A food borne outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Brandenburg as a hint tocompare human, animal and food isolates identified in the years 2005-2009 inItaly.

Caterina Mammina, Marconi, Antonino Nastasi, Romanelli, Anna Maria Di Noto, Donato, Aurora Aleo

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Introduction. There are only a few reported cases of Salmonella enterica serotype Brandenburg foodborne outbreaks in the literature. In Italy Brandenburg is consistently present among the top-ten serotypes from human source, but at low prevalences.Methods. Fifty-five S. Brandenburg isolates from human, animal, environmental and food sources, including twelve isolates from a foodborne outbreak, were genotyped by PFGE.Results and Discussion. Eight pulsogroups and 19 pulsotypes were detected, with a unique pulsotype being attributed to the outbreak strains. Molecular subtyping can reliably complement the epidemiological investigations. Moreover, mapping molecular types of Salmonella isolates from human and non-human source may greatly contribute to risk assessment, by tracking possible animal sources, so improving cost-effectiveness of the prevention and control strategies.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)9-11
    Number of pages3
    JournalJournal of Preventive Medicine and Hygiene
    Volume52
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
    • Infectious Diseases

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