston, Meyer & Paewai (2006), which explores three dimensions (academic overload, teaching and research activities, academic environment) and finally the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12, Goldberg, 1978). Preliminary results show a close relationship between the academic commitment, the risk of addiction to work and unwell expressed by the GHQ-12. the Excessive Work (Work Excessively or WE) and Compulsive Work (Work compulsively or WC), a scale that investigates the Academic Workload (AW) developed by Houston, Meyer & Paewai (2006), which explores three dimensions (overload academic, teaching and research activities, academic environment) and finally the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12, Goldberg, 1978). Preliminary results show a close relationship between the academic commitment, the risk of addiction to work and unwell expressed by the GHQ-12. the Excessive Work (Work Excessively or WE) and Compulsive Work (Work compulsively or WC), a scale that investigates the Academic Workload (AW) developed by Houston, Meyer & Paewai (2006), which explores three dimensions (overload academic, teaching and research activities, academic environment) and finally the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12, Goldberg, 1978). Preliminary results show a close relationship between the academic commitment, the risk of addiction to work and unwell expressed by the GHQ-12. academic environment) and finally the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12, Goldberg, 1978). Preliminary results show a close relationship between the academic commitment, the risk of addiction to work and unwell expressed by the GHQ-12. academic environment) and finally the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12, Goldberg, 1978). Preliminary results show a close relationship between t
Original languageItalian
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Cite this